Author Topic: Peter Tea's rebuilding a maple.  (Read 6784 times)

akeppler

  • Sr. Forum Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 409
  • Thanked: 9 times
  • http://bonsaial.wordpress.com/
Re: Peter Tea's rebuilding a maple.
« Reply #15 on: June 06, 2012, 03:30 PM »

Al, when being specious and covetous, as you appear to be, one should eschew grammatical obfuscation. ;)



Specious?, hardly, been on these forums way too long to be superficial. My body of work and coverage of it speaks for itself. I covet nothing, though am occasionally resentful ;D

It was not my intention to espouse elucidation. Wayne knows exactly what I said........otherwise he wouldn't have commented on it.

It's still about perception.

This back and fourth is not about "what" I posted...

It's about "who" posted it.

My post did not try to take anything from Peters blog but only offered a simple sidebar into how to hold a graft onto a branch with something as ordinary as a pushpin rather then a hardware store in Nagoya. I think sometimes with your professor mentality and ability to galavant all around the world that there are some of us that practise bonsai in our back yards and couldn't care less that the Japanese use a nail with a plastic bead on it. There are other things that will work.

Whether Boon does it or not additionally does not matter to me. I am not so naive as to think that this is something new or innovative. Bonsai has been around for a long time and I am sure there will be plenty of trends in the future after you and I are dust. The article by Urushibata, I have not seen, map pins, havn't seen them used in a magazine nor by you. Doesn't mean they don't exist. I just ain't seen them.

As a collector of Roman coins and more recently the coinage of the Greek Empire, I read lots of books on the two as well as ancient cultures around the world. What I find fascinateing is that many cultures around the world went thru the iron age and the bronze age at exactly the same time and every culture on Earth has found "gold" to be the one true meaning of wealth. Showing that when given the opportunity to use ones brain many people independent of each other can come up with identical ideas about how to do things.

I did not come here and hijack someones thread, I offered "one" solution to the unavailability of a Japanese product. Nothing else. I have no idea what Boon had to do with all this? Do you?

Perception again possibly?

One things for sure, this is the most action around here for months. At least since my Boon mix challenge ;D
« Last Edit: June 06, 2012, 03:33 PM by akeppler »
 

Larry Gockley

  • Sr. Forum Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 275
  • Thanked: 1 times
Re: Peter Tea's rebuilding a maple.
« Reply #16 on: June 06, 2012, 06:23 PM »
Hi Al. I had a bit of a chuckle when I saw your pic using push pins. Here is a Bald Cypress I collected two months ago, and I used push pins to hold the branches in a downward angle. Did not really want to wire as there are 25 or 30 branches. Larry
 

Owen Reich

  • Hero Forum Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 888
  • Thanked: 7 times
Re: Peter Tea's rebuilding a maple.
« Reply #17 on: June 06, 2012, 06:31 PM »
Peter's blog is my favorite to read due to his fairly scientific approach to documenting long-term projects and getting people thinking (and talking) about techniques and tricks.  A few months ago, I learned you can cut aluminum foil a few times with a pair of scissors to get a quick, but not necessarily sustainable, sharp edge.  Peter was the first person I told.  I know how much effort goes into making consistent blog posts as an apprentice.

Probably the main reason I follow and try to help on this forum is the lack of drama and focus on the positive.

In Bonsai Art of Japan episode 25 (YouTube), I used two pieces of rubber and aluminum wire.  I'm used to grafting rubber bands although the push-pins sound a hell of a lot easier.  Lots of ways to make it happen.
 

akeppler

  • Sr. Forum Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 409
  • Thanked: 9 times
  • http://bonsaial.wordpress.com/
Re: Peter Tea's rebuilding a maple.
« Reply #18 on: June 06, 2012, 07:20 PM »
I agree. I have been posting my personal work on the forums for over 13 years now. I am no professional, but I have had somewhat of a following for a number of years because I like to shoot pictures and detail projects with progressions. Always have and will continue long into the future.

I have three blogs on the net. No one knows about them. I just never post to them. I feel a forum is a much better place to share and offer tid bits of information. Use what you like and forget the rest, but everyone has something to offer.

Like the soil thread and the product from Murayama nursery in Sacramento. That is some really great stuff and I wish there was a cheap way to get it around the USA.

"Help" is my middle name. Allthough my other middle name, "social sledgehammer" makes an appearance in some circles.
 

akeppler

  • Sr. Forum Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 409
  • Thanked: 9 times
  • http://bonsaial.wordpress.com/
Re: Peter Tea's rebuilding a maple.
« Reply #19 on: June 06, 2012, 07:24 PM »
   A few months ago, I learned you can cut aluminum foil a few times with a pair of scissors to get a quick, but not necessarily sustainable, sharp edge.  Peter was the first person I told.  

Make your cuts thru a piece of 200 grit emery cloth and you won't even need to sharpen them.
 

0soyoung

  • Full Forum Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 149
  • Thanked: 4 times
Re: Peter Tea's rebuilding a maple.
« Reply #20 on: June 06, 2012, 07:46 PM »
Why not use raffia or vet-wrap or even a loop(s) of wire instead of nailing/pinning? Isn't the 'point' to just hold the scion in place? Or is there some voodoo magic involved?
 

akeppler

  • Sr. Forum Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 409
  • Thanked: 9 times
  • http://bonsaial.wordpress.com/
Re: Peter Tea's rebuilding a maple.
« Reply #21 on: June 06, 2012, 07:55 PM »
Why not? Whatever gets the job done right.

