Author Topic: Myconox mycorrhizal fungi  (Read 5023 times)

Kajukid

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Myconox mycorrhizal fungi
« on: October 24, 2011, 11:53 AM »
okay so Stone Lantern sells  Myconox mycorrhizal fungi and i was reading in the Bonsai today book about Pines and it says to use the it when replanting pines....do u think i should use it??
 

Yenling83

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Re: Myconox mycorrhizal fungi
« Reply #1 on: October 24, 2011, 12:03 PM »
I think you can go a head and use it, it may or may not be beneficial but I don't think it will hurt.  From my experience in using a product like that, the type of soil and repotting properly is much more important then a product like this.  JBP roots will be covered in Mycorrhiza if you use a good soil mix, full sun, fertilize and water correctly. 
 

John Kirby

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Re: Myconox mycorrhizal fungi
« Reply #2 on: October 24, 2011, 12:04 PM »
Um, do your pines have mycorrhizae? That is the white filamentous material growing in the pot. My general answer is no. John
 

Kajukid

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Re: Myconox mycorrhizal fungi
« Reply #3 on: October 24, 2011, 12:11 PM »
Um, do your pines have mycorrhizae? That is the white filamentous material growing in the pot. My general answer is no. John
no i dont think they do.......they didnt have them when i bought them...they are still young trees....i got them in 4" pots....the reason i asked this question is because i am going to grow some pines from seeds...
 

rockm

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Re: Myconox mycorrhizal fungi
« Reply #4 on: October 24, 2011, 03:34 PM »
It will probably hurt your wallet and not your trees.

The real issue here is whether the myc is a needless expense. It probably is,IMO. Myc is species-specific, with some species colonizing some trees and not others. If the mix has the pine-specific fungus, then great. If not = added unnecessary expense. Even if it is the "right" fungus, your pines will most likely "find" the right myc by themselves after some time in a container. Myc spores, like many other fungi, are everywhere. Eventually, one that likes pines and vice versa, will find its way into your soil. Again, buying the spores is not really necessary...The nursery industry has seized on myc as a money-maker. It's not a miracle product.

 

Treebeard55

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Re: Myconox mycorrhizal fungi
« Reply #5 on: October 24, 2011, 05:03 PM »
Rock, I have to respectfully disagree, at least partly. I've seen a real difference in the amount of mycorrhizae present when I used an inoculant, versus when I didn't. And the mycorrhizae do make a difference in a tree's ability to withstand adverse conditions, in my experience.

To me, it's a worthwhile expense, as long as I'm buying from a reputable dealer. Most inoculants I've seen contain spores for 6 or 8 different species; the appropriate one(s) will colonize a tree's roots.

It's your money, Kid, and your decision.
 

MatsuBonsai

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Re: Myconox mycorrhizal fungi
« Reply #6 on: October 24, 2011, 05:11 PM »
 

John Kirby

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Re: Myconox mycorrhizal fungi
« Reply #7 on: October 24, 2011, 06:12 PM »
Water more. My JBP have had it growing out over the lip of the pot. If you bare root your trees into sterile medium, then I would suggest adding it. Otherwise. Steve, did the trees you didn't add it to (at the same time you did to some) do worse? Or did you innoculate all of your trees and they did better?
 

Adair M

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Re: Myconox mycorrhizal fungi
« Reply #8 on: October 24, 2011, 08:44 PM »
When I root pruned one of my JBPs last spring, I threw some of the old soil with the fungi back into the pot, to inocculate the new soil.  I don't know if that's a good procedure, but the tree didn't seem to be affected by the root pruning at all.
 

Treebeard55

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Re: Myconox mycorrhizal fungi
« Reply #9 on: October 24, 2011, 09:13 PM »
... Steve, did the trees you didn't add it to (at the same time you did to some) do worse? ...

The ones that weren't inoculated did OK, but the ones that were performed a lot better -- especially, as I alluded to, when it came to resisting adverse conditions.
 

rockm

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Re: Myconox mycorrhizal fungi
« Reply #10 on: October 25, 2011, 01:36 PM »
"Rock, I have to respectfully disagree, at least partly. I've seen a real difference in the amount of mycorrhizae present when I used an inoculant, versus when I didn't. And the mycorrhizae do make a difference in a tree's ability to withstand adverse conditions, in my experience."

All due respect, I never said myc wasn't good, just that the expensive over-the-counter stuff is mostly a needless expense.

All my trees that need myc have it--pines, oaks, and hornbeam. I didn't pay for it. It showed up by itself :)
No outlay of cash was required.
 

Gary S

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Re: Myconox mycorrhizal fungi
« Reply #11 on: December 09, 2011, 10:56 AM »
Does anyone know the name of the specific type of mycorrhiza for Japanese White Pines?

I planted 2 JWP from Monrovia Nursery in CA, and the roots were covered in white from the mycorrhiza. They even
advertise it's use:

http://www.monrovia.com/about-us/press-releases/48/monrovia-organics-soil-mixes-fertilizers