Author Topic: Toyo Nishiki Japanese Flowering Quince  (Read 9685 times)

Jay

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Re: Toyo Nishiki Japanese Flowering Quince
« Reply #15 on: January 16, 2011, 07:36 AM »
Jerry, I really like that garden Quince, I know mine will be twigs compared to it. Hopefully they will give a good show.

I checked on the shipping of mine and was told they will probably ship late Feb to early March. Probably a good thing with northern Vermont getting some colder weather now. We are not getting the classic minus 20's we usually see in January but still cold enough to not want bare root plants to sit in transit.

Jay
 

Jay

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Re: Toyo Nishiki Japanese Flowering Quince
« Reply #16 on: January 16, 2011, 01:44 PM »
OK, it is a cold dark day here in northern Vermont. I've been out doing a little snow shoeing but at the moment I fall into the group of ' having too much time on my hands'. I've been thinking of what I've read about Quince, them being slow to thicken. As purely a  hypothetical question, what if when my two Quince arrive I look to plant them together. Giving the now one tree a thicker look. I know this works with some trees, not sure if it would with Quince. Again this is Hypothetical being I have no idea if the two trees will 'work' together. Possibly mother daughter style, twin trunk etc.....

Let me know you thoughts, do you feel they will over time grow together?


Jay
 

Jay

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Re: Toyo Nishiki Japanese Flowering Quince
« Reply #17 on: January 17, 2011, 04:26 PM »
Update- Received an email from Bill. He said he has packed my trees and will ship them tomorrow, they should arrive by the end of the week. I'll be posting pictures shortly.

Jay
 

Jay

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Re: Toyo Nishiki Japanese Flowering Quince
« Reply #18 on: January 21, 2011, 11:32 AM »
The trees arrived Thursday. I am very pleased with them. Excellent value and nice possibilities. They are both approx 1 1/2 inches at the nebari and have main branches of approx 1/2 inch. They are both presently 18 inches tall more or less.
 

Jay

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Re: Toyo Nishiki Japanese Flowering Quince
« Reply #19 on: January 21, 2011, 11:37 AM »
As you can see they have green ribbons on various branches. These were placed there by Bill as his thoughts for the tree. I await the groups thoughts and will try and post other pictures that are either requested by the group or show the trees after they have been potted. They will probable be potted this Sunday. Note- thethird picture of this group shows the buds on one of the trees.

Enjoy
Jay
 

William N. Valavanis

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Re: Toyo Nishiki Japanese Flowering Quince
« Reply #20 on: January 21, 2011, 01:08 PM »
Jay,

Here are a couple of photos of one of my Toyo Nishiki Japanese Flowering Quince.
Good luck with your new plants, and have fun while training them.

Bill
 

mcpesq817

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Re: Toyo Nishiki Japanese Flowering Quince
« Reply #21 on: January 21, 2011, 02:08 PM »
Hi Jay, nice acquisition.  Quince take pretty easily as cuttings, so before you do too much pruning, you might want to try cuttings.  Also, remember that it is recommended that quince be repotted in the fall, so I would probably refrain from doing any root work at this time.

Very nice quince Bill - just out of curiosity, are the red flowers from a grafted branch, or does your quince naturally have the white, pink and red flowers?
 

Jay

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Re: Toyo Nishiki Japanese Flowering Quince
« Reply #22 on: January 21, 2011, 02:27 PM »
mcpesq817, thanks for the kind words. I will be doing the pruning with an eye to these two trees future. That said I will be trying to start some cuttings from what is going to be removed. My first thought was to bring these two trees to my study group meeting and discuss them. Bill's suggestions are looking pretty good and with his eye I may just go in that direction. However, looking at the temperatures for this weekend especially Sunday, I think I may decide to do these at home and not have them out in neg 10 to 20 F temps.

Either way, I will be posting pictures as i go. As for the three colors of flowers, that is one of the possibilities with Toyo Nishiki. I can not speak for Bills' but they do occur naturally as I understand it. I will post the colors that open from my buds.

