Author Topic: Prunus Spinosa  (Read 2367 times)

Sorce

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Prunus Spinosa
« on: April 12, 2014, 07:26 AM »
 ;D My youngest "apprentice".

With the ice out, repotting begins.

This Sloe was planted in Aquarium rocks and compost. I was surprised to see Anthony's recent post on this. More surprised to see the dense root system it cultivated. Even more
Surprising is the fact that this guy took the 3 story plunge from the sill in Sept. Or Oct.
Compliments of my tiny apprentice.!

My 5 year old "apprentice" was taking the photos.

This year. It went into oil dry and pine bark.
 

Anthony

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Re: Prunus Spinosa
« Reply #1 on: April 12, 2014, 01:03 PM »
Sorce,

if I am reading correctly, the aquarium gravel / compost, worked, so why did you change it?

You may not know, but the soil mix we use is the same since 81 or so.
If you see me writing about tests, it is because of curiosity, and so a few test plants are selected, to be experimented on. Not the ones that are closest to being called Bonsai.

Very often those new to Bonsai raise the trouble factor very high, by not working with a single soil mix and a way to water. Then they add on fertiliser problems, as in different types, and often too strong.

The idea behind the three to five years taken to master watering, is to allow for an adjustment, that is is highly individual.
The watering can, for example is still used down here. A hose / water pump and showering head, is for emergencies, when time is short or legs/feet are very tired.

Please take written notes, and hopefully your apprentice will become the second generation to carry on[ after university or similar - Wu Yee Sun ]
Good Day
Anthony

 

Sorce

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Re: Prunus Spinosa
« Reply #2 on: April 12, 2014, 03:42 PM »
After seeing the roots, I was very hesitant to change it. I hope I don't regret it.

I needed something a bit more retentive, as the little ones cant water carefully yet.
This year calls for 10 hours away. Last year was only 7.

I hope to be able to figure a good fert schedule with this mix.

Thank you! I appreciate your tests.

Sorce
 

Anthony

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Re: Prunus Spinosa
« Reply #3 on: April 12, 2014, 06:12 PM »
Sorce,

a little bit for you. A test of a fertiliser called - Blaukorn [ the product information is on Google ]

Needed to find a safe limit for the application of a solid granule of fertiliser [ 12-8-16 have to check this ]
Shape of container 1" x 1" x 2" long, but tapers to 1/2 x 1/2 ", a seed tray with multiple containers.
Subject a young tomato seedling.
Soil mix , basic peatmoss/perlite sterile soil from Canada in bales.

Objective - how much fertiliser to use.
Observation - a granule at this size - O - caused a spurt in growth of a 1" seedling to 2" over a week, and the other seedlings of approximately the same size and % soil stayed around 1"+ with no granules.

This is how the observation was used. A volume of soil [ seed tray ] can be divided into a bonsai pot so many times.
Note also this is mostly a peat mix [ say almost 70% ] organic in nature.
So you can visually average how many beads to place on the bonsai soil for - growth or just maintaining the green of the leaves.

You should be able to duplicate the above and work out a fertiliser schedule.

Using liquid, just do once a week and observe, at 1/2 or 1/3 or 1/4 strength. Most so-called bonsai fertilisers, start with a level around that of composted rapeseed - 5 N.
On our side 5N strength fertiliser watered into moist soils, will maintain, not grow much. But placement is full sun and with breeze, zephyr to knocking over plants.

Also noted on the aquarium gravel / compost situation, you are allowed to increase the organic material for more water retention.

In the past a few beads of an osmocote type bead fertiliser was used in the wet season, lots of rain, not much fertiliser needed, just for other than N.
Good Day
Anthony
 

Herman

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Re: Prunus Spinosa
« Reply #4 on: April 14, 2014, 07:50 AM »
if i had to decide which was cuter,between your youngest apprentice and the sloe, I'd say your youngest "apprentice" ;). cute lil tree too though ;D.

another survivor of life with humans as a bonsai hahaha

I will dare say compost will work well for a prunus, because it will add to the acidity of the soil ? you didnt mention to what mix you changed the soil to ? sieved compost or compost straight out of the bag can be found in 99.99% of south african bonsai soil mixes....I've seen extremely fibrous root systems come out of some of these mixes, this is why I use sieved composted pine bark chips in my mixes :)

best regards
Herman
 

Joshua Hanzman

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Re: Prunus Spinosa
« Reply #5 on: April 14, 2014, 11:23 AM »
Sorce, omg is she a doll, your little helper there seems very intent on working diligently... Ugh, I need to have kids soon, little monkeys hopping around being cute all day... The tree is nice also lol, it has a very good beginning shape to it. Little suggestion, a quick fix I recently realized to add a little retentiveness but not have to do a full repot, add moss to the top of the soil, added bonus is it looks good too!
 

Sorce

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Re: Prunus Spinosa
« Reply #6 on: April 14, 2014, 09:54 PM »
Thanks Anthony.

Herman. It went into Oil-dry. And pine bark.

Josh. People said the same thing about my older son, but his hair was as long as Herman's! ;)

Its currently snowing AGAIN.  >:(

 

Sorce

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Re: Prunus Spinosa
« Reply #7 on: July 11, 2014, 08:58 PM »
I forgot it snowed again after this repot. Helluvah year.

Anyway.

Could have been the snow, or the 75% of the roots I ended up removing, but this is the first growth since these shoots pushed out to about 6-8 leaves from stored energy in the spring.

Finally some growth. I watered everyday like normal. With a little fertilizer a couple times.
Nothing ever died, just a couple brown edges.

Glad it got past the root work, next year should be rewarding.