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Author Topic: Greenhouse Pictures  (Read 3294 times)
Chrisl
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« on: November 03, 2011, 10:59 AM »

After the suggestion from MatsuBonsai, I decided to buy a hoop greenhouse, and I finally finished getting it put up this afternoon.  Wow, what a project.  But well worth it, as I really like it, and I'm looking forward to a much more controlled environment  
It'll come down in the spring, and next time it'll go much faster.  Anyway, here are a few, one with my two best buddies Wink

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nathanbs
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« Reply #1 on: November 03, 2011, 01:19 PM »

off topic but do your 2 best buddies bother your trees. I have to have all of my trees at least 5 cinder blocks high because of my 2 best buddies. Nice hoop frame by the way. how hard was it? How much did it cost in materials?
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Chrisl
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« Reply #2 on: November 03, 2011, 01:42 PM »

I do have to keep the plants above snoot level as they both strangely like to eat the substrates with some organics; they don't eat the pure Turface stuff lol

With the plastic, hoop and delivery for a 6'x10' was about $450.  It took much longer than they said it would, but now that I have all the holes drilled out, know the layout, the next time it will be a lot easier.  But I'd say it took me by myself about 16 hrs or so total.  Plus 3 hrs with another helper to get the plastic up.  Making the door assembly took a lot of time...and again, it's made now, so next year...a breeze I'm thinking.
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Larry Gockley
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« Reply #3 on: November 03, 2011, 06:18 PM »

In Chicago, is there a plan for a heat source? Larry
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Chrisl
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« Reply #4 on: November 03, 2011, 06:49 PM »

Larry, I'm planning on a using a space heater, hooked up to thermostat, that I've yet to buy.  I just haven't had much time to shop for one yet alone, decide on a brand.   

The area is not that large, and I've got a nearby outdoor outlet for power.  Which reminds me I'll have to get the extension cord into the outlet, and cover with some heavy plastic as the outlet is only 1ft off the ground.  And lastly, I have one of those yellow heavy duty extension cords to use. 

And for the warmer days, I'm thinking of getting one of those stick-on zipper doors on the rear to open for ventilation...or I'll cut a flap in the plastic, and using the repair tape, enlarge the flap to overlie the seam.  And use stick-on velcro to seal it back up.  Though I might not have to do either if simply opening the door is enough ventilation in the end.  Suggestions? Advice? Wink

Chris

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Judy
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« Reply #5 on: November 04, 2011, 07:12 AM »

I would say that heat is likely to be your worst problem.  If you have it set up in an area that gets a lot of sunlight, then you may have problems with heat buildup.  Unless it's breezy and you are home to open that door, it could get warm enough to break the trees out of dormancy.  I would look at doing an automatic vent, and fan to help with that.  Course, maybe where you are it stays cold enough not to be a problem.  Here, even if it's cold, my greenhouse traps that sun's heat, and without the venting it gets hot quick.  I think I'd look into shade cloth if I were you, put your evergreens where they'll get more sun, and the others won't care anyway. We made our ghouse out of solex, which is translucent, this has been great to spread the sunlight, but not trap the heat.  And we put in a couple of glass windows for the pine area. Nice pals you have there.
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William N. Valavanis
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« Reply #6 on: November 04, 2011, 07:30 AM »

Your new "greenhouse" looks good, but I don't think that is what you are looking for. What you need is an "overwintering" house, completely different. Your greenhouse has been covered with clear poly to let in the sunlight. That is what you DON'T WANT! Greenhouses have been designed to let the light in so plants will grow. You want to simply keep your trees protected from the wind, a bit from the cold and more importantly THE SUN. You don't want the sun in winter. Yes, even the evergreens, you want DARK.

During the past 30 or so years nurserymen overwintering container grown plants have demanded "overwintering poly" which is white and opaque, which does not let in the sunlight. The sun will raise the temperature of your greenhouse and create the plants to break dormancy too early. NO, unzipping or making slits in the poly will not do. In fact, it may cause the poly to rip, especially in windy locations.

I've been overwintering bonsai with poly for nearly 50 years so have had some experience with this situation. I made the same error decades ago.

Now, I suggest you get some cheap paint, (discontinued colors are fine) and paint the poly on the outside. A light color is best, but some of my students tend to paint their poly to match their homes so it does not stand out too much. It's best to wait for a rain or two because the poly often has an oily film which repels paint. Just paint the poly, it will defect light and your trees will be much better off, especially in February and March when maples will want to leaf out earlier.

Next season, look for "overwintering poly" which is milky white and can be found at a nursery supply company.

Just a bit of unsolicited advice from someone who has been there and wishes someone advised him what not to do. Good luck, let us know in spring how you made out.

