Author Topic: 4 sorce  (Read 1870 times)

Judy

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4 sorce
« on: January 07, 2014, 02:31 PM »
Sorce, I'll try to answer your questions  as succinctly as possible, but keep in mind  that no two persons experiences will lead to the same place.

Another excellent specimen. It prompts me to wonder so many things about how you have gotten to this point. This point of having so many trees that seem to speak directly to me, exactly how they should.

I am almost totally self-taught at this game.  I am a very driven personality, and when I decided to get into this fully, I did a lot of homework, studied many books before I jumped in with both feet.  I think if you are determined, that will take you very far.  But you have to learn how to quiet yourself and study the tree before you decide where it should go. Sometimes for a year or more.  I think too much these days is instant, and I don't do that.
Find the trees best asset and work with it.

I would also say that you have to be lucky enough to find the right material that suits your design aesthetic.  I have been blessed to find great vendors of stock along the way, from rough pre-bonsai, to more developed material that I've been able to take my own direction. 

As far as the fact that my trees speak to you, good, I'm glad.  But there are many other people that have far better trees than I, you need to go seek these out to look at them.  I just happen to like sharing my trees in this and another forum, so you happen to see them. 

Go to collections as you can or exhibitions, they will help you to develop your eye.  That is another piece of the puzzle that takes time.  You must quiet yourself, and really LOOK at the tree and learn from each one.  And keep that information in your head filed away.  It really is just a study like any other.  Artistically I just use the knowledge I've retained, use the best part of the tree, and the rest just comes naturally.  But I've loved and looked at trees for all my life.

If you could please elaborate on these events that seem to have created a person so pivotal in solving a lot of these artist-owner, American Bonsai progression, bad advice-good advice arguments that we have in some other threads.

Hm, I don't think I'm very pivotal, you should think about expanding your horizons bonsai wise.  I will say that I've got my ideas about these things, and I do state them... without arguing about them.  Peoples views are .... their views. 

I think that for the majority of new hobbyists, clubs can be the road to better bonsai, if the right club is available.  I only joined a club last year.  Honestly - I have not gleaned that much from it, aside from meeting Owen, and being able to have him work with me for a day on my trees.  That is an experience that I think was well worth it, and I would suggest this to anyone who wants to move their work forward.  I think these types of things will only serve to move the whole of the hobby forward. 

I think that the fact that I've only really ever seen good trees for the most part (books and collections) helped me to only strive for great material.  I was surprised when I went to the local club exhibition, and a couple meetings that there was a large contingent of less than average material shown to be honest.  By then my eye had already formed, so I didn't see this as "good" material.  We need to work on training newer eyes to finer trees.

Basically, your trees speak so loud. I think everyone would benefit from knowing how you discipline yourself to not be one who has to impart their ego in a tree.....

Perhaps because I do this in a vacuum. For me, it's all about the tree, not about anything else.  Other than on forums, only a handful of people have seen my trees.  And a small percentage of those people know what they are looking at.  So there's not much ego to be had out here...
I'm glad my trees have a voice....
Thank you for your kind thoughts. 

 

Sorce

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Re: 4 sorce
« Reply #1 on: January 07, 2014, 04:40 PM »
Thank you!

   It's funny you used vacuum as a positive. The thread I read earlier was against a vacuum. As in, letting others have opinions. It does work both ways.

Your experience is pivotal in turning Bonsai into an actual industry here in America. Away from "instant" and into the silence that speaks so loud! Utilizing professionals, not buying mallsai.

Again, it is your trees that speak these things, folks just need interpretation to human English and I thank you again for doing so.

Same goes for all the folks here with fabulous trees. It's just those Great Lakes-Midwest trees of yours that.....well, I want to climb them!

Thanks again!


 
 

bwaynef

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Re: 4 sorce
« Reply #2 on: January 08, 2014, 10:57 AM »
I think that the fact that I've only really ever seen good trees for the most part (books and collections) helped me to only strive for great material.  I was surprised when I went to the local club exhibition, and a couple meetings that there was a large contingent of less than average material shown to be honest.  By then my eye had already formed, so I didn't see this as "good" material.  We need to work on training newer eyes to finer trees.

^THIS!
 

Sorce

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Re: 4 sorce
« Reply #3 on: January 08, 2014, 02:26 PM »
I agree. From videos of course.

More order of display seems to be needed at least, to make the most of what is displayed, as I guess we do have younger trees.

 

John Kirby

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Re: 4 sorce
« Reply #4 on: January 08, 2014, 05:25 PM »
Judy,
Nice approach. Clubs can be fun, my only issue is that you have to sort through the information you get, and the personalities involved. I once asked a professional about what was the toughest part of doing Bonsai in the US. I thought it might be the relative paucity of good material in clubs or the immaturity of trees or the lack of willingness of people to actually work on their trees. They said that for them it was working with people who had twenty or thirty years of bonsai experience, yet didn't realize that they had just repeated the first year over, and over, and over, again. You have to pick your real bonsai friends carefully, I try to sort mine in to those that I like because they are good, thoughtful and/fun people and those (who may have those attributes) who I want to work around/with. I like them pretty much the same, we just do different activities together.

Good for you working with Owen, there is something very powerful about working with someone who's life and training revolve around what most of us consider a hobby. The little, important hints, suggestions and activities frequently lead to the greatest improvements in our trees. I have sold trees for a long time, we propagate a lot, I am fortunate to get to spend a good deal of time over the year with really good professionals, it is amazing how much I learn on each occasion.

 

Judy

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Re: 4 sorce
« Reply #5 on: January 08, 2014, 09:38 PM »
Well, it's not an approach that may work for everyone, but it was the only way for me with my schedule. It allowed me to find my own aesthetic, and learn on my own terms, at my own speed.   I do have an extensive horticultural background with large market size gardens and huge landscaping projects and literally 100's of trees planted from whips and b&bs.  So I wasn't starting exactly from scratch.
I do not want to sound like a know it all, I only know what has worked for me. 
I find that I do not like working with poor material, or around it.  So that for me is probably a detrimental thing for the club scene.  I only wish I had more like minded individuals to connect with sometimes. It does help to bounce ideas, and keep your mind open to learning new approaches and techniques.
Thanks for the thoughts John.
 

Brian Van Fleet

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Re: 4 sorce
« Reply #6 on: January 08, 2014, 10:31 PM »
Good read Judy, thanks for a peek under the tent!  I appreciate seeing your work, and the continual growth.