Author Topic: Repotting Menagerie  (Read 5017 times)

Jay

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Re: Repotting Menagerie
« Reply #15 on: February 25, 2010, 10:49 AM »
Steve,
I have been in the "I need to learn and this tree with its faults is a good one to learn on" mode before. I've learned that if you don't bite the bullet and do the work (in this case an airlayer at the base) sooner it will bother you BIG TIME later.

I'm also trying to reduce my Project Trees to those with potential. I'm also trying to only obtain trees with a future.....

And I think I'm writing this more to remind me to do it than to post to your thread.....

Jay
 

rockm

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Re: Repotting Menagerie
« Reply #16 on: February 25, 2010, 11:04 AM »
Not to be a nag  ;D, but I also noticed you said you sealed the cuts on your American hornbeam after removing some roots. If you meant you sealed the cuts to the roots, you may have short-circuited the tree's ability to regrow new roots at those locations.

In my experience, American hornbeam (Carpinus Caroliniana) will push a masses of new roots at cut sites of old roots. Those cut sites can become the primary source of new roots. Sealing root cuts is unnecessary.
 

Steven

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Re: Repotting Menagerie
« Reply #17 on: February 25, 2010, 04:04 PM »
I got it now rockm, John, Jay. Thanks. The AHB where I cut BIG roots I do not want. There are plenty of roots above these roots AND where the old taproot cut was. The taproot cut was also cut at an angle so when the tree sat on that cut the whole tree leaned a good 45 degrees. I recut it level to where the tree stands upright or close to it. Also the old cut on the taproot did not have any roots growing from the cut site. 2 inches up from there it has roots but these are thick and very little fine roots on them. And the sealant probably is not completely covering the cut areas anyway since i used the "brown" goop. Not the green kiyonal goop or the gray or brown putty. The sealant was already smearing off before it was repotted.

Is there a reason why I should keep thick(1/2" or thicker) roots that will or could hinder the tree from ever fitting into a pot? Curious.
 

rockm

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Re: Repotting Menagerie
« Reply #18 on: February 26, 2010, 09:44 AM »
You missed the point.

When I collect American hornbeam, I sever the tap as far up as I can--hopefully  to the bottom of the trunk. The tree won't miss it. I also sever all roots six inches out from the trunk--even on large 6-8 inch trunks. I don't seal ANYTHING. Those cuts are the generators for a new root system that will grow in the spring summer. I only rely on a few smaller feeder roots to get the tree started initially--I do not rely on those older roots to become the foundation system for the tree.

I NEVER seal cut roots. You're setting yourself up for root death at the cut, as it will trap water underneath (even the Kiyonal paste) and become a sump of fungal and bacterial growth--soil is not a sterile environment...Sealant only need to cover the tiny outer ring of severed root to block new roots, as the tiny cambial space (less than 1/16" in most roots) is where new root tissues spring from.
 

Steven

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Re: Repotting Menagerie
« Reply #19 on: March 06, 2010, 07:50 PM »
 ;D >:( ;D >:( ;D >:( ;D >:( ;D >:( ;D >:( ;D >:( ;D >:( ;D >:( ;D >:( ;D >:( ;D >:( ;D >:( ;D >:( ;D >:(    ::)
 

rockm

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Re: Repotting Menagerie
« Reply #20 on: March 08, 2010, 08:51 AM »
I understand the frustration. Sometimes bonsai can be a bit contradictory and counter intuitive. Thing to remember is trees react to wounds very differently than animals. Sealing wounds is unnecessary, or even harmful above ground. Below ground, on an American hornbeam, it IS harmful, as this species produces prolific roots from cut root sites.

 

Steven

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Re: Repotting Menagerie
« Reply #21 on: March 08, 2010, 08:39 PM »
So bottom line is I killed it.
 

steve

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Re: Repotting Menagerie
« Reply #22 on: March 08, 2010, 09:23 PM »
Why not just wait and see? If you did then you learned something. No sense in burning now give it some time.
 

rockm

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Re: Repotting Menagerie
« Reply #23 on: March 09, 2010, 08:38 AM »
Steve,

It's far too early to tell if you killed it. It's not even officially spring yet.

Hornbeam and other trees that have had a lot of root work may not send out new growth until June. One elm I collected didn't send out new growth until the Forth of July--I noticed new buds on the trunk as I picked it up to heave it onto the burn pile...

From that I learned never throw out trees until at least early July.

Keep the root zone moist--not soggy--out of all day sun (morning sun is fine and may accelerate those new roots), but out of afternoon sun.

 

Steven

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Re: Repotting Menagerie
« Reply #24 on: April 28, 2010, 04:54 PM »
Sealing wounds is unnecessary, or even harmful above ground. Below ground, on an American hornbeam, it IS harmful, as this species produces prolific roots from cut root sites.





I think it is doing quite well. Here's an update
 

John Kirby

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Re: Repotting Menagerie
« Reply #25 on: April 28, 2010, 07:16 PM »
looks heaqlthy to me. h yeah, I seal the above ground cuts- guess I know too many japanese trained folks. John
 

Steven

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Re: Repotting Menagerie
« Reply #26 on: April 28, 2010, 07:36 PM »
I was quoting rockm's comment on sealing cuts below ground. As he thought it would be detrimental to my tree. above ground I do if it is necesary.
 

mcpesq817

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Re: Repotting Menagerie
« Reply #27 on: April 29, 2010, 10:36 AM »
I was quoting rockm's comment on sealing cuts below ground. As he thought it would be detrimental to my tree. above ground I do if it is necesary.

I don't think Rockm ever said that sealing cuts on roots will guarantee the death of your tree.  It's good to see that your tree is doing well, but even if it is doing well, I wouldn't discount advice given by people with a lot of experience working with the particular species in question.
 

Steven

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Re: Repotting Menagerie
« Reply #28 on: April 29, 2010, 08:41 PM »
No he did not say my tree would die but he did say in a way it could. As what I did, to him, was a no-no. I'm not discounting advice from someone who is alot more experienced than I but it is clear that he or anyone else didn't understand what and why I sealed those cut areas below. If I wanted roots to grow there I would not have sealed them. There were other roots I did not seal because....why?....I wanted roots to grow there.