Author Topic: Hot in STL  (Read 2419 times)

JRob

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Hot in STL
« on: July 23, 2010, 08:24 AM »
Good Morning All,

Going to be a hot one in St. Louis today. Forecasting the hottest day of the year so far. Heat index should top out at 110 degrees. Actual temperature may go over 100. I was wondering what precautions you uses to protect your trees from excessive heat?

Thanks & Regards,
JRob
 

John Kirby

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Re: Hot in STL
« Reply #1 on: July 23, 2010, 09:05 AM »
Make sure they don't dry out, protect the pot from over heating (move to shade the hottest part of dsy, wrap pots in towels, leave on humidity trat or table.

Or, move to a cooler climate..........

John
 

JRob

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Re: Hot in STL
« Reply #2 on: July 23, 2010, 09:26 AM »
Jon,

Like the move idea. Always wanted to live in pacific northwest. However, not practical now. Maybe when I can retire! Thanks for the other advice though. I'll give them a try.

JRob
 

Don Blackmond

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Re: Hot in STL
« Reply #3 on: July 23, 2010, 09:37 AM »
placing damp spagnum moss on the soil surface helps tremendously.  I use drip/humidity trays with water or wet sand.  Placing the shohin/mame trees in larger pots or trays filled with wet sand or soil is a solid solution.  You can set the pot on top of the tray/soil or set the pot into a recess in the sand/soil.  Keeps them cooler and they don't dry as quickly.
 

John Kirby

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Re: Hot in STL
« Reply #4 on: July 23, 2010, 09:58 AM »
I use the damp spaghnum as well.
 

rockm

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Re: Hot in STL
« Reply #5 on: July 23, 2010, 11:03 AM »
Simply putting a wet white cloth (I use white bath towels and old white t-shirts) over the surface and sides of the pot can greatly reduce temperature and conserve moisture on extremely hot days. I put the coverings in place in early morning to preserve the cooler ambient nighttime temps.

Sphagnum moss on soil surface can also be helpful, although if you pack it too thickly and leave it too long (for weeks), you can wind up ground layering the tree...
 

Andrija Zokic

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Re: Hot in STL
« Reply #6 on: July 23, 2010, 05:45 PM »
 

Steven

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Re: Hot in STL
« Reply #7 on: July 23, 2010, 07:05 PM »
Aluminet is alumijunk. When I got my greenhouse I ordered some. It came with clips to fasten the netting on the inside of my greenhouse. Did not keep temps down at all. Course I have 2 6 foot by 20 foot pieces of 60% shade cloth over my greenhouse and my greenhouse can still get as high as 110 inside. That is even with 2 back wall vents and 8 roof vents wide open, one half of the front doors open and a fan blowing.
 

Andrija Zokic

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Re: Hot in STL
« Reply #8 on: July 24, 2010, 01:58 AM »
I use CoolNet mister in my greenhouse. I turn it manually, so I need a temperature sensor.
http://www.netafim.com/product/coolnet-
 

Dave Murphy

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Re: Hot in STL
« Reply #9 on: July 24, 2010, 02:40 PM »
Here, it was 87F with a dew point of 72......at 11PM.  Yuk!!


Dave