Author Topic: Repotting season is underway  (Read 3943 times)

bwaynef

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Re: Repotting season is underway
« Reply #15 on: February 28, 2014, 11:50 AM »
So did you cut the tap and remove the washer?

I really am doing well to have taken these photos.  I'm having some difficulty getting the pictures when I finish. 

Yeah, I left a LITTLE nub but removed all the roots that'd grown through the washer.  I didn't cut it flat against the washer so that it'd stay in place and continue to develop taper and direct the roots outward.
 

John Kirby

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Re: Repotting season is underway
« Reply #16 on: February 28, 2014, 12:43 PM »
It will pop roots on the nub, not sure that is overly important at this point.
 

bwaynef

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Re: Repotting season is underway
« Reply #17 on: February 28, 2014, 01:34 PM »
It will pop roots on the nub, not sure that is overly important at this point.

By the next time I repot, I hope the washer will either be unnecessary or engulfed enough that chopping it flat beneath will be the thing to do.
 

Judy

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Re: Repotting season is underway
« Reply #18 on: February 28, 2014, 03:56 PM »
You have been BUSY!  Me, just playing the waiting game now...
Nice to see all your work.
 

Gaffer

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Re: Repotting season is underway
« Reply #19 on: February 28, 2014, 08:43 PM »
We are way ahead in Qualicum . My forsythia's are in their full glory. If I could ever figure out how to send a pic you guys would be proud.
Qualicum Brian
 

bwaynef

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Re: Repotting season is underway
« Reply #20 on: March 04, 2014, 09:07 AM »
I don't have any pictures to illustrate, but I've been repotting a few chinese elm seedlings that were grown in a flat of turface for (at least) a year and in a 4" pot for another year.  Similar treatment of japanese & Trident maple, as well as Carolina Hornbeam have yielded a range of different qualities of roots, with most having the potential for above average nebari.  Not so with Chinese elm.  I culled several last night, deciding to keep only 2 (of 6, maybe 8).

Is there a secret to managing Chinese elm roots from seedling?  Or is the nebari built on those sweet little shohin Chinese Elms thru layering?