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Author Topic: How do you create exposed root bonsai?  (Read 3782 times)
JRob
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« on: March 27, 2010, 07:41 PM »

Good Evening All,

As if I don't have enough projects started but I have been contemplating doing an exposed root satsuki for some time. Does anyone have any experience doing exposed root bonsai and could you walk me through the process that is used to create this unique style?

Thanks & Regards,
JRob
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cbobgo
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« Reply #1 on: March 27, 2010, 10:54 PM »

I have one of those exposed root satsukis, though I didn't make it myself.  From what I could see at the nursery, it looks like when he transplanted the tree he squeezed the roots together into a column of sorts and wrapped plastic wrap all the way around them.  This would force all the roots to grow down not out.  Then, I imagine he gradually exposed the top of the column as more roots grew out the bottom.

I bought a couple extra small ones that had not had that done to them yet, with the plan to try to do it myself.  But I had a hard time keeping azaleas alive where I was living at the time.  They croaked before I had a chance to work on them.

Now that I am living in a more temperate climate I should try again.

- bob
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MatsuBonsai
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« Reply #2 on: March 29, 2010, 08:25 AM »

I've done similar with JBP.  I'll see if I can remember to post a picture this evening.

Here's what I did:

Build your "frame".  For a smaller tree I used a 2-liter bottle, ends cut off top and bottom.  Plant the bottle into a 6" pot filled with bonsai soil.  Fill the bottle nearly to the top with large landscape pebbles.  At the top, add soil (and perhaps a little sand for cuttings).  Take a seedling (or seedling cutting, or cutting - particularly for azalea) and plant into the bottle.  As the roots grow they will wind their way through the pebbles and down into the pot.  Be sure to rotate often to get roots on all sides.

I thought I remembered seeing this documented in a magazine.  I'll try to remember to look for that tonight, too.  (I'm still recovering from the loooong drive and fun of the Bonsai Retreat!)
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J

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« Reply #3 on: March 29, 2010, 09:00 AM »

There's another method used in Japan, starting from cuttings or young rooted cuttings.

Make a deep narrow pocket with jute or a similar fabric, pour substrate in it and plant the cutting on top. Once it shows good signs of having developed roots, you can start cutting strips from the top of the pocket... gradually exposing more and more roots to light. That method is briefly explained in Kyosuke Gun's Mini Bonsai book on Satsuki.
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scottroxburgh
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« Reply #4 on: March 30, 2010, 12:05 AM »

JRob,

the method is explained at the following urls:

http://members.iinet.net.au/~arthurob/satsukisociety/SatsukiNewsletter32008.pdf

http://members.iinet.net.au/~arthurob/satsukisociety/SatsukiNewsletter12009.pdf

enjoy!

Scott
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JRob
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« Reply #5 on: March 30, 2010, 04:56 AM »

All,

Thanks so much for the info. Scott, I really appreciated the links. Extremely helpful and very informative. I will begin my project this weekend. I'll document the process and keep you all informed of the progress.

JRob
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