Spent about twenty m inutes out in the garage finding the kids bead kit, cut off some finish nails and put a bead on it and what do you know looks just like the Japanese version. I am sure that I could probably find the bead in Peters post with a trip to Michaels.

I still think a pushpin is easier. Whatever blows your skirt up I always say.
 

John Kirby

  • Hero Forum Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2216
  • Thanked: 16 times
  • I really need an opposable thumb...
Re: Peter Tea's rebuilding a maple.
« Reply #22 on: June 06, 2012, 11:56 PM »
Al, you are who you are. I always enjoy the banter. I am sure that Peter will be excited to hear he can get the supplies he needs when he returns through Michael's.  I am starting to hear a little Vance Wood in some of your posts, you may want to add a pithy quote to you signature line, a la Vance like "the only finished bonsai is a dead bonsai" Me, 1982. It will help everyone to grasp the crochety/grumpy old man status that you claim.

You got any finished trees? (see above)

 

akeppler

  • Sr. Forum Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 409
  • Thanked: 9 times
  • http://bonsaial.wordpress.com/
Re: Peter Tea's rebuilding a maple.
« Reply #23 on: June 07, 2012, 12:01 AM »
Yep. Finished this one last year ;D

Believe it or not, it took me seven years  to finish it. Slow and painful.
« Last Edit: June 07, 2012, 12:05 AM by akeppler »
 

John Kirby

  • Hero Forum Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2216
  • Thanked: 16 times
  • I really need an opposable thumb...
Re: Peter Tea's rebuilding a maple.
« Reply #24 on: June 07, 2012, 06:45 AM »
Maybe we should start a newq q torqued oqnq "finished trees"1, Catlin elms didn't take well to our move east......
 

MatsuBonsai

  • John Callaway
  • Administrator
  • Hero Forum Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1398
  • Thanked: 6 times
Re: Peter Tea's rebuilding a maple.
« Reply #25 on: June 07, 2012, 07:19 AM »
When you start posting mushrooms then I'll really be worried.
 

John Kirby

  • Hero Forum Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2216
  • Thanked: 16 times
  • I really need an opposable thumb...
Re: Peter Tea's rebuilding a maple.
« Reply #26 on: June 07, 2012, 09:43 AM »
I had a good cluster of mycorrhizal fruiting bodies on a black pine the other day as I was doing a soil surface cleaning (aka weeding  ;), unlike Al I am not reliable with a camera, I tend to leave them places that they shouldn't be, think irrigation.
 

nathanbs

  • Sr. Forum Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 370
  • Thanked: 2 times
Re: Peter Tea's rebuilding a maple.
« Reply #27 on: June 07, 2012, 10:02 AM »
Now that the dust has settled ill kick my feet around a little. Al I dont think the information either you or Peter provided is necessarily right or wrong, both great ideas in my opinion. I didnt read Peter saying or Boon saying that they invented this technique, however you seem to be very proud of your idea as if it was your own(maybe it was to you)however many others have thought of the same thing. At the end of it all it is "the social sledgehammer" that is the issue. You come off as being very rude and offensive to those who do not know you(me) and probably those who do know you as well. As Owen said this is a very enjoyable forum without much in the way of controversy. Please share your ideas as some of them are great even if they are not all original as a newbie like me may have yet to have heard of your trick. But maybe try being more of a "social rubber mallet".  Sorry that i didnt pull out my dictionary to write this comment, my vocabulary is like my personality, simple but to the point.
 

John Kirby

  • Hero Forum Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2216
  • Thanked: 16 times
  • I really need an opposable thumb...
Re: Peter Tea's rebuilding a maple.
« Reply #28 on: June 07, 2012, 10:37 AM »
Can't completely blame Al, I should have read his post on the computer and not my cell phone........ He and I actually get along pretty well, even when we needle each other. He is pretty talented for a guy from Fresno.
 

akeppler

  • Sr. Forum Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 409
  • Thanked: 9 times
  • http://bonsaial.wordpress.com/
Re: Peter Tea's rebuilding a maple.
« Reply #29 on: June 07, 2012, 07:42 PM »
Now that the dust has settled ill kick my feet around a little. Al I dont think the information either you or Peter provided is necessarily right or wrong, both great ideas in my opinion. I didnt read Peter saying or Boon saying that they invented this technique, however you seem to be very proud of your idea as if it was your own(maybe it was to you)however many others have thought of the same thing. At the end of it all it is "the social sledgehammer" that is the issue. You come off as being very rude and offensive to those who do not know you(me) and probably those who do know you as well. As Owen said this is a very enjoyable forum without much in the way of controversy. Please share your ideas as some of them are great even if they are not all original as a newbie like me may have yet to have heard of your trick. But maybe try being more of a "social rubber mallet".  Sorry that i didnt pull out my dictionary to write this comment, my vocabulary is like my personality, simple but to the point.

If you don't mind...please scroll to the top of the page and quote any part of my opening remarks that would lead anyone to believe that Peter or I invented the use of holding down a scion to a branch in preperation to be grafted.

Thank you, Al

Everything after my opening remarks is defensive. No one said "thank you, great idea", just pissing and moaning. Why am I the bad guy in your remarks?