Author Topic: The proper chop technique: (a request)  (Read 3732 times)

bwaynef

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The proper chop technique: (a request)
« on: August 02, 2013, 10:59 AM »
Does anyone have any pictorials on proper chop technique?  I've seen Bonsai Journal's article, but wondered if anyone had less idealized examples ...from the real world.

I've got a smattering of Tridents that've been chopped and I'd like them to heal smoothly/well.

Thanks
 

Sorce

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Re: The proper chop technique: (a request)
« Reply #1 on: August 06, 2013, 07:28 AM »
Smatter of fact, I would love to get pro advice on this too! 
If I recall Bwaynef, Peter Tea's blog has some really well healed tridents, not chopped, but I would consult him.
Best tridents info I've found. 

https://peterteabonsai.wordpress.com/2012/05/15/repotting-a-beast/

Just my bookmark page, search content for tridents.

And a pic cuz its easy, of my chopped elm that budded all around the cut, almost perfectly.
 

Brian Van Fleet

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Re: The proper chop technique: (a request)
« Reply #2 on: August 06, 2013, 08:39 AM »
Here is one I'm working on...

February
March...cut flat
July...growing strong
Carved for taper
« Last Edit: August 06, 2013, 08:54 AM by Brian Van Fleet »
 

Bonsai Study Group Admin

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Re: The proper chop technique: (a request)
« Reply #3 on: August 06, 2013, 08:48 AM »
Welcome to the Bonsai Study Group.  Please take a moment to read the Welcome thread.

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bwaynef

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Re: The proper chop technique: (a request)
« Reply #4 on: August 06, 2013, 10:48 AM »
February
March...cut flat
July...growing strong
Carved for taper

What's it look like about 50-60° ccw on that last pic?
 

Judy

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Re: The proper chop technique: (a request)
« Reply #5 on: August 06, 2013, 03:13 PM »
And what did you use to "carve" that with?  I find this part pretty challenging too, nice to see a good pictorial.
 

0soyoung

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Re: The proper chop technique: (a request)
« Reply #6 on: August 06, 2013, 05:52 PM »
A quality cross-cut saw (such as would be used in a miter box) works well to make the angled cut. I also like 'textured tooth carbide' bits for Dremel tools for this and similar purposes.
 

bwaynef

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Re: The proper chop technique: (a request)
« Reply #7 on: August 06, 2013, 07:44 PM »
To be clear, an angled cut isn't much of a mystery to me.  Its the smoothing of the angled cuts that form realistic scars ...that melt away over time into smooth trunk sections is what really interests me.  That's why I'd like to see BVF's tree showing the scar rather than the taper the chop created.

Do those Dremel bits not gum up during use?
 

Brian Van Fleet

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Re: The proper chop technique: (a request)
« Reply #8 on: August 06, 2013, 08:11 PM »
The first angled cut was made with a saw, the I used big root cutters to smooth it out.  I did not hollow it out, it's mostly smooth, and I can keep hollowing it out if necessary as it heals.

I don't have a shot of the back, here's the closest I can get.
 

0soyoung

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Re: The proper chop technique: (a request)
« Reply #9 on: August 06, 2013, 11:35 PM »
Do those Dremel bits not gum up during use?

Yes, when used on live wood, but they do keep cutting even when gummed. They are easily cleaned with a small butane/propane torch (temperature is far too low to affect the tungsten carbide teeth).
 

Brian Van Fleet

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Re: The proper chop technique: (a request)
« Reply #10 on: August 08, 2013, 06:52 PM »
Backside...
 

bwaynef

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Re: The proper chop technique: (a request)
« Reply #11 on: August 15, 2013, 01:22 PM »
Here are the victims.  The intent is/was to go ahead and chop them, then for several, to layer them in a better place next spring.  What do you think?
« Last Edit: August 15, 2013, 02:59 PM by bwaynef »
 

bwaynef

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Re: The proper chop technique: (a request)
« Reply #12 on: August 15, 2013, 01:23 PM »
Last one for now:

(Sorry they're not uprights.  I'll work on that later ...maybe.)
« Last Edit: August 15, 2013, 02:59 PM by bwaynef »
 

Brian Van Fleet

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Re: The proper chop technique: (a request)
« Reply #13 on: August 17, 2013, 08:27 AM »
Good base on a couple of those!
On carving, I'll wait and carve the backmore concave next year after the wood starts to dry, then open up the cambium to keep the callus rolling.
 

Chrisl

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Re: The proper chop technique: (a request)
« Reply #14 on: August 18, 2013, 10:15 AM »
Good base on a couple of those!
On carving, I'll wait and carve the backmore concave next year after the wood starts to dry, then open up the cambium to keep the callus rolling.

Is this is something you do every yr Brian till it closes completely?