Author Topic: Lava Rock and Pumice  (Read 7485 times)

Judy

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Re: Lava Rock and Pumice
« Reply #15 on: December 07, 2013, 08:16 AM »
awwww.   :'(  Well, keep us posted when you do get it!
 

Anthony

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Re: Lava Rock and Pumice
« Reply #16 on: December 07, 2013, 06:38 PM »
Owen,

this may be a really dumb suggestion, so please bear with me. When we were sourcing soils for use in Bonsai, all we did was pull a geological map of Trinidad and look.

Our porous fired clay exists naturally as porcellainite in the Erin area, it is actually mined for secondary road usage. It is clay fired naturally underground to around 700 deg.C
Porous and hard, but with time will breakdown with use in pots.
[ We have re-fired it to 980 deg.C and it becomes porous but does not break down ]

Melauj [ spelling?] some sort of deposit of what we use as builder's gravel, silica based. Can be had crushed or along the northern river banks as rounded pebbles.

Mayo stone [ used to manufacture cement ] at anything under 5 mm it is extremely durable and we have trees growing in it, with no problems.

Crushed blue stone [ I believe a dirtied magnesium / calcium limestone ] which we still have to test, but where it comes from everything grows on it.

There are other stones, but we didn't have to look any further for as you know, we use just crushed porous red brick and builder's gravel.
We have also tested glass marbles for pitching and compost, leca [ expanded hydroponic clay ] and compost and presently testing glass marbles at 10 mm in size.

The only failure we had was 100% crushed red brick, and that seemed to keep the test subject too wet. Could probably redo as 100% brick in an earthenware or cement pot, and make use of the porosity.

No geologists to lend aid for Tennessee?

We [ as other Trinidadians ] watch you guys with such a large landmass, searching and searching, and wonder why?
Trinidad is supposed to be around Deleware's size [ say less than 50 miles square ] and we can make soils that work, surely you guys can come up with local soil mixes from area to area, by asking geologists for help?
AND get those amazing costs $$$$$$$ down.
Good Day
Anthony

Serissa in a coarse mix of crushed red brick, with compost/peatmoss/perlite growing for new plants, for the roots with shoots.
Sorry about the rhyme.
 

Joshua Hanzman

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Re:
« Reply #17 on: December 09, 2013, 08:04 AM »
Ok, So I've been toying with getting brown and black pumice from someone local and i am adding the cost of delivery, its looking like i can get this done at about five hundred a ton delivered smack dab outside your house in a ton bag. The look of the black and brown is phenomenal, and it seems as if its high fired dirt or something, feels almost, idk, its hard but at the same time is not as sharp as the gray? I would really need people to be serious about buying it, because i will be sticking my neck out for the up front $ and basically trusting everyone to keep their words. Which as long s as you say you'll buy, I'll trust ya! Except if you don't, I'm screwed :)  please respond if
1) your on the east coast or one state in
2) you will buy this substrate @ 500 a ton, 375 ahalf ton, 225 a quarter ton

This is for black and brown pumice with sizes ranging from 3-6 mm, or slightly larger than 1/8"-1/4"

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augustine

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Re: Lava Rock and Pumice
« Reply #18 on: December 09, 2013, 09:43 AM »
Owen,

I get a product called "Dry Stall" from the farm supply store. It is used for absorption in a horse stall. It's pure pumice.

I pay $18 for 40lbs, retail price, but I do not need lots of it. (I think there is another product called "Stall Dry" or similar which is NOT pumice.)

Best,

Augustine
 

Owen Reich

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Re: Lava Rock and Pumice
« Reply #19 on: December 09, 2013, 08:20 PM »
Joshua, I'd need samples of the new stuff and where it came from.  Sounds interesting but could be industrial wastes or something.  You never know.  For example, Milorganite is a fertilizer made from a city's composted human waste. 

As for sourcing in TN, the cost of production, screening, and packing is the issue.  Easier to buy from a reliable source that has volcanic materials.

Thanks for all the responses. 
 

Joshua Hanzman

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Re:
« Reply #20 on: December 10, 2013, 11:43 AM »
Omg that is so disgusting, human waste huh? Like rock hard turds...

Yea, um I'll make sure you don't get human turds. I'll find out where it's sourced and get you a sample....

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Anthony

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Re: Lava Rock and Pumice
« Reply #21 on: December 10, 2013, 01:05 PM »
Joshua,

next time you kiss your girlfriend/wife, make sure her face powder is corn silk and not sterilised human manure-chuckle.
Good Day.
Anthony

* Owen, you have my sympathy. Importing can be the death of a fledgling business.
 

Joshua Hanzman

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Re:
« Reply #22 on: December 16, 2013, 08:45 PM »
Anthony thanks for the great mental image, maybe that's an issue on your side of the world, but my gf hardly ever wears any makeup, when she does put some on, she uses liquid foundation, she doesn't powder her nose like my grandmother used to in 1947...

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Brian Van Fleet

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Re: Lava Rock and Pumice
« Reply #23 on: April 25, 2014, 10:42 AM »
Owen, I should be able to help move at least a pallet of akadama.  Let me know a bit in advance so we can coordinate.