Author Topic: Questions for any fertilizer chemists out there.  (Read 6634 times)

Larry Gockley

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Re: Questions for any fertilizer chemists out there.
« Reply #15 on: July 29, 2009, 08:49 AM »
Thanks for all the great response guys. But can someone explain to me why , mathematically, adding 8-0-0. to 4-12-4, ferts does not come out to 12-12-4?  Larry
 

andy graham

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Re: Questions for any fertilizer chemists out there.
« Reply #16 on: July 29, 2009, 09:07 AM »
You would get an average of the numbers. You're adding "filler" just as much as NPK. You'd end up with a 6-6-2 if you added equal amounts of both.

Andy
 

rockm

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Re: Questions for any fertilizer chemists out there.
« Reply #17 on: July 29, 2009, 09:20 AM »
"However, I also use a mychorizea innoculent "myke" with all my trees. Several nurseries in the area have endorsed this product and will extend their warranty from 2 to 5 years if transplanted with the stuff. One thing it mentions is that it is only good with organic ferts, bogus!! It works regardless of ferts used and perhaps the latter is because most of our ferts are washed away. Although not as evident as with conifers all have the growth in the soil."

Adding myc to soil is an inexact thing. One myc, or even a dozen types, will not guarantee the stuff takes to the plant it's been added to. There are more than one type of myc fungus. Most are species specific, apparently. Nurseries will extend warranties if you use it, as they sell myc--and it's not inexpensive.

Myc does help. However, I think yhe best way to get the appropriate kind is to simply wait (the "right" myc can--and does--show up on its own), or to use an "innoculant" soil sample from a known carrier plant of the same species at repotting.

Also, there is evidence that heavy fertilizer use can inhibit development of myc colonies in a container.

http://cropsoil.psu.edu/sylvia/mycorrhiza.htm
 

Rick Moquin

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Re: Questions for any fertilizer chemists out there.
« Reply #18 on: July 29, 2009, 12:15 PM »
Adding myc to soil is an inexact thing. One myc, or even a dozen types, will not guarantee the stuff takes to the plant it's been added to. There are more than one type of myc fungus. Most are species specific, apparently. Nurseries will extend warranties if you use it, as they sell myc--and it's not inexpensive.

I'm not going to deny that, all I know is that whatever is in that blue tub works, and no it is not cheap.
Quote
Myc does help. However, I think yhe best way to get the appropriate kind is to simply wait (the "right" myc can--and does--show up on its own), or to use an "innoculant" soil sample from a known carrier plant of the same species at repotting.

... easier said than done. Been there done that and bought the T-shirt. I do not need a same cultivar host plant as this stuff works regardless of species, and no it is not occurring naturally, at least not in the past.
 

bonsaikc

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Re: Questions for any fertilizer chemists out there.
« Reply #19 on: July 29, 2009, 04:19 PM »
You can make the fertilizer cakes out of just about anything. We use Fish meal, cottonseed meal, alfalfa meal, blood meal, bone meal, flour, wall paper glue and fish emulsion- because we have easy inexpensive access to all of this stuff. Just need a hot dry day when I am home.  John

Hey John, what proportions do you use on these? I've been using bone meal, blood meal, cottonseed meal, lime, etc. (Persiano's recipe) and haven't been happy with the results this year. I'm getting some black slime and think it's from these cakes. Really, wallpaper paste? I thougt the flour was supposed to bind them.

Chris
 

Billkcmo

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Re: Questions for any fertilizer chemists out there.
« Reply #20 on: July 29, 2009, 04:36 PM »
I was always told that if you use pine bark in your potting mix or a small amount of the potting soil your pines are growing in you will have Mychorizea.  Bill
 

Rick Moquin

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Re: Questions for any fertilizer chemists out there.
« Reply #21 on: July 29, 2009, 08:34 PM »
Bill,

PLease read Dale's post on Poo Balls. Yes you can take pine mychorizae and use it in a repoted pine and it will colonise that pot. What I may not have been clear on was, a few years back the discussion was that mychorizae occurred naturally with conifers, especially pines etc... use a little in repots and woila. As Dale mentions he also uses an inoculant in his mix that covers a variety of species.

Myke is pretty much the same I am getting mychorizae in all my pots, which I wasn't getting before. In all honesty I really don't care if folks use it or not, whatever works for you. I shared a titbit of info that is all.