Author Topic: Chopstick Method  (Read 2779 times)

shimsuki

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Chopstick Method
« on: July 22, 2009, 06:12 PM »
Just wondering if anybody else uses the chopstick method to repot.
I learned this a couple weeks ago by my teacher and am really impressed with the results.
 

bonsaikc

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Re: Chopstick Method
« Reply #1 on: July 22, 2009, 06:27 PM »
Shimsuki,
This is an excellent method for securing a tree with a fibrous root ball like azaleas, boxwoods, etc. It can help tidy up the root ball from having wires exposed to view, and can also help secure the tree. Other good methods using chopsticks are available as well including stretching one across a pad of roots and wiring each end down tightly among others.

Even dimensional lumber is helpful when tying collected trees into pots, to brace the tree where roots might not exist. Boon has a great name for this:

"Square roots method." I will show some photos of these very soon.

Chris
 

Jay Wilson

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Re: Chopstick Method
« Reply #2 on: July 22, 2009, 09:12 PM »
Shimsuki and Chris, I can tell you both know what you're talking about but I've been lost since 'chopstick method'

It sounds like a good method to have in your arsenal..
Could you expand on it some?

Thanks,

Jay
 

shimsuki

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Re: Chopstick Method
« Reply #3 on: July 22, 2009, 09:36 PM »
It is basically using a chopstick to secure your wire on than tying it over the roots and nebari. I am still learning but will post more in the spring, maybe even a video, of how its done.

Here are general directions. Set up the pot normally, and bring the wire up the edges of the pot. Put in a drainage layer and the tree and more soil, like you normally would. Leave an inch or so of soil left to go on the top. Shove 3 or 4, depending on size, chopsticks in the root ball. Wrap the wire tightly around the chopstick. Cut the top of the chopstick off and go around and twist the wire and the chopsticks with pliers. That is basically the rules, but I will clarify in spring. Like I said, I just learned it and the satsukis I repotted were not barerooted, so there might be a difference with barerooted trees.
 

akeppler

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Re: Chopstick Method
« Reply #4 on: July 22, 2009, 09:46 PM »
Definately a difference with bare root trees. Once the soil has been washed off the chopstick will not secure the tree very well. Useing the method Chris talked about with the chopstick across the roots and then securing the ends with wire works well.

Me, I just drill opposing holes thru the trunk and wire the trunk directly. I do this on trident maples because I cut the roots so short there is nothing to tie in.
 

Jay Wilson

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Re: Chopstick Method
« Reply #5 on: July 25, 2009, 11:07 AM »
Thanks for the info guys. Now I understand.

Me, I just drill opposing holes thru the trunk and wire the trunk directly. I do this on trident maples because I cut the roots so short there is nothing to tie in.

I've done that. ;D

Jay
 

bwaynef

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Re: Chopstick Method
« Reply #6 on: February 10, 2010, 01:32 PM »
Me, I just drill opposing holes thru the trunk and wire the trunk directly. I do this on trident maples because I cut the roots so short there is nothing to tie in.

By opposing holes, you mean you drill a hole, turn the trunk 90° and drill another hole?  I'd ask for a picture, but if what you're describing is what I'm thinking it's unnecessary and makes me wonder why i didn't think of that.