Author Topic: Toyo Nishiki Japanese Flowering Quince  (Read 9677 times)

Jay

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Toyo Nishiki Japanese Flowering Quince
« on: January 07, 2011, 03:25 PM »
With the New Year I thought I'd try and 'Do it Right', document a tree (or two) from beginning to ....

In late December I received Bill Valavanis' catalog of bare root seedlings and pre-bonsai. a few things caught my eye. The one that really stood out was the Japanese Flowering Quince.

You order from Bill with hope and respect for his knowledge and reputation, without actually seeing the tree(s) you will get. I have ordered Bareroot trees in the past and was not disappointed. I am sure I will not be this time either. The two trees I ordered were Pre-Bonsai from 3 gallon stock, 12 to 15 inches tall. They are listed as having 'heavy trunks with many branches'.

I am interested in hearing any thoughts on this species. Do you have one? How has it been for you. I plan on doing the best I can to document these trees from their arrival.  The brochure says that the bareroot trees will ship from early January through March.

Stay tuned for updates

Jay
 

shimsuki

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Re: Toyo Nishiki Japanese Flowering Quince
« Reply #1 on: January 07, 2011, 05:41 PM »
We have 3 that we are experimenting with, got them last year right after flowering. Can't say much since I have only had them a year, but so far so good.

Good Luck, I look forward to some photos when they arrive!


Andrew

 

John Kirby

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Re: Toyo Nishiki Japanese Flowering Quince
« Reply #2 on: January 07, 2011, 07:08 PM »
I bought a number of them (touyo nishiki and other varieties) from Miniature Plant Kingdom a number of years ago, interesting trees. THe fall repotting has been a key. John
 

shimsuki

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Re: Toyo Nishiki Japanese Flowering Quince
« Reply #3 on: January 07, 2011, 09:29 PM »
Why do you repot in the fall?

Thanks,
Andrew
 

John Kirby

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Re: Toyo Nishiki Japanese Flowering Quince
« Reply #4 on: January 07, 2011, 10:23 PM »
A number of diseases and the ability of the tree to respond to stress, repot in fall, the roots stsrt to grow and the tree activates and flowers. Flowering quince majic!
 

Jay

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Re: Toyo Nishiki Japanese Flowering Quince
« Reply #5 on: January 08, 2011, 05:57 AM »
John and Andrew, Thanks for the thoughts. I read about the need to transplant in the fall, I'll keep that in mind. I also read that they do not like to dry out. Suggestions to water twice a day during the growing season and once a day while dormant.
Have you found this to be true? Also, I plan on over wintering in my sunroom. I keep the sunroom in the low to mid 30's F. Do you think they will be happy?

I plan to take pictures all along the way with these two. Hopefully it will be useful to others and a photographic history for me.

Jay
 

John Kirby

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Re: Toyo Nishiki Japanese Flowering Quince
« Reply #6 on: January 08, 2011, 08:30 AM »
Jay, sounds good, mine are in gallon pots now, they tend to be watered once aweek in tge late fall/winter, daily in the summer- but have been kept under 30% shade cloth in Arkansas (plastic in the winter) and never seem to be completely dormsnt. Good luck, Bill is a quality person, you will have fun with thequince- can be great color in the winter, mine bloom before, during and a little after the Ume.

John
 

meushi

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Re: Toyo Nishiki Japanese Flowering Quince
« Reply #7 on: January 08, 2011, 09:49 AM »
My limited experience with Japanese flowering quinces:
-they must get a cold winter to flower profusely (I have a variety that flowers pretty much year round if left outside all winter)
-cuttings root very easily, as long as they are in leaf
-repot between late August and late October
-feed from April to end of October
-subject to root cankers, cut off, disinfect tools with bleach, dunk the healthy roots in diluted jin liquid to be on the safe side. If the canker has spread to the entire root system, cut to a healthy area and treat like a large cutting.
-very slow to thicken, remove suckers as they appear. With proper technique, you might be able to get a decent mame trunk in a decade.
 

Jay

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Re: Toyo Nishiki Japanese Flowering Quince
« Reply #8 on: January 08, 2011, 12:26 PM »
Thanks Meushi, I'll keep those things in mind. Not having seen the trees yet, It is not possible to say which way I'll go. But as John said, Bill is a class act, I'm not worried about value or development. These trees will be a nice addition to my collection.

