Author Topic: Prunus mume 'Peggy Clarke'  (Read 1847 times)

bwaynef

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Prunus mume 'Peggy Clarke'
« on: April 01, 2014, 11:47 AM »
I was recently given a Prunus mume 'Peggy Clarke' in a 2-3 gallon nursery pot.  It was in very poor soil and I was told that it hadn't been repotted in quite a while (which was likely why it hadn't flowered in a while).  I promptly repotted it and managed to get it into a MUCH smaller terra cotta azalea pot.  There are plenty of roots to sustain the tree (unless Ume are a lot more sensitive to having their roots messed with than a normal tree), so I'm wondering if I ought to prune the tree now.  Most information I've seen is that the tree should've flowered by now, so a post-flowering prune to 1 or 2 flower buds might be in order.  After an initial repot, does anyone know why that might not be wise?

(Pics coming.)

Thanks,
 

bwaynef

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Re: Prunus mume 'Peggy Clarke'
« Reply #1 on: April 02, 2014, 09:21 AM »
Now that things are right-side-up, any takers?
 

MatsuBonsai

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Re: Prunus mume 'Peggy Clarke'
« Reply #2 on: April 02, 2014, 09:47 AM »
 :wwo
 

thomas tynan

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Re: Prunus mume 'Peggy Clarke'
« Reply #3 on: April 02, 2014, 11:44 AM »
Many possible reasons why a Prunus Mume has not flowered in any given year. Pruning at the wrong time of year can prevent the flower buds from developing. Heat stress during mid to late summer, and a very warm fall - can all cause drying and dropping of the leaves. Fungal problems that most prunus sp. are subject to can all cause stress that delays the development of the flower buds.

If you have not seen flower buds develop over the early to late winter - you will unlikely see any flowers this year. Flower buds are distinct from leaf buds. Let the tree grow this year and do not prune back until you can see the difference between leaf and flower buds.

Yes...a picture would help...but that alone will not clarify why your tree has not flowered. Give it one years growth with a good dose of fertilizer for flowering trees and you may see flower buds next year. Good luck....Tom
« Last Edit: April 02, 2014, 11:47 AM by thomas tynan »
 

bwaynef

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Re: Prunus mume 'Peggy Clarke'
« Reply #4 on: April 02, 2014, 01:12 PM »
Many possible reasons why a Prunus Mume has not flowered in any given year.
...
Yes...a picture would help...but that alone will not clarify why your tree has not flowered.

Thanks for all that information.  I'm going to tuck it away and refer to it later.  Right now though, I'm more interested in the health (and long-term maintainability) of the tree rather than getting it to flower (which I'd imagine is due in large part to being in some of the worst soil I've seen, only slight faster draining than field clay).

I understand that they don't backbud reliably so would like to maintain as compact a canopy as possible while getting to know this tree.
 

Owen Reich

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Re: Prunus mume 'Peggy Clarke'
« Reply #5 on: April 03, 2014, 12:04 AM »
I have an article about Prunus mume coming out in the next International Bonsai Magazine.  Should answer some questions you have.  Good magazine.
 

thomas tynan

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Re: Prunus mume 'Peggy Clarke'
« Reply #6 on: April 03, 2014, 11:39 AM »
I will look for Owen' s article when this issue comes out. 

As far as pruning to create a compact canopy - be careful as repeated prunings (at the wrong time of year) can prevent the development of the flowering buds. Tom
 

Owen Reich

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Re: Prunus mume 'Peggy Clarke'
« Reply #7 on: April 03, 2014, 09:24 PM »
I will say this for now:  New branches lignify very quickly so wire new growth with aluminum wire and be prepared to remove it quickly to avoid cutting in.  Apply bends on long new growth then cut back to 3-5 buds.  That will keep growth more compact.