Author Topic: FYI - mycorrhizal fungi  (Read 2758 times)

Larry Gockley

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FYI - mycorrhizal fungi
« on: June 26, 2010, 10:29 AM »
The other day at a local nursery, I spotted  mycorrhizal fungi in a can.  Did not know one could obtain it other than in the wild. The company is Garden-Ville, ( www.garden-ville.com. ).  Knowing that the fungi was a living thing, I asked how that works with it closed up tight in a can, and the owner said it is the fungi spores that are activated with moisture. I was reminded of the movie Gremlin.  He also told me that the fungi are available in a liquid state, but the spore granules have a longer shelf life. Something good to know. Larry
 

MatsuBonsai

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Re: FYI - mycorrhizal fungi
« Reply #1 on: June 29, 2010, 09:41 AM »
It's been my understanding that there are hundreds, if not thousands of varieties of mycorrhizae out there, and the probability of getting the one (or possibly few) that are beneficial to your tree in a can is a crap shoot.  I find it much easier to just get trees healthy and keep them healthy.  The correct beneficial mycorrhiza will often find you.
 

rockm

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Re: FYI - mycorrhizal fungi
« Reply #2 on: June 29, 2010, 11:17 AM »
Rule of thumb on Myc, --if you wait, it will come. Buying canned myc is expensive and possibly useless, as pointed out.

If you can ignore the hype, the right kind will probably colonize your soil on its own...If you know someone who has had one of the species of tree you do and has had it for a while, ask them for a handful of soil from their tree's pot. Incorporate that soil into YOUR soil, Viola, FREE and EFFECTIVE myc...
 

Larry Gockley

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Re: FYI - mycorrhizal fungi
« Reply #3 on: June 29, 2010, 01:41 PM »
Thanks for the responce guys. I did google mycorrhizal fungi, and read there were many varieties. Can't say if the container I got has more than one variety or not, but it was made in San Antonio, so I'm thinking they would sell a variety more conducive to southern plants rather than plants grown in say Maine  or Seattle. Could be wrong about the variety, but the 12 oz. container was less than $12.00 so I am experimenting.  I put some of it in a damp paper towel, in a plastic bag to see if it grows. Thanks. Larry
 

bwaynef

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Re: FYI - mycorrhizal fungi
« Reply #4 on: June 29, 2010, 02:20 PM »
I like Plant-Tone's BioTone line.  Its an organic fertilizer w/ added mycorrhiza.  I'm not sure how effective it is at starting colonies of mycorrhiza in my pots, but I get warm and fuzzy when I apply it.  (Its also no more expensive than their other products ..and I have to apply fertilizer anyway.)
 

rockm

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Re: FYI - mycorrhizal fungi
« Reply #5 on: June 30, 2010, 07:55 AM »
"Can't say if the container I got has more than one variety or not, but it was made in San Antonio, so I'm thinking they would sell a variety more conducive to southern plants rather than plants grown in say Maine  or Seattle."

That's a pretty big assumption. The stuff may not be "made" there, might be shipped in from Spain, wherever. Who knows? THAT's the problem with a lot of this stuff. Myc is all the rage nowadays at nurseries. They've found it's a moneymaker, costs little to ship or make, but can be sold for $$$ for an ounce. No one questions them about the details.

You're paying a premium for something that's basically been given a mystical hocus pocus pass on reality. Simply waiting for the proper myc to establish itself, or getting it from a fellow bonsai person from a known source plant are much more effective (and infinitely less expensive) sources.

Before you apply it, you should know that intense fertilization programs and extremely porous soil can kill off myc or prevent its establishment...

 

Gary S

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Re: FYI - mycorrhizal fungi
« Reply #6 on: November 19, 2011, 02:18 PM »
I just bought some "Myconox" and I'm going to give it a try.

I have a bunch of Japanese White pine seedlings that upon inspection of the roots this fall showed no sign of mycorrhiza, even though I inoculated them when I transplanted them the second year.

On the otherhand my Mugho pine has some on it's roots. I bought it from a wholesale outlet that I know inoculates their stock.

I have an old Japanese hornbeam that has this certain kind of mushroom that comes up in the fall and speads it's spores.