Author Topic: How to run a successful bonsai nursery in the USA???  (Read 8650 times)

Owen Reich

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Re: How to run a successful bonsai nursery in the USA???
« Reply #30 on: May 03, 2013, 11:07 PM »
Mike Rodgers has 3-4 in DeLand and I've seen others down there.  The issue with A. grandideri is that the leaves are not only compound, but the leaflets are long.  Good luck with that one.  Keeping Adansonia digitata in pots and not growing in-ground will keep the branches thinner and internodes a bit shorter.  I had one for 7 years (and by then the diameter of a baseball bat) 'til the heater failed in my propagation house and it turned into a puddle of goo  :'(.  They strongly dislike wet roots in winter no matter what the temperature you keep them at.  Also, be sure and cut tap-roots early on or you will be in for an unpleasant repotting experience later.
 

Artisans

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Re: How to run a successful bonsai nursery in the USA???
« Reply #31 on: May 03, 2013, 11:33 PM »
Great, I just ordered some seeds from Silver Hill. I also bought some Adansonia za (a whopping total of about 15.00 with shipping).

Thanks for the detailed info from someone thats close to me. Deland is an hour due east of my location. Again, thanks for your help Owen. I will keep track of the progress and comment here in time.
 

bonsaibp

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Re: How to run a successful bonsai nursery in the USA???
« Reply #32 on: July 19, 2013, 09:40 AM »
Best way to end up with a million dollars in the bonsai business? Start with $2,000,000.

Thanks for this I laughed my butt off!
 

augustine

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Re: How to run a successful bonsai nursery in the USA???
« Reply #33 on: July 22, 2013, 09:45 AM »
I've found nursery people that sell bonsai material the best folks with which to do business. I've been fortunate to deal with reputable people that folks on this forum would know.

You can contact them before, during and after the purchase and get answers and support. The price of the material compared to the work it took to produce is downright cheap.

You can't get this kind of support "after the sale" when buying appliances, electronics or cars.

To many who love bonsai it seems like a dream business but it takes downright hard backbreaking work. Many of these folks also travel to give seminars and since the workshop prices are usually very reasonable they can't be making a great deal of money on the road. Also, the work never stops, not on holidays, Saturdays, Sundays or during times of illness or family problems. Takes lots of dedication.


Best,

Augustine



 

Dale Cochoy

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Re: How to run a successful bonsai nursery in the USA???
« Reply #34 on: July 31, 2013, 02:11 PM »
I'm biting my tongue so hard on this topic that I think I taste blood! :-X
 

John Kirby

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Re: How to run a successful bonsai nursery in the USA???
« Reply #35 on: July 31, 2013, 09:48 PM »
Smile Dale, you have almost made it to the last step of the post nursery dispersal recovery........
 

Dale Cochoy

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Re: How to run a successful bonsai nursery in the USA???
« Reply #36 on: July 31, 2013, 10:57 PM »
Smile Dale, you have almost made it to the last step of the post nursery dispersal recovery........

It's the 34 years of wasted time/money that hurts! Not to mention a good tech, high paying job I gave up for it.
 

andy graham

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Re: How to run a successful bonsai nursery in the USA???
« Reply #37 on: August 01, 2013, 01:59 PM »
Dale,

But....did you enjoy those 34 years?

Andy
 

Dale Cochoy

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Re: How to run a successful bonsai nursery in the USA???
« Reply #38 on: August 01, 2013, 02:38 PM »
Dale,

But....did you enjoy those 34 years?

Andy

Andy, that question cannot be answered with a yes or no for something that spanned that amount of time, over 1/2 of my life. I loved it, I quit a great job for it, I studied 3 1/2 years with an accepted US master, I spent a ton of money, I traveled all over doing shows in the USA and out, etc, etc, etc. I accepted that there would be no retirement from it, but in return I thought there might be some interest in the trees I could style and pots I made.
What I've learned:
Don't start a business unless you have a high paying job with lots of unused income, or have a deep-pocket backer or an inheritance.
Pull weeds in Japan for a few months, that alone will put you on the circuit.
If you cannot find a promoter that is an accepted 'hero', or have one already, you won't get anywhere.

Being honest to customers,helpful to them, hard working and having talent will only take you so far.
It also helps if you live in an area where premier collected material abounds, or an area where stock can be propagated and grown at an extreme rate ( tropical).

Just my opinion from what I've seen .

D.