Author Topic: Heat, Ficus & Maple  (Read 1370 times)

JRob

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Heat, Ficus & Maple
« on: July 18, 2012, 08:02 PM »
Good Evening All,

Another day in St. Louis above 100 - my trees are dreaming of October. In the last 34 days 9 have been 95-99 degrees and 13 were 100 or above. My bonsai are doing well and do not appeared to have suffered even with the soaring temps.. As proof here are pics of a Ficus burtt davyi 'Nana" that was completely defoliated and restyled on June 9th just before the extreme heat set in and should be loving it. The other is a Japanese maple and I must be doing something right. Not even a scorched leaf. I hope to show several maples at the Japanese Festival at the Missouri Botanical Gardens in early September. Hope everyones trees are doing well.

Regards to all,

JRob
 

tmmason10

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Re: Heat, Ficus & Maple
« Reply #1 on: July 18, 2012, 09:57 PM »
Beautiful little trees, they both look really healthy.
 

Judy

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Re: Heat, Ficus & Maple
« Reply #2 on: August 10, 2012, 08:13 AM »
Are these still doing well in the extended heat-a-thon?  What do you think the secret is?  Mine were good till the derecho hit, and I think mine are suffering more from the wind than heat...
 

jtucker

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Re: Heat, Ficus & Maple
« Reply #3 on: August 11, 2012, 12:26 AM »
Here in So. Cal., some people defoliate deciduous trees in the middle of summer, when the spring leaves start (or if you're a slacker, started a month or two ago) to look ugly and burnt. I've heard about it on Japanese Maples, elms, ficus, and I just mostly defoliated a local-ish oak about a week ago with new beautiful leaves popping out all over the place and not burning, either.

The idea is that the spring leaves are not accustomed to the heat, even after they've hardened off. In addition to a size reduction, the leaves that come out during summer seem to be much more heat tolerant. Botanically, I'm not sure why that is, but I've seen pretty good results from defoliating a variety of species during the heat of the summer. I usually put trees in partial shade just after defoliation, but some folks around here say that certain species should be put right out in full sun. I can never remember which is supposed to have shade and who isn't, so I just give partial shade to everyone and it hasn't turned out too badly.

A caution as far as defoliation: if you haven't defoliated a tree before make sure you check with someone in your local area as to the timing and safety. It's way better to wait and ask than to permanently defoliate (aka kill) a tree!
 

Judy

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Re: Heat, Ficus & Maple
« Reply #4 on: August 11, 2012, 01:58 PM »
Thanks Jtucker, I mostly just partial defoliate my maples,  some not at all, as they're still in development. The problem is when the developing trees get burned leaves, are they photo-synthesizing fully?  I know that the tree has to spend energy to grow new leaves, but if they do a better job of feeding the tree... Hard to know what is the best course of action. 
And hornbeam are slow to come back out, and they can be the hardest hit for heat/wind burn.