Author Topic: Late Winter, Early Spring Exhibit  (Read 1667 times)

MatsuBonsai

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Late Winter, Early Spring Exhibit
« on: December 22, 2010, 10:06 AM »
So, who is already busy preparing for an exhibit in 2011?  What are you planning on showing?
 

JRob

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Re: Late Winter, Early Spring Exhibit
« Reply #1 on: December 22, 2010, 12:27 PM »
Shim & I will be showing in Shohin STL. We are picking the trees this week and next while he is home from university. Pot selections are also being done and the display finalized. I'll let you know when we decide around New Years. In addition we will be showing in our club show at the Missouri Botanical Garden's Japanese Festival.

JRob
 

John Kirby

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Re: Late Winter, Early Spring Exhibit
« Reply #2 on: December 22, 2010, 12:36 PM »
I will have 3 trees or so in the BIB show in January.
 

M.B.

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Re: Late Winter, Early Spring Exhibit
« Reply #3 on: December 22, 2010, 07:59 PM »
Maybe I do this all wrong but I don't pick which tree/trees I'm taking to our show until the day or two before the event. Why? because I don't know which ones will be ready. It depends if it's in it's prime, past perfect bloom time, ect. It would be different if I had pines or junipers but none of mine are really ready to be put in a show (yet). I have a lot of deciduous especially blooming or fruiting trees and depending on the weather in spring, I could have a bunch of trees to choose from, or hardly any.
Mary B.
 

William N. Valavanis

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Re: Late Winter, Early Spring Exhibit
« Reply #4 on: December 23, 2010, 01:03 AM »
I personally feel a couple of years is necessary to select a bonsai for proper display.

After selecting the bonsai to exhibit, chose several, just in case something happens to your first selection. It must be cared for with "tender loving care". The bonsai must be pampered as to: watering, fertilizing, sun and air exposure, transplaning, trimming and general care. I feel it is important to respect the bonsai and prepare it properly for displaying, wether it's in your home, office, local bonsai show or your country's National Exhibition.

Then, a proper display table and accessories must be selected. This takes time and many friends as often one does not have a wide selection of appropriate display tables and accessories. Borrow one from a fellow bonsai hobbyist. As the display date comes closer so does the meticulous watch of the bonsai. It is cleaned, mossed and cleaned again with a "fine tooth comb" (tweezers, picks, toot brushes and small coconut brushes). The display tables must be also be cleaned, those with small holes are cleaned with a q-tips.

Remember the accessories must also be immaculate, wether it is a grass, suiseki, figurine, scroll, etc.

In June this year we hosted the 2nd U.S. National Bonsai Exhibition in Rochester, New York. Over 130 exhibitors displayed 226 of their finest bonsai which represented 27 states. Each bonsai, and accessory was immaculate and beautifully displayed. If the bonsai arrived dirty or not appropriate it was not allowed in the exhibition room. This year every bonsai was perfect. In 2008 when we hosted the 1st U.S. National Bonsai Exhibition, several bonsai were not allowed to be displayed (even though they were pre-judged and selected) because they were not prepared properly or dirty. Of course touch ups were allowed, outside the room because when you move a tree 3,000 miles often moss or some leaves move (and sometimes grow too).

Yes, this process does take time and considerable effort. The bonsai must be immaculate. Even in Japan I've seen bonsai not properly groomed for display. I was fortunate to watch the set up and judging for the Taikan Ten Bonsai Exhibition held in Kyoto last month. During the show I saw dirty pots, a few weeds, poor mossing and even a plastic cage to hold organic fertilizer on some of the bonsai! Remember, I have a very keen eye, and although I tend to enjoy the beauty of each presented bonsai some things upset my enjoyment. This exhibition, although the largest in Japan, is not strictly pre judged for entry like the Japanese National Bonsai Exhibition, Kokufu Bonsai Ten, now held annually in Tokyo in February.

The Commemorative Album of the 2nd U.S. National Bonsai Exhibition arrived a few days ago from the printer and it is excellent, both in the quality of the displayed bonsai and printing. The book is gorgeous, equal to those of the Japanese bonsai exhibitions.

Now is the time to begin preparing your finest bonsai for display in our country's 3rd U.S. National Bonsai Exhibition which will be held on June 9-10, 2012 in Rochester, New York.

Personally, I have been studying the art of bonsai display for over 45 years and am always on the lookout for appropriate and distinctive bonsai display tables. When my finances allow, I try to add one or two quality tables to my collection yearly. Some years none are added, others several. Storage can be a problem and I had bonsai display tables in my bonsai studio, attach office and home. When my home burned down last year we were fortunate and none of my bonsai display tables were ruined, although a few had to be refinished because of smoke damage. When redesigning my home and office I had a special area designed to store my bonsai display tables, photo attached. Even when completed, all my tables did not fit, and although you can't see them in the photo, many are nested together to conserve space. I told the finishers the heights of the shelves, then had to leave for an appointment. When I returned home I forgot to mention I had one tall shohin bonsai box display table and it did not fit on the top shelf. It was about two inches too tall. Soooo the finishers accommodated me by lowering one area of the top shelf, that's why you see the jog, and yes, it bothers me, but I must live with it. The shelves were then covered with a heavy felt for protecting the bonsai display tables. No, I don't dust them often as I don't have time, besides each table is very carefully cleaned before use.

Even with my wide selection of bonsai display tables, I often do not have the appropriate one and must borrow one from one of my friends, who also borrow my tables for our local bonsai shows. I feel it's important to share your love and passion with your friends.

Although you bonsai might look good outdoors sitting on your picnic table all year long, when you want to appreciate its beauty it is generally brought indoors so it can be respectfully shown, either alone or with accessories to create a story or scene. Although it is not absolutely necessary to prepare such a display, it's often done considering your audience.

So, please enjoy your bonsai, in your garden, local shows or your country's National Exhibition. Remember to respect your bonsai and like everything you do, you get out of something what you put in.

Bill
 

William N. Valavanis

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Re: Late Winter, Early Spring Exhibit
« Reply #5 on: December 23, 2010, 01:05 AM »
Two more photos which did not fit in previous post:

Honeysuckle on display in bonsai studio

Deshojo Japanese maple on display in bonsai studio
 

JRob

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Re: Late Winter, Early Spring Exhibit
« Reply #6 on: December 23, 2010, 08:49 AM »
Bill,

Thanks for such a thoughtful post and response to the question.

JRob