Author Topic: Basic growing techniques  (Read 4958 times)

mcpesq817

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Re: Basic growing techniques
« Reply #15 on: August 28, 2009, 03:02 PM »
Hi Attila,

Do these portable greenhouses work well for overwintering non-tropicals, or do they get too hot?  

I've been using my garage to overwinter my trees, but lately I am thinking that it might be better to overwinter my conifers outside.  Unfortunately the way my yard is set up, it's not going to be easy for me to dig areas to winterize my trees (plus my soil is a very heavy red clay), so I'm wondering if something like this might be a good solution.
 

mcpesq817

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Re: Basic growing techniques
« Reply #16 on: August 28, 2009, 03:03 PM »
Hi Attila,

Do these portable greenhouses work well for overwintering non-tropicals, or do they get too hot?  

I've been using my garage to overwinter my trees, but lately I am thinking that it might be better to overwinter my conifers outside.  Unfortunately the way my yard is set up, it's not going to be easy for me to dig areas to winterize my trees (plus my soil is a very heavy red clay), so I'm wondering if something like this might be a good (and easy) solution.
« Last Edit: August 28, 2009, 03:47 PM by mcpesq817 »
 

Attila Soos

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Re: Basic growing techniques
« Reply #17 on: August 28, 2009, 03:39 PM »
Hi Attila,

Do these portable greenhouses work well for overwintering non-tropicals, or do they get too hot?  

I've been using my garage to overwinter my trees, but lately I am thinking that it might be better to overwinter my conifers outside.  Unfortunately the way my yard is set up, it's not going to be easy for me to dig areas to winterize my trees (plus my soil is a very heavy red clay), so I'm wondering if something like this might be a good solution.

I don't think they get too hot at all. Besides, they have four screened windows, so you can open one or two to equalize the temperatures, if you want. It may be a good solution for winter protection. I would place the bonsai inside the greenhouse, and then bury the pots in a large and shallow wooden box, filled with sawdust, or fine bark mulch.

I think that if you are seriously into this hobby, a small greenhouse is a must. I already recovered the cost of my greenhouse by saving 3 good trees this year from certain death, using the greenhouse.

It is important to place it on a good location: a place that is sunny until noon, then becomes shady in the afternoon. If you don't have such a location, this can be easily done by placing a large shade cloth in the right position, above the greenhouse.
« Last Edit: August 28, 2009, 03:46 PM by Attila Soos »
 

mcpesq817

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Re: Basic growing techniques
« Reply #18 on: August 28, 2009, 04:03 PM »
[I don't think they get too hot at all. Besides, they have four screened windows, so you can open one or two to equalize the temperatures, if you want. It may be a good solution for winter protection. I would place the bonsai inside the greenhouse, and then bury the pots in a large and shallow wooden box, filled with sawdust, or fine bark mulch.

I think that if you are seriously into this hobby, a small greenhouse is a must. I already recovered the cost of my greenhouse by saving 3 good trees this year from certain death, using the greenhouse.

It is important to place it on a good location: a place that is sunny until noon, then becomes shady in the afternoon. If you don't have such a location, this can be easily done by placing a large shade cloth in the right position, above the greenhouse.

Thanks very much for the reply.  To me, this seems to be an easier solution than digging a hole and putting up burlap of plastic sheeting to serve as a windbreak.  A little more expensive maybe, but probably a lot less hassle.  My wife might not be too happy if I start digging holes in the ground for my trees  ;D

I didn't think about sun when it comes to the location.  I have a pretty good spot that is sheltered from the south by a screened in porch and by the east from my house.  So, the location doesn't get direct sun until mid-day, when the sun has moved west (maybe around 3pm or so).  Something to think about.  

I am mostly thinking about putting JBPs, junipers and some other conifers I have outside - these portable greenhouses seem to offer more protection than just burying the pots and erecting some wind breaks.  Then again, I wouldn't be able to take advantage of rain and snows.  My deciduous trees I would likely just leave in the detached garage.