Author Topic: Backcountry Bonsai Blog -- Yamadori  (Read 32240 times)

Dan W.

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Backcountry Bonsai Blog -- Yamadori
« on: January 10, 2013, 10:28 AM »
We just started this up, so there will be a lot of new stuff coming up over the next few months.. .especially when collecting/re-pottin season starts here in WY. Our focus will be on collecting Rocky Mountain yamadori... Stories of our trips, how-to's and tips, the art of bonsai, and tons of pictures! (even some trees for sale in the future )
 
Hope you enjoy! http://backcountrybonsai.wordpress.com/about/
 
Dan W.


(When we get to the point where we're ready to sell or trade I'll post in the marketplace or classifieds-- I hope this complies with site rules and regs?)
 

Yenling83

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Re: Backcountry Bonsai Blog -- Yamadori
« Reply #1 on: January 10, 2013, 11:38 AM »
Looks really cool man!  I look forward to following this, i'm going to link it on my blog if that's alright. 
 

Dan W.

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Re: Backcountry Bonsai Blog -- Yamadori
« Reply #2 on: January 10, 2013, 12:44 PM »
Thats cool with me  :)

Your blog is already linked on mine...hope thats cool too...lol
 

MatsuBonsai

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Re: Backcountry Bonsai Blog -- Yamadori
« Reply #3 on: January 10, 2013, 09:43 PM »
Yes!  We need more skilled collectors offering quality material in this country.   Please keep us updated.
 

thuan L.

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Re: Backcountry Bonsai Blog -- Yamadori
« Reply #4 on: January 11, 2013, 02:52 PM »
I agree! Keep up the great work! Your site is great!
 

Dan W.

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Re: Backcountry Bonsai Blog -- Yamadori
« Reply #5 on: June 08, 2013, 09:48 AM »
I have several new posts up; if you haven't visited in a while we'd be glad to have you stop by.  :)
 

Dan W.

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Re: Backcountry Bonsai Blog -- Yamadori
« Reply #6 on: November 21, 2013, 06:27 PM »
We have a couple new posts up lately. There is also a new "Yamadori Source's" page.

And... If you look at the end of the latest post there is a sneak peek at two of our trees coming up for sale! :)

www.backcountrybonsai.wordpress.com
 

leszekr

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Re: Backcountry Bonsai Blog -- Yamadori
« Reply #7 on: November 23, 2013, 01:10 AM »
Hi Dan, excellent blog, I am looking forward to getting some advice on collecting trees... Nice trees for sale as well. Is the big one a Limber Pine? I've heard they are hard to keep alive. What is your experience with them? Do you grow them in perlite?
Leszek
 

Dan W.

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Re: Backcountry Bonsai Blog -- Yamadori
« Reply #8 on: November 23, 2013, 08:29 AM »
Hi Leszek,

You are correct, it's a limber. We haven't had any problems with Limber pines here in WY. They are a high mountain pine, similar to a Japanese White Pine. People may be trying to keep them in too warm of climates... I'm not sure why else they would be having problems. -And these are growing in pumice.

Let me know if you have any more questions. :)
 

leszekr

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Re: Backcountry Bonsai Blog -- Yamadori
« Reply #9 on: November 23, 2013, 08:10 PM »
Hi Dan, of course I do... :). The first one is the time of the year you collect them. Second is the aftercare - mainly winter protection. As you can see by the hardiness zone I am close to the Arctic Circle so those Limber Pines will not have it too warm here for sure. I am wondering if you allow roots to freeze during the first winter after collection. If not then how you protect them I have means of keeping the tree just around the freezing mark in my shed with heater on thermostat or planting them in the ground at my cottage in zone 7a - some freezing but not too low. Do you also collect Lodgepoles? And lastly have you ever tried Aspens? I have seen some really interesting ones up in the Rockies, haven't seen any good ones as bonsai.
Thank  you,
 

Dan W.

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Re: Backcountry Bonsai Blog -- Yamadori
« Reply #10 on: November 23, 2013, 11:12 PM »
I'll try not to miss any of your questions...lol. But let me know if I do.

