Author Topic: The "Bareroot Half The Tree" Technique Survey  (Read 29408 times)

John Kirby

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Re: The "Bareroot Half The Tree" Technique Survey
« Reply #15 on: February 17, 2015, 09:15 PM »
I have been doing it for almost ten years now. One key point is that you do root and soil reduction all the way around the trunk. You bare root then 1/2 (eg, the front 1/2 if the tree, from the core out. You have a greatly reduced root mass in the remaining 1/2 of the tree. The reduced water uptake of the barerooted side balances out pretty well with the reduced root pad on the opposite side. If you use really hood repotting medium, you have eliminated the need to clean out the core for a decade (or decades).

This technique has had spectacular results for me, a great way to resuscitate weak trees and ensure optimal growth/health for trees being refined.
 

Owen Reich

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Re: The "Bareroot Half The Tree" Technique Survey
« Reply #16 on: February 17, 2015, 09:50 PM »
Thanks for the feedback Adair and John.  Will do it on the pine I was just given and keep everyone here "posted"  :P.

 

Adair M

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Re: The "Bareroot Half The Tree" Technique Survey
« Reply #17 on: February 17, 2015, 10:25 PM »
Owen, when picking which half to bare root, choose the side with the poorest roots. They'll benefit the most from the new good soil.
 

augustine

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Re: The "Bareroot Half The Tree" Technique Survey
« Reply #18 on: February 18, 2015, 09:45 AM »
Owen,

John Kirby showed me his technique and helped me do this on a Japanese yew (in an organic nursery soil)  last March, great results. I then repotted two pines and two junipers in the same manner.

All very good results. Trees did not sulk and grew well.

Best regards,

Ray
 

LanceMac10

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Re: The "Bareroot Half The Tree" Technique Survey
« Reply #19 on: February 18, 2015, 01:12 PM »
As far as the Pine I posted, I've planned a spring repot. I had not planned on any pruning until summer 2016. It was my understanding to leave as many needles as possible to aid in the forming of new roots. Am I mistaken? I have been trying to source a new pot, but have not found anything I thought suitable. Shallower? Wider? I would really like to get out West to work with Boon and Adair, (if you happened to be there!). Alas, I waited until my 40's began to have a kid! Don't laugh!! So, no money to hand for a trip to California. Any small pointers are appreciated. Here's to spring, it should arrive in New England in about TWO MONTHS!!! Have a great day, and a better tomorrow!!
 

John Kirby

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Re: The "Bareroot Half The Tree" Technique Survey
« Reply #20 on: February 18, 2015, 02:30 PM »
Lance, lot's of folks in NE can help. PM me and lets see if we can't get you with some help. John
 

bwaynef

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Re: The "Bareroot Half The Tree" Technique Survey
« Reply #21 on: February 18, 2015, 02:55 PM »
Anybody have some links or information so that I can understand the technique and what it is all about.  Been searching Google and cannot find much.

Check out Boon's repotting dvds.  I'm not POSITIVE he does a 50:50 bareroot, but I bet you won't be disappointed.
 

DorianJF

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Re: The "Bareroot Half The Tree" Technique Survey
« Reply #22 on: February 18, 2015, 11:09 PM »
Thanks Bwaynef.
 

Adair M

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Re: The "Bareroot Half The Tree" Technique Survey
« Reply #23 on: February 21, 2015, 02:01 PM »
On FaceBook, Boon posted a huge California Juniper "reboxing", that got half bare rooted.

Pictures are worth 1000 words...
 

Dan W.

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Re: The "Bareroot Half The Tree" Technique Survey
« Reply #24 on: February 23, 2015, 11:28 AM »
Thanks Owen. Yes, I was referring to removal of nursery, or field, soil for conifers. I've actually done both ways at Michaels. He will generally do exactly as John mentioned: Reduction of soil mass and combing all the way around; then bare rooting half. The other half gets it the next time around. I fully agree there is no reason to bare root a tree in good soil. At Kouka-en, do you just leave field soil inside good soil for collected trees?

For the less experienced readers.. Healthy deciduous or tropical trees with field soil get a full root job and washing at my house...lol. Then they go into man in-organic mix.
 

Owen Reich

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Re: The "Bareroot Half The Tree" Technique Survey
« Reply #25 on: February 23, 2015, 01:57 PM »
At Kouka-en, we rarely repotted or acquired bonsai with field soil still attached.  Even field grown trees and shrubs grown for bonsai were washed of field soil and repotted before we got them.  I'm confident we would not leave it in the center mass of the tree as the "heart" (core of root mass under the trunk) is important for the health of a plant.

We did on occasion get trees in large terra cotta or grow boxes with crappy media throughout the container; generally from hobbyists' collections.  We would bare root as much as possible for a given species, perforate the root mass, and plan on another more aggressive repotting in 2-3 years. 

Such is the way of things at a more specialized bonsai garden. With the black pines in the worst of media conditions, we bare-rooted sections with patches of dead roots and whittled away at the old media.  It really depended on the ratio of foliage to root mass when removing the old media.  As much as possible.  Junipers' root systems were always kept more intact, but perforated more.  The rambling nature of juniper roots on collected shimpaku lead us to cut less larger roots and clean out around them more.

We do not mess with the surface roots on Ezo Spruce; they tend to stall for a year or so if the surface roots are raked.  Given that we never did it, I can't say that it does.  Given my teacher repotted a ton at Mansei-en I am inclined to believe him  :).
 

Adair M

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Re: The "Bareroot Half The Tree" Technique Survey
« Reply #26 on: February 23, 2015, 02:10 PM »
Good to know about Ezo Spruce. That's the thing about bonsai:  there are the general set of techniques that most trees tolerate 98 percent of the time. And then, there is the other 2percent!
 

SpongeMann

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Re: The "Bareroot Half The Tree" Technique Survey
« Reply #27 on: February 28, 2015, 11:23 PM »
Hey guys. Cool thread. All my florida  conifers that I collect are barerooted. Only because they grow in  90%sand out here. Once you get it out of the ground the soil crumbles.  My conifers take the transplant real good. Do you guys have any tips for stopping sap flow. I have one transplant that was a little too late. I used wax ,which seemed to help.
 

Markyscott

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Re: The "Bareroot Half The Tree" Technique Survey
« Reply #28 on: March 02, 2015, 11:25 PM »
Here's an example.  This is a Western Juniper I started working on about 3 years ago.  It was potted in the original field soil when I  purchased it.  I bare-rooted 1/2 and took a photo 2 years later when we removed the rest of the field soil.  I attached a photo of the tree at purchase and a picture of the roots during the second repotting.  I think you can see a nice improvement in the roots on the side that was originally bare-rooted.

- Scott
 

Owen Reich

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Re: The "Bareroot Half The Tree" Technique Survey
« Reply #29 on: March 03, 2015, 12:50 PM »
Nice tree and photos.  Thanks