Author Topic: For Owen Reich, defoliated gmelina  (Read 4636 times)

Anthony

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For Owen Reich, defoliated gmelina
« on: October 19, 2013, 02:06 PM »
Anyone please feel free to comment yay or nay.

Owen,

the leaves of this shrub got old, yellowed and started to fall, so it was defoliated. Normally once a year after repotting but this year is a little odd, little rain, and only just starting to fall.

As you know, the idea is to see how dense the branchlets can be.
Normally this shrub is leaf dense.

The root seems to be going for a tabletop effect and next year February, the extent of the expansion will be explored.

Something odd has been noted. This and a few of the other trees around 30 years of age, have thickened in the plastic bonsai pots they were kept in [ 14" long and 4" deep ]. So the Gmelina, the Tamarind, the Texas Ebony are all reaching 5" to 3"as trunk thickness goes.
No need for ground/trough growing.

It is already possible to get 8" in about 7 or so years in the ground for the Fukien tea trunks, and if it had not died, a 3" serissa trunk.
If we had full control of the J.B.Pine information we would have hit 3" trunks a long while ago.
I am leaving an image of one at 2" of trunk which grew to that size in the concrete pot it lives in. It was planted as a seed in 94 or 96.

The gmelina will be tidied tomorrow, so what you are seeing is just the result of defoliation.

Any thoughts would be appreciated, but no sweat if you have nothing to say.
Thank you.
Good Day
Anthony

They are front, with measurement, front, side, back
 

Anthony

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Re: For Owen Reich, defoliated gmelina
« Reply #1 on: October 19, 2013, 02:08 PM »
Other side, and J.B.pine
 

Owen Reich

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Re: For Owen Reich, defoliated gmelina
« Reply #2 on: October 19, 2013, 10:42 PM »
The Gmelina looks great to me.  As the largest one I've seen was 6 x 6' shrub, I have only seen photos of large ones.  From what I see here, some of the thicker branches on the front right could be shortened / removed.  This, pun intended, stems from wanting to show movement to the left.  You've got a strong Penjing influence to your work which along with other personal influences from living near the Equator.  I would keep it the way it is unless the notion of conveying motion to the left was more appealing. 
 

Owen Reich

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Re: For Owen Reich, defoliated gmelina
« Reply #3 on: October 19, 2013, 11:02 PM »
For the black pine, it's certainly dense.  Pines require a great deal of thinning and wiring to get results like those seen in Japanese shows.  Some in China are kept more puffy and full.  One thing that never flies is thick, straight branches.  I'm surprised it stays that dense in your climate without a Winter and with so much humidity. 

Since our discussions earlier this year, I've spoken with growers of the species (Meehan's Miniatures) and a number of collectors in Florida who have nice specimens.  Some defoliate multiple times a year and have good results with that for increased ramification.  Looks like what you are doing is working  ;D.  You may try not defoliating the branches inside the outer two inches of silhouette and see what happens.  Some plants need at least 75% of the foliage removed to shock them into re-leafing.  Not sure on this species yet but will know next year. 

Your Gmelina in the photo could be improved IMHO by drawing a line from the apex to the second fork on the furthest right branch of the tree.  Remove thick branches here and there just below this line to give it a more "closed in" feeling on the right side while allowing a little lee-way for branch angle variation to match the rest of the bonsai. 

The lower right side feels a little sparse so opening this side up via heavy branch removal could help it fill in.

I would also move the whole tree forward in the container a bit as it's sitting a little far back in the container. 


It would be great for you to share more of your more developed bonsai on here especially after they have been defoliated. 
 

Anthony

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Re: For Owen Reich, defoliated gmelina
« Reply #4 on: October 21, 2013, 01:05 PM »
Thank you very much Owen.

Your comments have been copied and I will show the tree around April next year, and see if it looks better.

Tree needs a new pot, any suggestions for shape ?

The J.B.Pine [ chuckle ] has just been extensively thinned.
Not to fuss, next month a test will be down to thin almost all of the branches to just 10 needles. Reactions are being observed.
We are slowly getting braver with work on these trees, still it will take about 5 more years, for any real change.

No straight branches ---- okay.

I am beginning to believe that either these pines will die young say 200 years or less or they go dormant by shortening of the daylight, for our cold is only 66 to 70 deg.F

As to showing more trees, I am not sure anyone here would have familiarity and thus any interest.
Many of the trees are local, and so local that they have never been used, or never shown by other South/Central and Caribbean growers.

Normally, we do not defoliate, as it is unnnatural to many of the trees, even during the dry season. The trees that go deciduous in the dry season, are often very coarse, as bonsai goes.
Still the Tamarind, and Flacourtia, and Malpighia g [ Barbados/West Indian cherry ] are without leaves for a month and then flower.
I shall see what is available, and try to show.
Thanks again.
Good Day
Anthony
 

bwaynef

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Re: For Owen Reich, defoliated gmelina
« Reply #5 on: October 21, 2013, 02:28 PM »
As to showing more trees, I am not sure anyone here would have familiarity and thus any interest.
Many of the trees are local, and so local that they have never been used, or never shown by other South/Central and Caribbean growers.

We may not have the experience with them, ...but what you've described above is certainly reason that most of us would be interested in seeing them.
 

Owen Reich

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Re: For Owen Reich, defoliated gmelina
« Reply #6 on: October 21, 2013, 08:41 PM »
Any photos would be great.  I'm going to post more too as I've been guilty of this.  It makes the forum better.
 

Anthony

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Re: For Owen Reich, defoliated gmelina
« Reply #7 on: October 22, 2013, 05:42 AM »
I left this on another site, to try and explain how our climate functions.
______________________________________________-

Our Climate in T and T

I came across this simplified information, thought I might post it so folk can understand that we have both a dry climate - low humidity and a wet climate with low humidity [ around 80% and under .] Lots of gentle breezes, and high winds at times.
 
So we can repot in January with a 1/3 organic or less [ compost ] to 2/3 inorganic or more soil mix.
 By the time the rain returns, the trees are mostly pot bound, and the water does no harm.
 It is not too wise to repot in the rainy season.
 
This year the rains came very late, end of July, and presently rainfall is still low.
 
On this island due to the winds, anything less than 6" of rain per month, will register as drought.
We are however lucky the clay soils can really hold water.
 
Remember our sun is also more intense than Florida/Texas and probably your deserts. Possibly closer in UV to your over 10,000 feet elevations.
 This why we grow so many trees -chuckle - for shade, especially on the seacoast-beach
 Good Day
Anthony
 

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