Author Topic: The big move  (Read 2811 times)

Larry Gockley

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The big move
« on: November 05, 2010, 12:10 PM »
Recently, we moved from South Padre Island to Lufkin Texas. It was quite an ordeal moving not only household things, but moving all my trees. It looks like three trees did not make it, but three out of a couple hundred is fair odds. I moved from what was probably a zone 11 micro climate, to zone 8. The new house came with a 14 x 28 foot greenhouse already built. I will keep my tropicals but will probably not  increase their numbers. I am excited about being able to grow new trees  that I couldn't grow down there, like maple, juniper, etc. I will be on this site often to learn what I can about more temporate climate trees. Thanks in advance. Larry
 

rockm

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Re: The big move
« Reply #1 on: November 05, 2010, 02:21 PM »
HA! Lufkin "temperate?" I guess everything's relative :D

Average winter daytime temps are in the high 50's low 60's, nighttime temps are in high 30's and low 40's, boderline temperate/subtropical...I wouldn't be too optimistic about Japanese maple bonsai there--My folks live up in Tyler in the Big Thicket where it's cooler ;D. My my mom tried a Japanese Maple bonsai once on a shaded porch--It limped along for a couple of years, but finally gave out from heat exhaustion. For the most part, Japanese maples and even North American maples (with the exception of red maple--which is a pain as bonsai) don't do well in areas where temperatures hover in the 80's or higher at night in the summer.

If you want excellent bonsai in that area, I'd look at local species--cedar elms, bald cypress, Texas persimmon, wild plum, willow oak, even live oak (upland form, not the coastal variety) all make EXCELLENT bonsai in those parts. All are readily available either through collection, or for cheap at local roadside nurseries or Wally World. I've collected cedar elm off my parents' land with great success. Bigger specimen trunks 3-8 " diameter are easy to get out alive. Same for BC and wild plum.
 

John Kirby

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Re: The big move
« Reply #2 on: November 05, 2010, 03:07 PM »
Japanese Maple are a tough haul, though Tridents can do quite well, as will JBP.  JOhn
 

Larry Gockley

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Re: The big move
« Reply #3 on: November 05, 2010, 05:40 PM »
Thanks for the reply guys. I do have several cedar elm from down there, and a JBP that I've managed to keep alive for about 5 years so far. I forgot about Texas persimmon, a good bet for sure. Thanks, Larry
 

majohnson

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Re: The big move
« Reply #4 on: November 06, 2010, 12:28 PM »
I am going to second John view on Tridents. Municipalities use them as a street side tree, so that is a testament to there toughness. It may need to be water a couple of times during the day. Placing it so it out of that late afternoon sun, will help as well. Other things that help maples grow in hot clements, would be use of shade cloth or wooden slats over head.

The other thing that should help against the heat is, working to reduce the leaf size. On a healthy tree you can defoliate it, forcing a second set of leaves that will be much smaller. So there is less moisture loss do to transpiration.   
« Last Edit: November 06, 2010, 12:49 PM by majohnson »
 

Larry Gockley

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Re: The big move
« Reply #5 on: November 07, 2010, 11:49 AM »
Thanks majohnson, for the reply. I will probably try some sort of maple if I come across any. A maple wannabee I'm also going to watch for is sweet gum. In south Texas, I was always looking for local candidates, and will here also. Thanks. Larry
 

rockm

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Re: The big move
« Reply #6 on: November 08, 2010, 02:14 PM »
Sweet gum usually makes bad bonsai...it's leggy, coarse and doesn't really ramify all that well. It's a tough tree, but can be a big finicky about when it is collected. Sweet gum is all over the place here in Va. and the fall color is spectacular, but almost every one I've dug out hasn't worked out real well for bonsai.

 

Don Dunn

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Re: The big move
« Reply #7 on: May 06, 2013, 01:11 AM »
I have a nephew that lives up near Tyler in Gilmer Texas. He is a good gardener already and is asking me more about Bonsai. I am wondering what types of trees in that area that make for a good yamadori candidate.
 

Markyscott

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Re: The big move
« Reply #8 on: May 06, 2013, 12:19 PM »
You should be able to grow Japanese maple in Lufkin. A number of us grow them in Houston in zone 9a. I have four including one I've had since I moved down from Seattle 15 years ago.   Use a well draining soil, keep it in the shade as soon as soon as daytime highs exceed 90 degrees, and forget about seeing fall colors (unless crinkled brown leaves count).

Scott
 

lackhand

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Re: The big move
« Reply #9 on: May 06, 2013, 05:41 PM »
I'm still in the early stages of growing the species, but so far I've had good luck in Phoenix with acer monspessulanum, commonly known as Montpellier or French maple. They're a Mediterranean species that seems to like the heat. Leaves are naturally fairly small, and they reduce fairly well too. Walter Pall has a nice one in his collection. The leaves look a bit like trident. Seems like it might do well down in Texas so I thought I would mention it.

There were a few Japanese maples at the last local show here (in zone 9b). I'm not sure what setup or care is being used to grow them though.
 

TimC

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Re: The big move
« Reply #10 on: May 06, 2013, 09:13 PM »
Tridents are always good, but here in Dallas I have ten JM's growing, container and bonsai!  All look good to me........but I am a rookie!  Growing doshojo, seriyu, Sharpes, Coorona, and Orangeola.