Author Topic: Species ID  (Read 5198 times)

Tyrone.C

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Species ID
« on: September 16, 2016, 07:44 PM »
Hello all, I'm new to the forum.  Yesterday, I just picked up a small tree.  I've been wanting to venture into this hobby since starting in Freshwater planted aquariums and trying to mimic bonsai trees with driftwood and moss.  So here I am.   I have a bit of a green thumb and so far, I haven't killed any of my bought bonsais from Chinatown and IKEA.  So that has to count for something. 




So I would like to identify this tree.  From my online research I leaning towards some sort of Maple.  Maybe Sycamore?  I honestly am clueless.  Still learning species.  Please let me know you're expertise.  Thank you in advance! 


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Tyrone.C

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Re: Species ID
« Reply #1 on: September 22, 2016, 06:42 PM »
Anybody?


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Larry Gockley

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Re: Species ID
« Reply #2 on: September 23, 2016, 02:08 PM »
Look at the leaf growth pattern. If they grow in threes, left right and center, I say Maple, but just looking at the leaf, it looks like Sweet gum . Sweet gum leaves grow in clusters, and maple in a left, right, center pattern.
 

Tyrone.C

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Re: Species ID
« Reply #3 on: September 23, 2016, 02:19 PM »
Look at the leaf growth pattern. If they grow in threes, left right and center, I say Maple, but just looking at the leaf, it looks like Sweet gum . Sweet gum leaves grow in clusters, and maple in a left, right, center pattern.
Thank you for chiming in Larry.  I looked up the Sweet Gum species, but they don't seem to have leaves like this.  I'm still leaning towards Maple, just can't seem to find the exact sp. 




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Leo in NE Illinois

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Re: Species ID
« Reply #4 on: October 17, 2016, 06:27 PM »
Hard to say which species of maple this is. Where did it come from? Where (at least generally) in the world are you located. Is it a seedling from somewhere out in the back yard? A nursery? Should we be looking at possible native USA maples? Or one of the European maples?

Assuming you are in the USA, my first guess would be "Norway maple", Acer pseudoplatanus, a European species that has become  a weed tree in the USA and is ubiquitous in urban and suburban back yards. If you cut a leaf off, the leaf petiole should bleed a milky white sap. The USA native sugar maple Acer saccharum, will bleed a clear, colorless sap.

But without more information, it is hard to say.

By the way, this forum has been rather sleepy lately, but when someone finally answers, the replies tend to be high in good information, as opposed to Bonsai Nut, where you will get many replies per hour, and half will be nonsense or sometimes just plain wrong or misleading. However, I do like BNut, but you do have to double check information in replies, especially from certain posters.

Everything on the internet is true, right? Check replies here too, though generally this forum is pretty good.
 

bwaynef

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Re: Species ID
« Reply #5 on: October 18, 2016, 08:46 AM »
I'm led to believe this is a sweetgum.  Sweetgum leaves are alternate and maples are opposite.
 

Tyrone.C

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Species ID
« Reply #6 on: October 18, 2016, 01:48 PM »
Thank you so much for the info.  I acquired the tree from a yard sale.  So I honestly am not sure where the tree is from.  I'm located in California, Los Angeles to be exact.  The gentleman that I had purchased it from said it was an Oak.  But I wasn't convinced that he knew exactly what it was. 


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Tyrone.C

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Re: Species ID
« Reply #7 on: October 18, 2016, 02:00 PM »
Hard to say which species of maple this is. Where did it come from? Where (at least generally) in the world are you located. Is it a seedling from somewhere out in the back yard? A nursery? Should we be looking at possible native USA maples? Or one of the European maples?

Assuming you are in the USA, my first guess would be "Norway maple", Acer pseudoplatanus, a European species that has become  a weed tree in the USA and is ubiquitous in urban and suburban back yards. If you cut a leaf off, the leaf petiole should bleed a milky white sap. The USA native sugar maple Acer saccharum, will bleed a clear, colorless sap.

But without more information, it is hard to say.

By the way, this forum has been rather sleepy lately, but when someone finally answers, the replies tend to be high in good information, as opposed to Bonsai Nut, where you will get many replies per hour, and half will be nonsense or sometimes just plain wrong or misleading. However, I do like BNut, but you do have to double check information in replies, especially from certain posters.

Everything on the internet is true, right? Check replies here too, though generally this forum is pretty good.
Thank you for chiming in.  I'll do the sap identification as soon as I get home. 

Quick question, so the leaf structure will change as the tree gets older? 

I really would like to find out the species so I can know the proper care for it.  I know that's what most of the bonsai literature emphasize, the health of the tree first, before any sort of hacking, pruning or training. 


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Tyrone.C

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Re: Species ID
« Reply #8 on: October 18, 2016, 02:07 PM »
I'm led to believe this is a sweetgum.  Sweetgum leaves are alternate and maples are opposite.
Thank you. I'm still learning about trees and their anatomy.  I'll look further into this and research more. 


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