Author Topic: HB-101  (Read 6473 times)

meushi

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Re: HB-101
« Reply #15 on: August 06, 2009, 02:07 AM »
Osmocote is actually not that bad, one of the big French nurseries did a series of tests a couple of years ago and found that it was the fertilizer that gave the most mycorrhization in potted plants. They then promptly played down that result as it was not compatible with their ideological campaign against chemical fertilizers.

For French readers, I can link to a thread where one of their guys admits the result and their reason for not spreading the info more.
 

bretts

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Re: HB-101
« Reply #16 on: August 06, 2009, 08:43 AM »
Osmacote time release fert works great for me spread through the soil at repotting time. The idea is that the roots go looking for it. I don't tend to use it after that though.
 

rockm

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Re: HB-101
« Reply #17 on: August 06, 2009, 09:16 AM »
Osomocote is not a great fertilizer for bonsai, IMO.

It's been known to occasionally kill plants if applied incorrectly, or even correctly. The central issue is "dumping." The polymer shell on individual pellets is temperature and moisture activated--once the temperature rises above 65 degrees F or so, the fertilizer inside can get out when the plant is watered...That can be OK if the temp increase is gradual, but in the spring, when temps may spike suddenly, the bonsaiist waters heavily and the fertilizer is "dumped" in a large dose that may result in root burn--or even death of the plant it has been applied to. The problem is that there is no way to actually know how much fertilizer has been released. By hand mixing something like MiracleGrow or any other prepared powdered mix, the bonsaiist knows the dose and can control it.

Most of this is anecdotal, but this comes up repeatedly on many types of gardening forums. I've heard professional bonsai growers say they've lost thousands of dollars of stock plant because of it. They no longer use it in any form.

There is some evidence that a heavy fertilizing regime can inhibit mycorrhization. I've observed this to some extent in my bonsai.
 

King Kong

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Re: HB-101
« Reply #18 on: August 06, 2009, 09:47 AM »
First of all Osmocote is a brand name owned by Scotts. There are many coated prill fertilizers with timed release mechanisms due to different coating formulas. Some are better for your needs. The question is what are you trying to do with the fertilizer. Now if you dump coated prills on top of the soil and put the plant in 100 degree weather chances are there will be a problem. If you blend the proper amount of fertilizer with the soil like it was designed to be used, the products will do much better with far less chance of burning.

__gary

« Last Edit: August 06, 2009, 09:50 AM by King Kong »
 

rockm

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Re: HB-101
« Reply #19 on: August 06, 2009, 10:02 AM »
Well, yeah, but there's still more of a chance that any prill fert can burn your plants (although it's not really a huge chance), just because you have no real control over the "when" and "how much" is released. That's a function of the polymer coating, temperature and water.

That's too many unnecessary variables for me. I just dump a measured tablespoon of whatever's on sale into a bucket, add the prescribed amount of water and use when it's appropriate...
 

King Kong

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Re: HB-101
« Reply #20 on: August 06, 2009, 11:19 AM »
Some of the best growers in my area use half strength liquid fertilizers weekly for both foliar spray and root drench application.

__gary
« Last Edit: August 06, 2009, 11:21 AM by King Kong »