Author Topic: How do you make your muck?  (Read 3347 times)

Yenling83

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How do you make your muck?
« on: January 15, 2013, 10:12 AM »
What ingredients do you use to make muck?  thanks! 
 

geoffhobson

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Re: How do you make your muck?
« Reply #1 on: January 15, 2013, 06:22 PM »
Muck for what?
Geoff
 

John Kirby

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Re: How do you make your muck?
« Reply #2 on: January 15, 2013, 06:37 PM »
Yen,
Akadama dust, chopped up sphagnum and the yuckiest clay you can find. Make in to balls and voila- muck.
 

Yenling83

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Re: How do you make your muck?
« Reply #3 on: January 15, 2013, 07:32 PM »
So just any type of clay works?  I just used akadama dust and chopped Spagnum moss, but it did not quite seem to hold well enough.  Thanks John!     
 

John Kirby

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Re: How do you make your muck?
« Reply #4 on: January 15, 2013, 08:06 PM »
I think the Japanese package it up as Keto-tsuchi (see Fukubonsai's alternative):

FUKU-BONSAI'S "CORNSTARCH KETO-TSUCHI" MUCK

          In Japan,  "Keto-tsuchi" is collected from below rice fields that have been cultivated for many generations.  After repeated annual burning of the rice straw,  the soil has become very fine, filed with organic matter, and is very sticky.  It is used for rock plantings and as a temporary rim when planting on flat rocks.  Moss adheres well to the much.

           At Fuku-Bonsai we cannot use any dirt and developed the muck. Thickened cornstarch serves as a binder for a muck that can be mixed thick to build walls, or thin to serve as an adhesive. Because it has no dirt or clay it is usable in our "soil-free" certified export nursery.

          Myrtle had cooked three recipes of Fuku-Bonsai's "corn starch keto-tsuchi"  and Mike demonstrated how to mix it with roughly 1/3 cornstarch jell, 1/3 organic peat moss or spaghnum moss components, and 1/3 aggregate.  This produced a stiff mix that can be used to build up walls if necessary. By varying the amount of each component, it is possible to use the muck in various ways.

          Mike also introduced the use of aluminum foil as a "temporary vertical pot" to prevent roots from drying out, to encourage development of long roots, and as a major aid in creating rock plantings and exposed root designs.
 

Yenling83

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Re: How do you make your muck?
« Reply #5 on: January 16, 2013, 12:56 AM »
I think the Japanese package it up as Keto-tsuchi (see Fukubonsai's alternative):

FUKU-BONSAI'S "CORNSTARCH KETO-TSUCHI" MUCK

          In Japan,  "Keto-tsuchi" is collected from below rice fields that have been cultivated for many generations.  After repeated annual burning of the rice straw,  the soil has become very fine, filed with organic matter, and is very sticky.  It is used for rock plantings and as a temporary rim when planting on flat rocks.  Moss adheres well to the much.

           At Fuku-Bonsai we cannot use any dirt and developed the muck. Thickened cornstarch serves as a binder for a muck that can be mixed thick to build walls, or thin to serve as an adhesive. Because it has no dirt or clay it is usable in our "soil-free" certified export nursery.

          Myrtle had cooked three recipes of Fuku-Bonsai's "corn starch keto-tsuchi"  and Mike demonstrated how to mix it with roughly 1/3 cornstarch jell, 1/3 organic peat moss or spaghnum moss components, and 1/3 aggregate.  This produced a stiff mix that can be used to build up walls if necessary. By varying the amount of each component, it is possible to use the muck in various ways.

          Mike also introduced the use of aluminum foil as a "temporary vertical pot" to prevent roots from drying out, to encourage development of long roots, and as a major aid in creating rock plantings and exposed root designs.

awesome, I'll have to try.  Thanks John!!!
 

Chrisl

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Re: How do you make your muck?
« Reply #6 on: January 16, 2013, 10:50 AM »
So just any type of clay works?  I just used akadama dust and chopped Spagnum moss, but it did not quite seem to hold well enough.  Thanks John!     

I've use turface fines, chopped sphagnum moss and clay from Michaels.  Worked well.