Author Topic: Cali-Dama gone but not forgotten  (Read 3185 times)

Glenn Van Winkle

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Cali-Dama gone but not forgotten
« on: March 04, 2014, 03:32 PM »
I know that you all have not heard from me in the last four years but that does not mean that I gave up on Cali-Dama. Recently I have aquired 200 tons of material and am currently processing it. I finally have more bonsai soil than I can use in one year. My intention is to introduce Cali-Dama through GSBF. It is good to be back and I will be glad to answer any questions that you may have about my bonsai soil.
 

bwaynef

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Re: Cali-Dama gone but not forgotten
« Reply #1 on: March 04, 2014, 03:47 PM »
When and at what cost can you get some of that to the east coast?
 

Jay

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Re: Cali-Dama gone but not forgotten
« Reply #2 on: March 04, 2014, 04:05 PM »
Glenn... It's good to see you. Last we talked it wasn't Bonsaistudygroup it was BonsaiTalk.
Been awhile, glad to see you are still around and kicking.
Jay
 

Glenn Van Winkle

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Re: Cali-Dama gone but not forgotten
« Reply #3 on: March 05, 2014, 02:05 AM »

Cali-Dama is available to anyone. Unit is a full 5gal nursery can or .4cu ft.
Cosy is $24.00 shiping vi US post is $17.49 any where in continent USA
To jay yes it has been a long time. I have been very busy with trees and will have to post pictures
 

FrankP999

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Re: Cali-Dama gone but not forgotten
« Reply #4 on: March 05, 2014, 11:56 AM »
Where can I order some?

Frank
 

Glenn Van Winkle

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Re: Cali-Dama gone but not forgotten
« Reply #5 on: March 05, 2014, 12:17 PM »
Frank if you call me at 559-269-0082 we will fill your order.
 

pwk5017

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Re: Cali-Dama gone but not forgotten
« Reply #6 on: March 05, 2014, 06:15 PM »
Glenn, I'm interested in a little education. I've heard the term before, and realize it's some type of dried/baked hard pan soil. Other than that, what the heck is this stuff? What are it's basic properties? Is it volcanic in nature like akadama? Is it a true American substitute for akadama or is it "almost as good", but people use it cause it's a heck of a lot cheaper. It doesn't seem to be a main stream soil component--certainly not on the east coast--so I think it might help if you give the ignorant a synopsis of it.
 

Glenn Van Winkle

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Re: Cali-Dama gone but not forgotten
« Reply #7 on: March 06, 2014, 12:00 PM »
Cali-Dama is a natural product of the San Joaquin Valley.layers of sand and clay deposited by rivers on the Valley floor become  hard pan. This material is completely natural and untreated not baked simply crushed and sifted. This material once broken down to the particle size you are going to use in your soil will never dissolve in water or break down to mud or bind back together it will however Absorbe and release water into your soil blend in amanner that is very beneficial to plants and roots Cali-Dama will absorb and release nutrients also it is very conducive to the growth of mycorizia. I started using this product more than 25 years ago and only recently have begun producing quantities large enough to be able to supply other Bonsai artists.Simply stated the stuff works
 

Glenn Van Winkle

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Re: Cali-Dama gone but not forgotten
« Reply #8 on: March 07, 2014, 08:45 PM »
Here's a picture of some black Pines I've grown from seed there approximately 6 years old.
grown inCali-Dama only.
 

Anthony

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Re: Cali-Dama gone but not forgotten
« Reply #9 on: March 08, 2014, 04:48 AM »
Glenn,

I think you have answered the question on my side, our Mayo "stone" is also a deposit of hardened clay and sand. It is used in the production of cement.
I believe it is dynamited out of the hills.

The 3 to 5mm particles absorb water and don't break down in use.

I guess we have Mayo-dama - chuckle.
Thanks a million.
Good Day
Anthony
 

John Kirby

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Re: Cali-Dama gone but not forgotten
« Reply #10 on: March 12, 2014, 08:23 AM »
So you have"Mayo" balls in the tropics? Dama=ball
 

Anthony

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Re: Cali-Dama gone but not forgotten
« Reply #11 on: March 12, 2014, 04:19 PM »
John,

several responses,

[1] I really walked into that one - Mayo [ urban dictionary ] -
"1. a (noun) meaning a man with an overwhelming desire to have an extreme amount of sex. mayos are known to be very well indowed and make excellent boyfriends as well as lovers."

Add on the dama part - ho ho ho.

[2] Mayo - A rural county in the West of Ireland. which is what Mayo in our Central Range is called / named after.

[3] A harderned clay / sand mix, high in calcium oxide.
This zone grows one of the finest beans of the Cacao trees, the other area is in the East Indies.
Drainage in this area is near perfect, even after a heavy shower, the land does not mud the feet. Yet tree crops do very well.

Particles at 5 to 3 mm are very durable, a 4-5 year test pot with a fukien tea, shows no sign of stone degrading. Additionally this test plant is fed on compost, by the teaspoonfuls. These are shapes however, not balls.

Presently tamarinds are being tested with the Mayo "stone".

So feel free to laugh at my ignorance, I did, learn a little about our island, and know that we are very fortunate to have a variety of soil mixes that work well.
Good Day
Anthony
 

John Kirby

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Re: Cali-Dama gone but not forgotten
« Reply #12 on: March 12, 2014, 07:03 PM »
Anthony, I am still chuckling. In the US Mayo normally applies to Mayonaise and Dama in Japanese, well is a ball, Akadama- red ball (literally). Thanks for the humor, sounds like a great medium for growing trees.

I have never believed that Akadama was "magical", but finding a substitute getting it mined and processed and shipped is the hard part.

Good luck with the experiment.

John