Author Topic: How about a juicy debate?  (Read 5456 times)

jtucker

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Re: How about a juicy debate?
« Reply #30 on: March 26, 2012, 11:15 PM »
SIFT FASTER!!!!! >:(
 

Owen Reich

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Re: How about a juicy debate?
« Reply #31 on: March 26, 2012, 11:30 PM »
Punishment usually comes in the form of reiterating what I did wrong about 20 times over the course of that day.  He knows how much I hate it  :D.  That and having to wire a really crappy trees for auctions and picking out every imperfection and again, repeating ad nauseum what I did wrong.  That is a powerful motivator! 
 

Sulaiman

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Re: How about a juicy debate?
« Reply #32 on: March 27, 2012, 09:32 AM »
Hi All

I am from South Africa where we have the most flora in the world to turn to bonsai but yet our bonsai are of an inferior quality. Meaning the normal bonsaist does not have good looking bonsai's. This excludes our Master's and few dedicated individuals.
1) I agree most don't push themselves to learn all the tricks of the trade.
2)As a guy doing bonsai's for 5 years I am only now only starting to crack the code. e.g How to water properly, correct soil, ramification and nebari.
3)At my club they say you must at least be 10 years into bonsai's  before you move onto intermediate level and I totally agree.
4)Bonsai's is an art that your learn only by practising and can only see by seasonally changes of your bonsai's

Yours Truly
Sulaiman Galant
 

John Kirby

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Re: How about a juicy debate?
« Reply #33 on: March 27, 2012, 10:41 AM »
Time and years in bonsai are a funny thing. I have had the good fortune of studying with Boon for the past 7 years. It has  taken me a number of years to discard the baggage that I brought in to the equation when I first started studying with him. Has been a slow process. Peter Tea started 3 months before me, he only had a couple of years of experience, and he rapidly learned and mastered techniques with no real fear of reversion, Peter still has less than 10 years of experience and I would rate him as excellent by US standards. If you ask Boon what is the most difficult thing to do in Bonsai, he will say "teaching a student who has been in bonsai for 30 years". Frequently, they have repeated year one 30 times and have not really progressed, yet armed with BT1 and BT2, they proceed. I fight reverting to my old ways all the time- especially when I have 100 of something to do.

John
 

Elliott

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Re: How about a juicy debate?
« Reply #34 on: March 27, 2012, 10:49 AM »
Off topic, but John you hit it on the nail exactly! Bad wiring habits and trying to make the best out of less than first rate raw material and many other bad habits are a real set back when you finaly get with a Japanese trained instructor.
 It's even Harder to teach an old dog new tricks when yoi have to unlearn your original bad tricks!
 

bigDave

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Re: How about a juicy debate?
« Reply #35 on: April 21, 2012, 01:26 AM »


So we have several different types of teachers in our club ...

Sounds like a great place.  Keep up the interesting posts J-tucker

I like this forum, you guys are awesome
 

akeppler

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Re: How about a juicy debate?
« Reply #36 on: April 21, 2012, 10:18 AM »
Time and years in bonsai are a funny thing. I have had the good fortune of studying with Boon for the past 7 years. It has  taken me a number of years to discard the baggage that I brought in to the equation when I first started studying with him. Has been a slow process. Peter Tea started 3 months before me, he only had a couple of years of experience, and he rapidly learned and mastered techniques with no real fear of reversion, Peter still has less than 10 years of experience and I would rate him as excellent by US standards. If you ask Boon what is the most difficult thing to do in Bonsai, he will say "teaching a student who has been in bonsai for 30 years". Frequently, they have repeated year one 30 times and have not really progressed, yet armed with BT1 and BT2, they proceed. I fight reverting to my old ways all the time- especially when I have 100 of something to do.

John

If you had to pick one thing you try to revert to, and Boon has taught you a better way, what would that one thing be?
 

John Kirby

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Re: How about a juicy debate?
« Reply #37 on: April 22, 2012, 06:19 PM »
Al, sorry missed this one. Pinching/Green shoot pruning. I have had the habit of constantly pinching junipers and certain types of deciduous trees- keeps em weak, makes them look purdy when they are full, but then there is no structure underneath. Allowing trees to grow out and then prune back to lignified tissue is an easy process to espouse, is often hard to stick with when things get going.