Author Topic: A common adage analyzed  (Read 8841 times)

Anthony

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Re: A common adage analyzed
« Reply #15 on: October 25, 2012, 01:57 PM »
Owen,

my tree looks like an Acacia - blasphemy - ha ha ha. I will leave an image of a mature tree at the end of this response so you can see what I still have to figure out.

Hee hee as a hobbyist, one would be stuck with old ladies and old men wanting to be entertained alla workshop. I will try and make sure that does not happen to you.

A word of caution, apprentices in the Fine Art world, after the studio, are advised to go and clear their heads for 3 to 5 years. Very often they return to what they did before they went to train.
Not sure how that would work with Bonsai designs.
As the Sunset group says - Follow not in the master's footsteps, but the light that he follows.

So what would one of your trees from seed or cutting look like?

By the way, I am one of those who design so the tree looks natural, which is why I try to study many mature trees/shrubs of the type I am testing.
I am not impressed by the accidental or just poorly designed and therfore it must be natural.

My grandfather was from China, and he taught my Dad that if something is worth doing it should be done well.
My grandmother was from either Pakistan or Kashmir, and her advice was just make money.
My mum was from England and her advice was be true to your heart.
Fine Art at the level we study it is a business.

I have killed or lost many efforts, and tried to not collect anything I was not willing to really look after, so my graveyard is filled with ghosts of seeds / cuttings and a few collected saplings.

I enjoy your videos, and I like Lindsay Farr's work, I believe it is important for those in Bonsai to have some knowledge of how to make a pot and perhaps even make a few, same for soil sifting.

Time has no meaning to me and I try to pass on the idea to all, spares the trees a lot of torture, but then a good painting can also take years to complete.
Later.
Anthony..
 

Anthony

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Re: A common adage analyzed
« Reply #16 on: October 25, 2012, 02:00 PM »
Jay,

10 years is probably a more sensible figure or even 15 / 20 if it is pine type.

BUT Bonsai never stop changing and designs peak, then often fail and you have to re-evaluate.
Later.
Anthony
 

Owen Reich

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Re: A common adage analyzed
« Reply #17 on: October 25, 2012, 11:47 PM »
I'm going to start a different thread about bonsai from propagated material. 

I was referring to the compound foliage looking like an Acacia, not the form  :).

 

Chrisl

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Re: A common adage analyzed
« Reply #18 on: October 26, 2012, 11:31 AM »
Interesting topic guys!  I too came in from a science based background and had always wished I was more 'artistic'.  So this journey into bonsai has been relatively easy when it come to horticulture, both the science, and from 20+ yrs of growing, potting household plants.  So repotting was never a big problem when first starting off.  It was, and still is, a lack of artistic creativity, that is my biggest stumbling block to bonsai now.  Though in the short time I've been seriously trying in this hobby, I've gotten a bit better.  But I have a long way to go, and in the end, I'm going to find the best teacher at hands to help with the 'art' of bonsai.  Just my .02 cents ;)
 

Anthony

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Re: A common adage analyzed
« Reply #19 on: October 26, 2012, 12:31 PM »
Chrisl,

as far as I know that type of design/pattern information has never been written down in a book, is usually transfered by word of mouth.

However, have you tried this -

https://www.google.tt/search?q=tree+silhouette&hl=en&safe=off&qscrl=1&rlz=1T4TSHB_en___TT342&prmd=imvns&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=lriKUN3_G7KQ0QGzqoG4BA&sqi=2&ved=0CB8QsAQ&biw=1093&bih=483

This is the mass of the tree when seen from a distance. If you can form an attractive and interesting shape you can hold the eye.

Look also at the negative space - the space for the birds to fly through - can you create attractive shapes that harmonise with each other and ultimately the whole [ of the tree .]

As it goes, it must first engage the eye and then the mind, and hopefully contemplation will follow [ with Bonsai perhaps - memory.]

Then try this -

https://www.google.tt/search?q=tree+silhouette&hl=en&safe=off&qscrl=1&rlz=1T4TSHB_en___TT342&prmd=imvns&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=lriKUN3_G7KQ0QGzqoG4BA&sqi=2&ved=0CB8QsAQ&biw=1093&bih=483#hl=en&safe=off&qscrl=1&rlz=1T4TSHB_en___TT342&tbm=isch&sa=1&q=tree+outline+pictures&oq=tree+outline+&gs_l=img.1.0.0l10.262508.267818.0.270618.18.15.0.3.3.1.226.1682.5j7j1.13.0...0.0...1c.1.pbhoJZXj598&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.r_qf.&fp=d8bd166e9ee6755b&bpcl=35466521&biw=1093&bih=483

Outline - the bones of your tree , the first 6 branches and then the branchlets added on.

Apologies is I am speaking Fine Art jargon and I have lost you. Feel free to ask.
Later.
Anthony