Jay
 

William N. Valavanis

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Re: Toyo Nishiki Japanese Flowering Quince
« Reply #23 on: January 21, 2011, 03:44 PM »
Glad you like my Toyo Nishiki Japanese Flowering Quince bonsai. Over 30 years ago a young plant was obtained in Japan and I trained the plant into the present design. A couple of years ago the tree suddenly began to thicken up. When it did I looked carefully and the single red branch was grafted on! The graft was not apparent for over 25 years, but now, if one carefully looks from the right angle, there it is! One has to look very carefully to see it.

Also, by the way, I've been growing and training Japanese Flowering Quince for over 45 years here in America. I always transplant them in spring, NOT in autumn. In Japan, someone discovered (for them) that Japanese Flowering Quince are often transplanted in autumn when certain pests are not too active. I've never seen it here in America, and actually I don't know anyone who transplants Japanese Flowering Quince bonsai in autumn. It's cold here in upstate New York and I doubt, except with extreme measures, that this species would survive if transplanted in autumn. In spring, one can be very drastic with the roots and the plants just keep on growing.

Now, I've been doing this a long time and can tell you that you can almost do anything, anytime during the year if the correct techniques, aftercare and environment is provided. You can transplant nearly anything, anytime IF you know what you are doing.

My recommendation is to transplant Japanese Flowering Quince in spring AS the new buds are opening. Of course, you can do this a bit earlier or a bit later with good results too.

Bill
 

John Kirby

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Re: Toyo Nishiki Japanese Flowering Quince
« Reply #24 on: January 21, 2011, 10:47 PM »
Bill, thanks for the comments. I have found that fall repotting is the mst relable, in my climate (former) in Arkansas where this species and chinese quince only rarely go completely dormant. I have only repotted a few hundred over the years, we never have had a lot of them, but have ad siginificantly better success in te falk than in te spring, close to 100% survival in the fall and less than 50% in the spring, but as you have pointed out, that is in our moderate climate with trees under platic.

Love your quince bonsai, the grafted branch is truly cool!

John
 

mcpesq817

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Re: Toyo Nishiki Japanese Flowering Quince
« Reply #25 on: January 22, 2011, 12:54 PM »
Hi Bill, thanks for the comments.  On the red flower branch being grafted, I asked because Brent Walston sells red toyo nishikis for grafting onto the pink/white plants.  I know that on the two toyo nishikis that I have that they have only flowered pink and white.  The tri-color plants, regardless of whether they are grafted or not, are really cool.

On the fall repotting, like John, I've had 100% success repotting in fall, but less success in the spring.  It could be a result of our moderate climate down here in the DC area, similar to John's experience.

Thanks again for sharing!  Flowering quince are a lot of fun, especially during the drab winter months.   ;D
 

Steven

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Re: Toyo Nishiki Japanese Flowering Quince
« Reply #26 on: January 23, 2011, 08:11 AM »
OK, you all are making my mouth water for 2 or 3 of them  ;D    But being a poor boy at the moment all I can do is dream LOL. Looking forward to their progress and updates.
 

Jay

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Re: Toyo Nishiki Japanese Flowering Quince
« Reply #27 on: January 23, 2011, 08:40 AM »
Steven,
I don't know if Bill has any left, but they were EXTREMELY reasonable in price. You can go to http://www.internationalbonsai.com/page/1442817
and download his catalog. In addition, the trees are priced postage included.

In addition go to Brents site and check out the possibilities. I'm sure there are other places to shop on line, these are the two I prefer.

Picture of the potting/trimming coming mid-week.

Jay
 

Steven

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Re: Toyo Nishiki Japanese Flowering Quince
« Reply #28 on: January 23, 2011, 12:52 PM »
Thanks Jay. Will keep it in mind once I have money coming in.
 

Jay

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Re: Toyo Nishiki Japanese Flowering Quince
« Reply #29 on: January 26, 2011, 06:17 AM »
As promised pictures to follow. BUT, after looking at my camera work I realize I need to do better, even if these pictures are of two just beginning trees. If I can not get good photos now, why should I believe I will do better with more advanced trees. I must learn.