Author Topic: Flowering Quince  (Read 3713 times)

AlexV

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Flowering Quince
« on: October 05, 2011, 06:51 PM »
This is a Red flowering Quince I bought three years ago as a twig in a 2in pot from Lone Pine Gardens in Sebastopol Ca.  I have had it growing in a 2 gal pond basket since then.  Tonight I repotted it into a Bunzan pot I picked up from Boon a year ago or so for this tree.  It is 5 inches tall by 7 inches wide.  The tree still needs a lot of work, as several branches could use some bend, and further ramification across, but as it is really just a platform for the blooms, I figured i would get it into a pot as the initial structure is there.  The tree will be kept indoors this winter, but by controlling the lights i hope to induce it to flower anyways.  I will post pictures when it flowers.
 

fredtruck

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Re: Flowering Quince
« Reply #1 on: October 15, 2011, 09:21 AM »
Normally, flowering quince need some period of dormancy. You may be able to keep your tree going by keeping it under light a few years, but eventually, it will die. I suggest keeping it in a refrigerator for about 6 weeks, and then bringing it out into an unheated space until the weather is more suitable for putting it outside.
 

wmb13

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Re: Flowering Quince
« Reply #2 on: October 15, 2011, 01:08 PM »
From what I've read, Quince are not likely to flower unless given a nice cold dormancy period.
They usually bloom on bare bare branches before the leaves even open.
 

AlexV

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Re: Flowering Quince
« Reply #3 on: October 16, 2011, 05:37 PM »
I have trees that live under lamps going 24/7 all year round and are quite happy after 4 years of that treatment.  To send them into dormancy they just need 12 hours of dark per day.  It isn't the cold that makes them dormant, it is the light.  Even dormancy isn't required for most species, they will just keep growing like a never ending summer unless you want them to bloom.  Then just control the light to trick them into thinking it is winter.  Even a normal incandescent light is enough to screw up dormancy indoors, they need a full 12 hours of pitch black.  The idea that plants can't tolerate 24 hours of light a day is a myth, as is plants needing cold for dormancy, though some mountain plants like white pines like a certain amount of cold.  Those I just don't grow inside.  However, sticking a tree in a refrigerator is a very bad idea based on every bonsai professional i have spoken to.
 

coh

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Re: Flowering Quince
« Reply #4 on: October 16, 2011, 06:41 PM »
I don't know about quince specifically, but I'm pretty sure there are a number of species that require a certain amount of cold in order to flower the following year...lilac and crabapple come to mind. They may grow without a cold dormant period, but may not flower/fruit. Or, they may grow for a while (years) but eventually weaken without the cold dormancy. Of course, I could be remembering that wrong...

However, I do know that some growers (Jerry Mieslek, I think? not sure about the spelling) have successfully grown plants for many years under lights without a cold dormant period. Not sure if they are species normally grown for flowers/fruit?

Chris
 

John Kirby

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Re: Flowering Quince
« Reply #5 on: October 16, 2011, 09:26 PM »
UM, Jerry raises tropicals in Montana.

Good luck Alex. Maybe it is the sausage?

John
 

coh

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Re: Flowering Quince
« Reply #6 on: October 16, 2011, 09:47 PM »
My mistake, I meant Jack Wikle. Regardless, though, the point was that I've been told that certain individuals (Jack being one of them) have successfully grown some non-tropical plants indoors, under lights, without a dormant period for many years. Plants that I would normally expect to require, or at least benefit from, a cold dormant period. But I don't think all species can be treated that way.

Chris
 

AlexV

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Re: Flowering Quince
« Reply #7 on: October 17, 2011, 12:04 PM »
It is true that some trees really don't like it.  I leave my pines and junipers outside next to the house during the winter, but trees in small pots die outside in Michigan since I can't afford a greenhouse, hence bringing the little quince inside.  I unfortunately got a little greedy and picked up too many trees that need to come inside, so I don't have my usual closet set up for a different light cycle, so I will have to test out the flowering by lights next year. 

The tropicals love 24/7 light and grow faster inside in the summer than they do outside.  I also have Elms, Quince (flowering and chinese), Ilex Seratta, Azalia, Ume and Princess Persimmon that I winter indoors under 24/7 and they love it.  My trees outside have shut down now for winter, and my indoor plants are growing happily.  Granted, when I get done with gradual school and have a real job task one is getting a greenhouse that will never drop below 40 F, then the non tropicals can go out there and have a normal winter.

As for this tree, it needs growth at the moment, and leaving it outside would probably kill it and or shatter the pot.  I have lost a lot of pots in Michigan due to the freeze/thaw/freeze/thaw winters we get here in Ann Arbor, so a couple winters of growth will probably help it along.

Thanks for looking all.
Alex

 

Jerry Norbury

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Re: Flowering Quince
« Reply #8 on: October 17, 2011, 03:10 PM »
Interesting - I find them to be very hardy. These red Japanese Quince are used here (in Holland) as hedging bushes in suburban areas - near schools and public sidewalks. There's a line of them 100ft long between my house and the bus stop. They are a blaze of colour in April and May.
I read some advice to take hardwood cuttings while the flowers are blooming - which I do every year - and a good percentage of them root. Here's a one year old...(probably 5 year old wood).

 

AlexV

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Re: Flowering Quince
« Reply #9 on: October 17, 2011, 10:14 PM »
The quinces in the ground or grow pots are fine, it is when i try to put one in a shohin pot I have problems.  The roots just don't get enough protection in a tiny pot and I lost several quinces in small pots, and some of the pots shattered as well.  Since this tree is really small, and I really like the pot, I figured it wiser to keep it inside for now.  Same with my my brand new cuttings, they just don't have the roots to survive the cold winter, so they stay indoors.  When i get them into grow pots they will stay outside.

Oh, and Jerry, I am totally jealous, I want a hedge of quince!

Alex