Author Topic: Pictures in the Sierras  (Read 2546 times)

Yenling83

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Pictures in the Sierras
« on: January 12, 2012, 08:20 PM »
I decided to try out this new image resize function.  Here's some pictures I've taken up in the Sierras, hope you like them.
 

Yenling83

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Re: Pictures in the Sierras
« Reply #1 on: January 12, 2012, 08:21 PM »
There are some more on my blog yenlingbonsai.com
 

Yenling83

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Re: Pictures in the Sierras
« Reply #2 on: January 12, 2012, 08:22 PM »
Wish I could go up there now, too bad everything's under several feet of snow.
 

MatsuBonsai

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Re: Pictures in the Sierras
« Reply #3 on: January 12, 2012, 08:36 PM »
I decided to try out this new image resize function.  Here's some pictures I've taken up in the Sierras, hope you like them.


Seems to be working well.  Thanks for sharing. 

"Black Mountain is the highest natural point in the Commonwealth of Kentucky, USA, with a summit elevation of 4145 feet (1263 m) above mean sea level"  -  jealous.
 

jtucker

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Re: Pictures in the Sierras
« Reply #4 on: January 12, 2012, 11:15 PM »
Great inspirations! The orange flowers are indeed called Indian Paintbrush... there are several native species in the castilleja family. There are some small pink ones in that family commonly called Owl's Clover, as well. As best I can make out from the photo, the tall skinny ones with the blue-ish purple-ish flowers look like Blue Dicks or Wild Onion. Hopefully that gives you a jumping off point.

I love the idea of using California natives for accents (and bonsai, too!). The problem with a lot of our best looking accent type plants is that they are usually very particular about when they germinate. A very large portion of the most beautiful of California's plants only show themselves after a fire has swept through the area. I remember after the horrible fires of 2003 that burned a good portion of San Diego county, I saw a patch of Leopard Lilies http://calphotos.berkeley.edu/cgi-bin/img_query?rel-taxon=contains&where-taxon=Lilium+pardalinum for the first and only time in my life. Stuff I'd only seen in books or internet databases was popping up all over the place!

It would be great to have a champion for these plants... I'm still working on native trees and shrubs for bonsai, much less the touchier accents! Would the strategy be to collect just before a show or to try and keep accent plants in cultivation? I don't know anything about this aspect of the art.

Thanks for the posts, Yenling!

Jason
 

Don Blackmond

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Re: Pictures in the Sierras
« Reply #5 on: January 13, 2012, 07:31 AM »
Great photos.  Looks like some fantastic hiking.  I'm jealous, and really wish I had close by access to that kind of topography and scenery. 

(also, I really like the auto-resize feature; its a super idea).
 

mcpesq817

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Re: Pictures in the Sierras
« Reply #6 on: January 13, 2012, 09:14 AM »
Wish I could go up there now, too bad everything's under several feet of snow.

Great photos - looks like this one could go right into a pot :D

Kudos to the BSG team on the new resize function too.
 

Yenling83

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Re: Pictures in the Sierras
« Reply #7 on: January 13, 2012, 11:44 AM »
Great inspirations! The orange flowers are indeed called Indian Paintbrush... there are several native species in the castilleja family. There are some small pink ones in that family commonly called Owl's Clover, as well. As best I can make out from the photo, the tall skinny ones with the blue-ish purple-ish flowers look like Blue Dicks or Wild Onion. Hopefully that gives you a jumping off point.

I love the idea of using California natives for accents (and bonsai, too!). The problem with a lot of our best looking accent type plants is that they are usually very particular about when they germinate. A very large portion of the most beautiful of California's plants only show themselves after a fire has swept through the area. I remember after the horrible fires of 2003 that burned a good portion of San Diego county, I saw a patch of Leopard Lilies http://calphotos.berkeley.edu/cgi-bin/img_query?rel-taxon=contains&where-taxon=Lilium+pardalinum for the first and only time in my life. Stuff I'd only seen in books or internet databases was popping up all over the place!

It would be great to have a champion for these plants... I'm still working on native trees and shrubs for bonsai, much less the touchier accents! Would the strategy be to collect just before a show or to try and keep accent plants in cultivation? I don't know anything about this aspect of the art.

Thanks for the posts, Yenling!

Jason

Thanks for the reply Jason! I have been really getting into CA natives lately.  I guess i've been cheating a little lately because I’ve been spending lots of time at this nursery that sells nothing but CA natives http://www.laspilitas.com/  It's family owned and operated and the father has been doing it since the 1970's.  Best selection I've seen anywhere!  The father and daughter have been giving me tips on how I might grow CA natives.  So the strategy is to keep them in cultivation.  Some have died, but other have lived-I guess only more time will tell.  There's actually a branch of Las piliatas in Escondito not to far from you.  Hard Core CA native enthusiasts will likely think you are crazy at first for wanting to grow them in tiny pots and on rocks-but they should warm up eventually.

Aren’t most species used for Bonsai Japanese Natives?  I've found several species I am growing out from seed, cutting and air layer or collecting, here’s some of them, there are generally pictures of these on the las pilitas site:

Conifer:
*Sierra, CA, Utah Juniper
*Engelmann Spruce
*Ponderosa Pine
*Bishop Pine

Deciduous:
*Mountain Maple- Acer glabrum
*Holly Leaf Cherry- Prunus ilicifolia
*Sierra Plum- Prunus subcordata
*Desert Peach- Prunus andersonii
 

jtucker

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Re: Pictures in the Sierras
« Reply #8 on: January 14, 2012, 12:08 PM »
Love Las Pilitas! The lady there knows me as the bonsai guy. She thought I was nuts when I bought a couple 5gal White Alders that were about 10ft tall and 3in. around then sawed em off to fit in my car! I'm working a Joyce Coulter Ceanothus as a full cascade (will try and take some pics when it flowers in a month or so), several different oak species, Jeffrey Pine (the bark on mature trees smells like butterscotch!), and chamise (adenostoma fasciculatum).

Check out Growing California Native Plants by Marjorie Schmidt if you get the chance. I bought it back when I first started getting into natives. It's a little bit older book, but it has a ton of info on propagation, species by species.

Happy hunting, it's almost digging season down here!
« Last Edit: January 14, 2012, 12:11 PM by jtucker »
 

Jeff Lahr

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Re: Pictures in the Sierras
« Reply #9 on: January 17, 2012, 09:52 PM »
Hey Yenling,
Great Photos. Thanks for sharing. I've been to Las Pilitas a couple of times. For about twenty years I've had four pretty large native gardens at the school where I work. Each year a small handful of students become "Extreme Gardeners" and work in the gardens once a week at lunch time. Usually we get our plants from Native Sons (they oftendonate them). There is a fairly new native garden nursery in Solvang.

Oh yeah, we also have a Japanese garden at school with a small maple. a thunerhead JBP, a couple of nandina variets and some bamboo. In March we'll be having our annual bonsai seminar. Hopefully George Muranaka will come lend a hand. You're welcome too if you're not working.