Author Topic: Soil components and ageing root cores  (Read 1294 times)

Anthony

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Soil components and ageing root cores
« on: October 18, 2012, 05:31 AM »
Good morning Group,

I have been slowly going backwards through the General forum, and reading the responses on soil mixes.
I am from the tropics, and things decay just a bit faster than in the colder parts of the world.

My concern is less of the mix [ I use a simple blend of sifted all - crushed earthenware brick, builder's gravel [silica] ] and home made compost/cocopeat ] and more of what happens when your tree ages and requires the pie cuts for dealing with the core of the root zone.
Years ago I had the workbook put out by the Bonsai Farm down at San Antonio, with a section on soil ingredients.
I tried to get the same properties in those unavailable North American ingredients, and anticipate the problems that might come with the core of the root zone.

My idea was an inorganic core, bound with roots, and organic material continuously 'melting' away, being supplied/renewed with compost filtering down from the top.
Yes, the roots would be thickening over time as well at the core.

So soft yellow akadama would be problematic, I guess ?

I also wondered things that are organic, but not decayed like compost, would need nitrogen for the bacteria to digest the pine bark or fir bark or other, so fertilizing would be higher nitrogen ?

Any ideas, comments?

Just in case anyone is wondering, been doing bonsai since 1980 or so. I was 50 as of February, and try to keep learning.
Hopefully, I am not 1 year of beginning bonsai repeated over and over.
Later.
Anthony
 

Anthony

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Re: Soil components and ageing root cores
« Reply #1 on: October 19, 2012, 03:47 AM »
Whoops that should be - unlike compost.

"I also wondered things that are organic, but not decayed, [unlike compost ], would need nitrogen for the bacteria to digest the pine bark or fir bark or other, so fertilizing would be higher nitrogen ?"


Sorry.
Anthony