Author Topic: Backcountry Bonsai Blog -- Yamadori  (Read 32795 times)

leszekr

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Re: Backcountry Bonsai Blog -- Yamadori
« Reply #15 on: November 25, 2013, 10:34 PM »
Hi Sorce...your tree looks more like Poplar then Aspen to me. Triangular serrated leaves are telltale signs of Poplar. Aspens have rounder leaves somewhat similar to those of Linden (Lime Tree)...I am not an expert but this is what I think.
L.
 

Dan W.

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Re: Backcountry Bonsai Blog -- Yamadori
« Reply #16 on: November 26, 2013, 01:32 AM »
Sorce, I doesn't look like aspen to me either. I can't tell you for sure what it is though. Did you collect it?
 

Sorce

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Re: Backcountry Bonsai Blog -- Yamadori
« Reply #17 on: November 26, 2013, 07:20 AM »
Yes its collected. These things grow everywhere.

I appreciate its not an Aspen. I always wanted it to be one. That lead me to keep looking.

I believe it is a Cottonwood. 

Thank You.

Still looking for an Ase
 

Sorce

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Re: Backcountry Bonsai Blog -- Yamadori
« Reply #18 on: November 26, 2013, 07:24 AM »
Aspen, heard they don't reduce easily. ;D
 

leszekr

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Re: Backcountry Bonsai Blog -- Yamadori
« Reply #19 on: November 26, 2013, 11:21 PM »
Hi, I hope I am not hijacking this thread, I am still on the topic of collesting trees... I am trying to post a picture of the Aspen in the mountains, it kind of reduced quite nicely. I do not know about the pot culture, will find out in the Spring...
 

leszekr

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Re: Backcountry Bonsai Blog -- Yamadori
« Reply #20 on: November 26, 2013, 11:25 PM »
Wow... attaching the picture in my previous post worked so encouraged by this huge success of my computer skills I am posting another one, probably my favourite... Both of these Aspens are appr 24" to 30" high, trunks are about 4" dia at the soil line...
 

Sorce

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Re: Backcountry Bonsai Blog -- Yamadori
« Reply #21 on: November 27, 2013, 06:31 AM »
Very nice trees. Complete with fire damage?

Very, very interesting.
 

jlushious

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Re: Backcountry Bonsai Blog -- Yamadori
« Reply #22 on: November 27, 2013, 09:22 AM »
LOVE those. That's one great thing about the area around Calgary, the Aspen are sooo beautiful in the fall. Definitely makes me want to try and find one for myself. The contrast between the white bark and brilliant fall foliage is worth the effort.
 

leszekr

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Re: Backcountry Bonsai Blog -- Yamadori
« Reply #23 on: November 27, 2013, 11:09 PM »
Aspens can be a handful because they are host to many fungi. I am hoping that the trees I saw have mature bark starting at the soil line and up, not the fire damage or some canker. I found a picture of a mature Aspen in the grove and it appears to have mature bark starting from the ground and up that is very similar to the pattern I saw on those dwarfed fellows in the mountains. Hard to tell how old they are, for sure they don't have the most ideal growing conditions there so I am hoping maybe 20 to 30 years. Apparently Aspens live somewhere between 40 and 120 years so there is a chance that I may be able to enjoy one or two for a while if I'll be able to keep them alive...
 

leszekr

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Re: Backcountry Bonsai Blog -- Yamadori
« Reply #24 on: November 27, 2013, 11:12 PM »
Tried to post two pictures and failed miserably at that... here is another pic of the mature Aspen...
 

Sorce

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Re: Backcountry Bonsai Blog -- Yamadori
« Reply #25 on: December 06, 2013, 11:44 AM »
Hey Fellers,
   
The white, burnt, and the light yellow bottom.

Beautiful, almost perfect compliment to a fall Aspen. Especially yours here.

Though maybe small, worth looking at, there is a bigger one.


http://www.ikerbonsaipots.com/round-bonsai-pot-8-1-2-13586/

Thoughts?
 

Dan W.

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Re: Backcountry Bonsai Blog -- Yamadori
« Reply #26 on: December 10, 2013, 01:13 PM »
Cool aspens Leszeker! They look like they'll be fun to work with.

Nice pot too sorce. I'm leaning toward darker pots with mine, but we'll see.
 

Dan W.

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Re: Backcountry Bonsai Blog -- Yamadori
« Reply #27 on: December 10, 2013, 01:15 PM »
New stuff on the blog lately everyone. Stop by!  :)

There's even a "collected trees page now with some of our trees available!"

http://backcountrybonsai.wordpress.com/
 

leszekr

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Re: Backcountry Bonsai Blog -- Yamadori
« Reply #28 on: December 17, 2013, 08:35 PM »
Hi Dan, I looked on your site, nice material there... makes me wonder how far you had to walk to get all these trees, how many you had to pass over in order to get the collectible ones. I did some of my own scouting in the mountains and it made me appreciate efforts of people like yourself even more. It seems that I walked many VERTICAL miles and had my hopes up many times only to find very few potential candidates for collection, potential being a key word. For whatever reason the best ones are not collectible.  Also simple logistics like walking down 60 deg slope with 100 lbs of tree strapped to your back...and the truck is still parked a couple of miles away. And still no guarantee that the tree will live. Seriously now, I think that well established collected trees are worth every penny the vendors are asking. Getting permit, finding a tree, collecting it, keeping it alive and providing aftercare until somebody buys it is a lot of work and a lot of time invested... I truly believe you have to love this stuff to do it...
 

leszekr

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Re: Backcountry Bonsai Blog -- Yamadori
« Reply #29 on: December 31, 2013, 12:17 AM »
Since there seems to be no new activity in our thread I will try to revive it :) I took a picture of collecting grounds around my area and I am posting it to support the statement I made about how not exactly easy it is to collect the trees from wild...