Author Topic: Bonsai pottery  (Read 3419 times)

Brian Van Fleet

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Re: Bonsai pottery
« Reply #15 on: January 22, 2013, 05:32 PM »
"Tough to do with American pots because they're relatively newer...haven't really even seen one with what I'd consider to be a good patina...though several potters are well positioned to get there..."

I've found it's not all that tough to do, especially with North American collected trees. I put a flattop bald cypress in a big Ron Lang oval that works pretty well. The wood fired pot, although only ten years old or so, is developing some patina, but I think it worked well from the start.

American and European potters know they can't really compete with older Japanese pots' age, so they're working with glazes that look old or weathered to begin with. In extreme cases, those glazes can look odd, but done well, they're very easy to use with older trees.

I meant match an old American pot to an old tree, as you're not likely to find a 50-100 year old American pot.  I like the sentiment of American trees in American pots, so long as its the best pairing for the composition.  Usually it requires a potter to have the confidence to move beyond making the "look at me" pottery; just my opinion.  Several have begun to do this quite well.
 

bwaynef

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Re: Bonsai pottery
« Reply #16 on: January 22, 2013, 05:43 PM »
Usually it requires a potter to have the confidence to move beyond making the "look at me" pottery; just my opinion. 

What do you mean by "look at me" pottery?  Any examples ...or is the bonsai community too small?