Author Topic: juniper  (Read 2049 times)

mds

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juniper
« on: August 10, 2013, 10:05 AM »
I bought this juniper about 1 year ago.  It was so thick you could not tell it had 3 trunks.  I opened it up this spring and I got little to no new growth.  Should I pull it from the pot and do some serious root pruning to it to stimulate new root growth?  Any input would be appreciated.
 

Sorce

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Re: juniper
« Reply #1 on: August 25, 2013, 03:01 AM »
Was it root pruned when it went to the pink pot?  Not supposed to be more than a third. If it is the same rootball from the black pot, I would pokey poke a chopstick in there to aerate the mass. Make sure its getting wet.

Depending on the condition of the soil and roots, IF it will die over winter, repot in healthy soil, if it was rootpruned into pinky and in good soil, you could wait years before removing more roots.

Aftercare, aftercare, aftercare!
 
 

Judy

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Re: juniper
« Reply #2 on: August 25, 2013, 07:30 AM »
Methinks that the pot in the first pic is the same pot, just shadowing from the tree makes it look black.... ;)
 

bwaynef

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Re: juniper
« Reply #3 on: August 25, 2013, 07:16 PM »
Just wanted to say, just because it *has* 3 trunks, doesn't mean your design has to include all 3 going forward.  They seem to be competing with each other.
 

october

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Re: juniper
« Reply #4 on: August 25, 2013, 08:25 PM »
Hello mds. This is incredibly difficult material. One piece of advice I can give you. Before you buy, always look at the trunk, no matter how hidden it is. Also, you will need to see the trunk to formulate which style the tree might be best for. To just buy a tree and not have some vision, even if a not concrete, can waste your money and time.

From what I see, the smaller trunk on the left might already be dead. So that one will need to go. The middle trunk is very straight and not appealing. I don't think much bending will be possible and if it was, it might not be worth it. Also, if that straight trunk had foliage on the bottom or middle, you might be able to do something. In my opinion, it would not be worth it to graft on that trunk. I think you best bet is the trunk on the right, it has some movement and some lean. Also, it has some foliage that looks like it might be workable. All in all, I think the left and middle trunk need to go.

Also, since the trunks are so far apart, this makes it even more difficult.  I would imagine you could use the middle trunk for some deadwood. However, the remaining trunk needs to be closer to the deadwood for the style to work.

Rob
 

mds

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Re: juniper
« Reply #5 on: September 10, 2013, 10:51 PM »
I am sorry I have not gotten back to you.  I have been busy with vacation and work.  The pink pot is the original pot.  It has been in this pot about 11 years.  My vision when I purchased was to give the effect of an African tree that had been limbed up by giraffes.  I know it is getting late in the year now for root pruning.  I just can't believe I didn't get hardly any backbudding.  And all 3 branches have good life on all of them.  Do you think it is too late in the year to lift it out of the pot and root prune about 2 inches all around and repot into the same pot?  Central Oregon Zone 5 is the area I live in. Thanks. 
 

augustine

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Re: juniper
« Reply #6 on: September 11, 2013, 09:19 AM »
Personally, I would wait til spring to prune the roots. This winter place it under cover so that you can control the amount of water it gets. It shouldn't be soaking wet all winter. "Under cover can be as simple as under your bench or a patio/picnic table.

I don't particularly care for the idea of an African tree on the savannah and giraffe image for a juniper but if it floats your boat, go for it. It is difficult material but you could maybe make something of it with help. Join a bonsai club.

Best,

Augustine
 

Neli

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Re: juniper
« Reply #7 on: October 02, 2013, 01:09 PM »
Maybe you can airlayer the left trunk higher, not to be a total waste of chopping it and try for another bonsai from it.
In japan junipers are repotted twice a year, with proper aftercare. Shohin august and spring and larger trees a month later. I dont know how cold your place is.
« Last Edit: October 02, 2013, 01:12 PM by Neli »
 

Leo in NE Illinois

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Re: juniper
« Reply #8 on: October 12, 2013, 06:20 PM »
MDS, you are in zone 5, which means winter can be quite cold compared to what most members here deal with. Up north here, we only repot the junipers in spring if we have the option. For emergencies, between 8/15 and 9/15 is early enough to get roots re-established and yet have time for roots to harden off for winter. So there are two windows of time for repotting, but here the spring is the preferred time, unless you can winter your tree where the temps stay above 27 F or above -3 C. With winter protection fall repotting is just as successful as spring.

African savanna style is interesting. And junipers are the "modeling clay" of trees. You could make that work. Most of us in USA are not familiar enough with the 'savanna style' to pull it off, because other than pictures in books, you won't see trees like this in the USA. But if you want to do it, go for it.

Junipers can be used for just about any style, any form, as they are relatively easy to shape. What seems to be the fashion, and goes with my personal taste is to use a naturalistic style, designing the juniper to look like a smaller version of a juniper you would see in the landscape in your area. This is my personal bias toward the styles I would choose. But junipers are very amenable to just about any shape you put on them.