Bill
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Owen Reich
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« Reply #7 on: November 04, 2011, 09:11 AM »

Bill's advice is excellent.  I have only been overwintered with white poly for 5 years at a wholesale nursery but it works like a charm.  I've found it to be a little warmer inside than outside temps and definitely more humid.
even on cold days.  Since this thread in on the subject of a small greenhouse, another thing to consider with small houses with clear poly in general is to get a larger exhaust fan than you think you need.  Those hobby greenhouses need a high air exchange rate even  though they are small.  There was even a lawsuit a while back over the kits' fan size.  It has been 26 degrees C this week and we have Stewartia monadelpha trying to open their buds.  Scary.  We covered with bamboo mats during the day but still disconcerting. 
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Chrisl
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« Reply #8 on: November 04, 2011, 11:25 AM »

Thank You So Much Bill for telling me about the white poly.  In fact, when ordering, I told the salesman what I wanted to do with it and even asked about the white poly, only to be told that's not what I needed.   Aargh!!  So Thanks for tip to paint it Bill, Great Idea!!  Does the paint I pick have to be an outdoor paint or will an interior latex paint also work?  And Bill, I very much asked for, and appreciate the advice you've given me!  It's fantastic to have some advice who's been doing this for 30 yrs! Wink

Owen, and Bill too for that matter, you both think I need an exhaust fan even with the opaque painted film?  I have access to a Fantech, 6" exhaust fan I've used in the past to ventilate my prior garage when doing woodworking.  I can hang it from the center post and use flex ducting to vent outside.  But then I'd really need an environmental controller:  To turn the heater on when it dips below 32F, and to turn on the exhaust fan when it gets hotter than 36F (just guessing on these temps btw).  Thoughts?

Thanks guys for the suggestions!  I'm so glad I asked as I would've hated to have another bad winter outcome after last year!

Chris
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Judy
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« Reply #9 on: November 04, 2011, 11:40 AM »

I have a controller that does just that, i has a built in thermostat, and plugging sides for heat and cold, so it turns the heat side plug on when it gets below the setting, and fan on when it gets above a separate setting of high temp desired.  I'll get a name off it when I get home, it wasn't too expensive for what it does.  I also have elec. louvers set up on the opposite side of the fan attached to the exhaust fan side so it gets flow thru air.
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Judy
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« Reply #10 on: November 04, 2011, 01:31 PM »

So it's made by Green Air Products, (and bonus they're made in Oregon) it's called an Atmospheric controller model CT HT-2.  It's accurate enough for what I need, which is to keep it right around freezing, but never above 40.  This is a link to an image.

http://gthydroponics.com/green-air-products-atmospheric-controller-ctht2-pi-1001186.html?image=0

Looks like you can find it if you google the whole name.  I found it at a couple hydroponics places just now, but don't remember paying as much for it as they list it for, so you should just do a good search if you're interested.
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Chrisl
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« Reply #11 on: November 04, 2011, 05:53 PM »

Thanks Judy!  I love Green Air's products.  Very well made and works like a charm.  Thanks for the link!
But since this is a temporary winter shelter, I hate to pay more for vents, plus the cost to frame it in.  I may just get the GA product, and use my fantech fan; it moves a lot of air.

Still need to know though what kind of paint?  Interior? Exterior?  
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Jay
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« Reply #12 on: November 04, 2011, 06:18 PM »

Chris, regarding the paint. I don't think it matters if you are only looking for the one year. Exterior paint would probably give you longer life, while interior paint is not designed to take the elements, but you are just looking for one winter season. I know my grandkids painted their wooden swing set with interior paint, they used many different colors. The colors have faded but they are still there.

If and when you paint, remember to do it when it will not be raining for a couple of days. Paint dries to the touch in a couple of hours but takes much longer to truly harden. Also the temps are going to be too cold soon, you better get on it.

As for Bills explanation.....THANK YOU, it tells it all

Jay
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Chrisl
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« Reply #13 on: November 04, 2011, 06:53 PM »

Thanks Jay!  I really appreciate the advice on the kind of paint.  And yes, I'm only trying to get it thru one winter.  So I can use anything, great to hear.  So should I shoot for 100% light blockage?  I think Bill was saying this. 

And you're absolutely right Jay, I gotta hope on this as it is getting chilly here at night, and pretty windy too. 

Thanks Everyone for the help!  I would've hated to learn this in Jan. lol
Chris
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Judy
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« Reply #14 on: November 05, 2011, 01:45 PM »

Yes, even the evergreens, you want DARK.

I have been told that my JWP wants as much sun in winter as possible, and I assumed that my JBP would want that as well.  Not the case?  I've read that evergreens do want light in winter.... Is this another "myth"?
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