Author Topic: Repotting in Fall?  (Read 2795 times)

subnet_rx

  • Legit New User
  • *
  • Posts: 26
Repotting in Fall?
« on: September 07, 2009, 12:13 PM »
I just ran upon a $170 red maple that has been reduced to $40 because of a terrible spot way up on the trunk where I wouldn't care in the world of bonsai.  My plan is that I would like to repot this now so I don't have to water this huge pot all winter.  In zone 8, we can have 80 degree temps in December.  I had gotten some advice to put it in the ground, but I have this grow pot that I built that I've been itching to use and am pretty much limited on where I can plant in the ground until I get my backyard planned out and fence built.  What would your advice be?  Leave it in the pot till spring, then repot?  Or is repotting now ok on a big trunk chop with a good bit of root work?
 

noissee

  • Full Forum Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 101
Re: Repotting in Fall?
« Reply #1 on: September 08, 2009, 10:33 AM »
There is a good article at Evergreengardenworks.com about fall repotting. Read it yourself, but if I remember correctly, you can do a fall repot with just a little bit of root work: especially with maple. But you should save the major pruning of roots/trunk until spring. So, since it is not advisable to do that stuff in the fall, I would just wait till spring to do it all.
 

John Kirby

  • Hero Forum Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2216
  • Thanked: 16 times
  • I really need an opposable thumb...
Re: Repotting in Fall?
« Reply #2 on: September 08, 2009, 11:14 AM »
You can repot with drastic root pruning and cut down in fall, after the tree has gone dormant, without any problems- as long as you don't let the tree freeze solid (not likely in hattiesburg) and you protect the newly emerging shoots from freeze in the spring. Let it sit until it has completely changed color and is dropping leaves, then do the work. With your weather you will get significant root growth to support the new spring growth in march/april.

Good luck, we have done this with red maples (rubrum), palmatums (japanese), tridents (b...), hedge (campestre) and amur (ginnala) over the years. If you are going to do it, you may as well bare root it and get all of the bark based soil mix off of it so that it has a real chance to develop a reasonable root system.

John
 

noissee

  • Full Forum Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 101
Re: Repotting in Fall?
« Reply #3 on: September 08, 2009, 11:24 AM »
If you are going to do it, you may as well bare root it and get all of the bark based soil mix off of it so that it has a real chance to develop a reasonable root system.

John


I add chopped bark to my maple soil. Why is this not a good thing? What soil mix do you usually use for maples?
 

John Kirby

  • Hero Forum Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2216
  • Thanked: 16 times
  • I really need an opposable thumb...
Re: Repotting in Fall?
« Reply #4 on: September 08, 2009, 12:02 PM »
Well,
Long potential discussion, but I don't use any organic (nor oil dry, Napa oil absorbent, turface, kitty litter, etc.) in my growing medium, you can do what you like. I use Akadama, pumice and crushed volcanic skoria for everything (except Satsukis they get Kanuma and pumice).

What I was referring to is the fact that many/all commercial potting mixes will be 75-90% bark or peat. If you are moving the plant into a grow pot you will have a moisture sump (the decaying organic material around the roots) and the lighter mix you use forbonsau. even worse is when you get a field grown tree that has been balled, burlapped and then transfered with the mucky soil into a tub for resale.

John
 

greerhw

  • Jr. Forum Member
  • **
  • Posts: 57
  • Thanked: 1 times
Re: Repotting in Fall?
« Reply #5 on: September 08, 2009, 10:35 PM »
I agree with John, but a little charcoal will help also.

keep it green,
Harry