Author Topic: Repotting Menagerie  (Read 5013 times)

Steven

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Repotting Menagerie
« on: February 24, 2010, 07:59 PM »
Here are some pics of various trees I repotted today. First is a Korean Hornbeam, second is a Trident Maple(Matt O.'s fav LOL) and an American Hornbeam.
 The KHB I am attempting ROR with. After exploring the roots to see how the thick ones were growing I could see a nice opening for a rock I've had sitting around. In one of the pics you can see the top of my crude wrap job. I needed a 2nd person but didn't see anyone around so had to do the best I could.
 

Steven

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Re: Repotting Menagerie
« Reply #1 on: February 24, 2010, 08:01 PM »
more pics of the KHB
 

Steven

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Re: Repotting Menagerie
« Reply #2 on: February 24, 2010, 08:07 PM »
This here is an outright ugly Trident. Probably most would think it would look better in the compost but hey it's mine. Matt just loves it  ;D ask him. This one needed a repot bad as you can see by the rootball.
 

Steven

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Re: Repotting Menagerie
« Reply #3 on: February 24, 2010, 08:10 PM »
more pics
 

Steven

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Re: Repotting Menagerie
« Reply #4 on: February 24, 2010, 08:12 PM »
more
 

Steven

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Re: Repotting Menagerie
« Reply #5 on: February 24, 2010, 08:17 PM »
Last for now is this AHB. This one was fun(sarcasm). The roots on this tree were heavily encircled at the bottom. Took a bit but got them worked out. Then it got better...found the old cut underneath and it wasn't a flush straight one either. Spent some time locating a safe place to recut it and cutback horizontal protruding roots(thick ones). After all that and sealing the cuts got it potted in the collander.
 

Steven

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Re: Repotting Menagerie
« Reply #6 on: February 24, 2010, 08:18 PM »
This one shows some orchid moss for moisture retention.
 

Jerry Norbury

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Re: Repotting Menagerie
« Reply #7 on: February 25, 2010, 02:34 AM »
You could chop  (or even airlayer) that trident and have two FAR less ugly trees...
 

Steven

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Re: Repotting Menagerie
« Reply #8 on: February 25, 2010, 06:02 AM »
That was one of the ideas mentioned by Matt. This one will be my experiment tree. I'm going to thread graft first and see what happens. Just need to find some good, really cheap seedlings.
 

Jay

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Re: Repotting Menagerie
« Reply #9 on: February 25, 2010, 06:15 AM »
Steven, if you are looking to thread graft, you can just let a couple of branches grow wild this year. Then next year bend the long whips back around and through the area (after you drill the hole) you wish to have the graft. I realize this is waiting a year but you could be working on other parts of the tree in the mean time.

Jay
 

Steven

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Re: Repotting Menagerie
« Reply #10 on: February 25, 2010, 07:02 AM »
I know Jay, thank you. Waiting is not a problem. The root work and repot is done(even though it's potted back in the same pot) now I will wait 4-6 weeks then start feeding it well and let it grow uninhibited. After a yr and I see it still needs to grow more(top) I'll see about eliminating a few of those ugly roots that jut out here and there.
 

rockm

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Re: Repotting Menagerie
« Reply #11 on: February 25, 2010, 09:13 AM »
I'd skip the rock under the hornbeam. The tree's nebari is already developed beyond its ability to gracefully blend with the the stone. The stone also looks a bit to small to visually support the tree. It's long horizontal profile doesn't really help either.

Rocks have to be integrated early in a bonsai's life to work effectively with the tree. A rock essentially becomes part of the tree's trunk as it ages, both physically and visually.
 

Steven

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Re: Repotting Menagerie
« Reply #12 on: February 25, 2010, 09:34 AM »
Thanks for your opinion rockm. I hate the trees current nebari and I'm hoping to correct it. There are nice smaller roots underneath the older, thicker ones to better form around the rock. This tree will also be shortened considerably. Will do airlayers on the tree down the road. Irene gave me good points to where I can apply these airlayers some time back. I'm not looking for instant gratification on these trees. I'm trying to get them healthy and if possible start them in the direction I want them to go. Where you see this tree leaning to the right in the pics I can tell you there were zero roots on the left side of the base and the rest of the base the roots are not ideal to me. But I just couldn't remove all large roots. I need to wait til the smaller finer roots develop better.
 

rockm

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Re: Repotting Menagerie
« Reply #13 on: February 25, 2010, 10:34 AM »
I guess, I don't understand then. Placing the tree on a rock will not aid in developing roots, it will slow that process down. New roots will not do anything to correct the already-present nebari swell that makes this combination awkward...

Nebari correction on a tree like that would usually entail air layering above the old root mass.
 

John Kirby

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Re: Repotting Menagerie
« Reply #14 on: February 25, 2010, 10:41 AM »
Steve, manipulations like this tend to make things worse not better, Rock is just saying it nicer than me. I have meesed up trees like this before, it will give you something to remember, but not a good root base, nor tree and rock combination.

As I always say, it is your tree and you will and should do what you like, but there are ways to do it well.

John