Author Topic: Spring Seed Plans  (Read 10503 times)

jlushious

  • Full Forum Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 222
Spring Seed Plans
« on: February 06, 2015, 10:00 AM »
Hi All,

Just thought I would share what I have been up to. With winter happening everything is buried in the yard and heaped with snow so there isn't much to do. I did pick up some seeds this past fall and have them stratifying in my fridge. In anticipation of that (and the fact that I have a vegetable garden here too that needs early indoor starting) I have built an indoor grow light shelf.

It gives me space for seed starting, seedling growing (under full spectrum lights) as well as some storage. This will be for my tropicals to live out the winter, start early bonsai seeds as well as my veggie garden starts.

I wrote a whole blog post about the materials I used, but the whole thing cost me $250. Here is a link so you can read into what I did more if you're interested: https://bonsaicalgary.wordpress.com/2015/01/05/indoor-grow-light-shelf-completed/

These are the seeds I have on deck to grow this year, most are zone 2 or 3 (except the JBP, but I just love these little guys, so they may need some extra winter help!). I started red pines last year (also info on my blog about these).

Ussurian pear
American hornbeam
Amur maple
Japanese black pine
Apples
Crabapples

Photo: my shelf with some of my trees and veggie garden stuff (for early indoor eating!). Apologize for the poor lighting.
 

Jerry Norbury

  • Sr. Forum Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 321
  • Thanked: 1 times
Re: Spring Seed Plans
« Reply #1 on: February 06, 2015, 06:31 PM »
Hi

What are the trees with no leaves? They need no light...
 

Dan Douglas

  • Legit New User
  • *
  • Posts: 7
Re: Spring Seed Plans
« Reply #2 on: February 07, 2015, 12:45 AM »
Nice light setup..

I am new to bonsai, and ordered some seeds last fall.
     Baobab
     Japanese Quince
     Cotoneaster

All from seedrack dot com.

The Quince and Cotoneaster are still in the fridge. Of the 5 Baobab seeds I got, I see 2 of them turning bright yellow and shooting roots only after I put them in a warmer spot, about 80 F consistently. (yes, I pulled them out of the soil to check, and now will quit doing that... :- )

Thanks for sharing your blog, I'll have to track that.

Dan
 

jlushious

  • Full Forum Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 222
Re: Spring Seed Plans
« Reply #3 on: February 07, 2015, 11:50 AM »
Jerry, the one I have shown above with no leaves was an oak I was given. It was kept inside because it had previously been inside - I didn't want to shock it by putting it outdoors in the cold temps we get here without being acclimatized to it. I have to say though I am pretty sure it's dead because it hasn't leafed out. I'm just giving it lots of chances (but I think it's just not going to happen)....

Dan, if your house is cool it might be that your seeds could use a heat mat or a warmer place to germinate. I have a freezing house so I used a heat mat least year (not sure if it would apply to your varieties or within your climate but that could help).
 

Jerry Norbury

  • Sr. Forum Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 321
  • Thanked: 1 times
Re: Spring Seed Plans
« Reply #4 on: February 07, 2015, 04:19 PM »
Scratch test.
 

Leo in NE Illinois

  • Sr. Forum Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 303
  • Thanked: 9 times
Re: Spring Seed Plans
« Reply #5 on: February 08, 2015, 12:34 PM »
Hi All,
These are the seeds I have on deck to grow this year, most are zone 2 or 3 (except the JBP, but I just love these little guys, so they may need some extra winter help!). I started red pines last year (also info on my blog about these).

Ussurian pear
American hornbeam
Amur maple
Japanese black pine
Apples
Crabapples

Photo: my shelf with some of my trees and veggie garden stuff (for early indoor eating!). Apologize for the poor lighting.

Nice list of species, If there is time, add Pinus banksiana - Jack Pine - to the list. It is native to Canada and should be fully hardy, it is listed as being the furthest north growing species of pine. It has been used for bonsai by some artists in Montreal and Toronto. You might find it locally in the wild. It is not noted as a high elevation pine, so you wont necessarily find it in the mountains, locally by me in the southern end of its range, we find it in the sand counties, dry soil scrub lands. 
Collected banksiana are notorious for disliking root disturbance, but I would think seedlings would be more tolerant of root disturbance as we are starting out with the whole root system.

American hornbeam and possibly Amur maple may need a warm stratification. If they don't come up spring 2015, just leave the trays out all summer, and the subsequent winter, they can sprout spring 2016.

hornbeam seed ripen early summer, usually July, if planted right away, the remaining summer is enough to meet the warm stratification requirement. This is also true of most maples that ripen seed in late spring or early summer. Maples that don't ripen until fall, don't need warm stratification.

Raising trees from seed is an art unto itself. I am just a novice at it myself.
 

jlushious

  • Full Forum Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 222
Re: Spring Seed Plans
« Reply #6 on: February 08, 2015, 12:55 PM »
Thanks for the comments! I'm originally from the west coast (Vancouver) and the jack pines are all over the place in the mountains up there. I did try collecting a few but they definitely didn't like it! I may try those next year from seed and see how it goes. Spruces do incredibly well here so may try those as well, although there are lots of places to go collect them with a $5 permit, so it might be pointless to try from seed since they're prolific around here.

I will look more into the warm stratification, I had borrowed a copy of Michael Dirk's book to make sure I was cold stratifying far enough in advance, but I had to return it to the library (will have to get it again and read through for those two specifically). Thanks for the advice!