1) We collect the majority of our trees in spring, as the buds are swelling. This usually happens around April through May depending on how long our winter decides to hold on. Sometimes June can be good too if it's wet. -- We avoid the hottest and driest parts of the summer. - Then as it cools down again in late August into September we are able to collect some more. (But winter protection for our fall collected trees is a lot more important.) If you collect in spring, try to keep the roots from freezing again that spring. And in fall, I've heard is said that they need at least 6 weeks after transplanting before freezing.

2) Limber pines grow naturally all the way up in to Canada, so I'm sure you'd be fine with them. If our spring collected trees are happy and healthy we don't treat them any differently than our other trees. The pots/collection boxes are sunk into a bed of gravel with some mulch (usually pine needles) over the top of the soil. -- For the more delicate or late fall collections we usually put them in a cold frame where the temperature stays low, but generally around or just above freezing. -- Freezing roots is absolutely natural for these trees... what's most dangerous is abrupt temperature changes in the roots.. ie- freeze, thaw, freeze, thaw repeatedly. Sinking them into gravel with mulch helps to keep a more constant temperature with gradual fluctuations.

3) Planting collected pines in the ground won't do much for you, except cause you to have to re-collect the tree in a few years (with quite possibly a worse root system); A box that's too big will cause the same issue. -- The best bet is to build a box (we generally use cedar) that is just bigger than your root pad. Pure pumice is the best collection soil we've used so far. You can then sink the box into gravel for the winter as mentioned above.

4) I have collected a few lodgepole pines. They've been very finicky for me, but I think they will make nice bonsai. The West coast folks have been collecting lodgepole (P. Contorta contorta) and making very nice bonsai out of them. Our strain is p Contorta latifolia.

5) I have been playing with Aspens, but don't have much info for you at this point. I can tell you that they are easy to transplant if you get a section of the tap/mother? root with at least a few fine roots. I think they will air layer and make cuttings easily, but I don't have any experience with it yet. -- I've seen a few good ones displayed at the Denver CO. club shows.

Hope this helps, :)
Dan
 

leszekr

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Re: Backcountry Bonsai Blog -- Yamadori
« Reply #11 on: November 24, 2013, 06:31 PM »
Wow...thank you so much for the wealth of information on collecting and aftercare of these trees. As I don't have problem with collecting in general, I needed this detailed info on timinng of the aftercare in this particular climatic zone I live in. Glad you mentioned freeze-thaw cycles: these are my main enemy in the winter. We experience up to 90 (this is correst nine-zero) freeze-thaw cycles in the winter: from +5 C during the day to -5C at night day in, day out. And then Chinook winds come and warm up the air by up to 20 C in just a few hours. This is a killer weather for the unprotected trees, not only bonsai. The gravel bed is a blessing for me - I am happy to see that you are using it as well, this definitely legitimizes my instinct. I tried it last winter with a few trees and they came thrugh really well. Gravel acts as a buffer and does not react to the air temperature changes very fast as it has some thermal inertia in it. I will try Limber Pines in the Spring, definitely some of the Aspens. Thank you once again for the info, I will follow your blog to see what is new in your neck of woods...
Leszek
 

Sorce

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Re: Backcountry Bonsai Blog -- Yamadori
« Reply #12 on: November 24, 2013, 08:17 PM »
Hey Dan Les,

 Figured you fellers could confirm this as Aspen. Please take a look. It's all I can come up with, but still unsure.

Aspen?
 

Dan W.

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Re: Backcountry Bonsai Blog -- Yamadori
« Reply #13 on: November 25, 2013, 12:22 PM »
Hi Sorce,  did you mean to attach a picture? I don't see anything at the moment.
 

Sorce

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Re: Backcountry Bonsai Blog -- Yamadori
« Reply #14 on: November 25, 2013, 01:10 PM »
I attached them. Then typed. Typing now then......

Sorry not the greatest pictures.

Thank you.