As soon as they arrive, bare root, I'll take pictures and we all can comment.

J
 

mcpesq817

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Re: Toyo Nishiki Japanese Flowering Quince
« Reply #9 on: January 08, 2011, 02:53 PM »
My limited experience with Japanese flowering quinces:
-they must get a cold winter to flower profusely (I have a variety that flowers pretty much year round if left outside all winter)
-cuttings root very easily, as long as they are in leaf
-repot between late August and late October
-feed from April to end of October
-subject to root cankers, cut off, disinfect tools with bleach, dunk the healthy roots in diluted jin liquid to be on the safe side. If the canker has spread to the entire root system, cut to a healthy area and treat like a large cutting.
-very slow to thicken, remove suckers as they appear. With proper technique, you might be able to get a decent mame trunk in a decade.

That's been my experience with flowering quince as well over the past couple of years.  I bought a bunch of varieties from Brent of www.evergreengardenworks.com in the fall of 09 which have done really well.  They flowered like gangbusters this year, and even this winter a number of them have tons of flowers.

The only thing I'd say is that they do appear to be slow to thicken up.  Some of those larger flowering quince you see in Japan are decades old.  But, overall they are fun to play with and the flowers are always nice.
 

Jay

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Re: Toyo Nishiki Japanese Flowering Quince
« Reply #10 on: January 08, 2011, 03:53 PM »
Well, it sounds like these will be perfect. Flowers in the late winter/spring and possible all year. I'll remember that they will not thicken up too quickly and design accordingly.

Thanks everyone for their thoughts.... keep them coming!

J
 

JRob

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Re: Toyo Nishiki Japanese Flowering Quince
« Reply #11 on: January 10, 2011, 08:00 PM »
Jay,

If you can find a copy International Bonsai 2006/No. 1 it was devoted to Flowering Quince. I picked up a copy shortly after Shim and I picked up our 3 Toyo Nishiki Quince. One of our club members was giving away copies of his older issues to anyone who wanted them. It has the following articles that may be of interest.

Developing Japanese Flowering Quince Miniature Bonsai, By Keizo Tachibaba, Craig W. Risser, Wm. M. Valavanis
How To Grow & Style Japanese Flowering Quince Bonsai, By Kageo Ono, Craig W. Risser
Maintaining Finished Bonsai - Part 7 Japanese Flowering Quince, By Kageo Ono, Craig W. Risser
Japanese Flowering Quince - Cultivars & Bonsai Training, By Brent Walston
The Seasonal Beauty Of Takeyyama Bonsai - Part 24 Quince, By Hiroshi Takeyama
Creating Clump Style Japanese Flowering Quince Bonsai, By Jiro Fukuda, Craig W. Risser
Dorie's Shohin Bonsai Tips - Japanese Flowering Quince, By Doris W. Froning.

Good Luck!

JRob

 

Jay

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Re: Toyo Nishiki Japanese Flowering Quince
« Reply #12 on: January 11, 2011, 06:20 AM »
JRob, Thank You!!  This is a classic case of being to close to the forest to see the trees (or possible just a bit lazy) I have a fairly good collection of International Bonsai. I checked and I do have that issue. Thank You again for pointing it out. The last issue 2010/4 is on flowering bonsai and has some info on Toyo Nishiki. I will be reading and studing 2006/1.

Do not know when my trees will ship but I'll be looking for then and as said before will try and do a good job of doing a photo journal.

Jay
 

Jerry Norbury

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Re: Toyo Nishiki Japanese Flowering Quince
« Reply #13 on: January 11, 2011, 07:19 AM »
I have a big fat quince that I pulled out of my front garden border 5 years ago. I think it's probably as old as the house - 40 years old.

Here's a photo progression starts in February 2006.
 

Jerry Norbury

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Re: Toyo Nishiki Japanese Flowering Quince
« Reply #14 on: January 11, 2011, 07:21 AM »
April 2010 and May 2010.

The trunk base at the roots is 8-9 inches, maybe more.

The long vertical branch will get cut off this year after flowering.