Author Topic: Prunus angustfolia  (Read 31509 times)

tmmason10

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Re: Prunus angustfolia
« Reply #15 on: March 05, 2015, 10:01 AM »
Looks great Paul! Mine is spending it's winter at NE Bonsai where the temps I believe are kept in the 40-50 range. I don't think it will flower but I also haven't seen it since November!
 

SpongeMann

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Re: Prunus angustfolia
« Reply #16 on: March 05, 2015, 01:30 PM »
Thank you Ken. I will get that layer going this week. TMMason10 I juse noticed you are in Mass. I grew up out there in New Bedford from 83 to 98. How about them PATRIOTS! I get so much trash talk from my buddies. They call me a Yankee  and me being a hardcore Red Socks fan you know how that goes.
 

tmmason10

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Re: Prunus angustfolia
« Reply #17 on: March 05, 2015, 01:53 PM »
Cool, my brother is a music teacher at new Bedford actually. We just closed on a house in North Attleboro which means I'll be back to 20 mins from NE Bonsai.
 

vernG

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Re: Prunus angustfolia
« Reply #18 on: March 05, 2015, 10:50 PM »
Hi folks, just some open (shotgun blast) advice on air layering wild plumbs. First I am in NW FL and I keep wild plumbs for many reasons including root rakes, soil picks and stakes to name a few of the uses I put them to. Just try the air layer, it should only cost you a little moss and plastic. You can cut the roots a little distance from the main tree and you  should get new sprouts soon. I have found low branches that layered on their own and as always there are seeds. Most of these will sucker or grow in clumps and this is the best bet. We call pretty much all of the wild plumbs "Chickasaw", I believe Fl has 3 varieties of wild plumbs and they look pretty much the same, but they will pretty much not grow below Ocala, micro climates notwithstanding. So for me, having these like weeds, I save my layering efforts for hybrid plumbs.
I hope this helps.
Vern
 

pjkatich

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Re: Prunus angustfolia
« Reply #19 on: March 06, 2015, 08:05 PM »
Very nice Paul! I really like the wild character of this one; you've done very well with it. I don't think I would wire it too much if it were mine. Just personal preference. :) -- In a pot you made as well?

Hi Dan,

I appreciate your kind words very much. 

Typically I don't do much wiring on this species.  Now that it has flowered, I will trim most of the branches back hard and wire a few of them that are in good spots.  I don't prune much during the growing season because most of the flowers develop wood of the previous season.

And yes, the pot is one that I designed and made for this tree.

Thanks for taking the time to comment.

Regards,
Paul
 

pjkatich

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Re: Prunus angustfolia
« Reply #20 on: March 06, 2015, 08:21 PM »
Looks great Paul! Mine is spending it's winter at NE Bonsai where the temps I believe are kept in the 40-50 range. I don't think it will flower but I also haven't seen it since November!

Hi Tom!

I appreciate the compliment very much.

Quite a difference from the last time you saw this tree isn't it.   This plum was damaged in a storm 3 years ago.  Not long after I took the photo below.  A large branch came down from one of the oaks growing in my yard; hit this tree and broke it's back.  It was a heart breaking moment.  I though for sure I would have to regrow the top again.

Fortunately, I was able to perform CPR on the plum.  I wired the fracture back together and allowed the tree to grow unchecked for the next two seasons until the live vein was strong enough to support itself.  So, with the help of mother nature, this plum went from informal upright to cascade in one day.

I hope you get as much pleasure out of your plum as I have gotten out of this one.  I look forward to seeing what you can do with yours.

Cheers,
Paul
 

John Kirby

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Re: Prunus angustfolia
« Reply #21 on: March 07, 2015, 07:52 AM »
Design assistance by Mother Nature. Very nice, I think I like it better now, would have to see in person. Very nice use of great local material.
 

SpongeMann

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Re: Prunus angustfolia
« Reply #22 on: March 08, 2015, 01:57 AM »
That's  pretty cool mason. Paul the tree looks great. How big does the fruit grow on your tree?Vern wild Plums aren't too common  over here in Hernando county I'm sure they are out here. My uncle is the only person I know that has one. It was on his property when he bought it.
 

pjkatich

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Re: Prunus angustfolia
« Reply #23 on: March 08, 2015, 02:12 PM »
Design assistance by Mother Nature. Very nice, I think I like it better now, would have to see in person. Very nice use of great local material.

Hi John,

I have attached a couple of photos of the damaged area.  Now that the tree has fully recovered from the accident, I need to work out a few issues with the site of the break.  Any thoughts?

Mother Nature has played a large role in the development of this tree.  All the dead wood is a direct result of borers.  Early on, I lost a number of trees due to borers.  Then I figured out how to keep them at bay.  I use a systemic that contains Merit several times a year.   No more borers problems.

Thanks for taking the time to comment on my tree.

Regards,
Paul
 

pjkatich

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Re: Prunus angustfolia
« Reply #24 on: March 08, 2015, 02:19 PM »
That's  pretty cool mason. Paul the tree looks great. How big does the fruit grow on your tree?Vern wild Plums aren't too common  over here in Hernando county I'm sure they are out here. My uncle is the only person I know that has one. It was on his property when he bought it.

The fruit of this species is small.  Normally around 1/2" to 3/4" is length.

As a general rule, I do not let my plums set fruit.  The drupes attract the local varmints (raccoons and opossums) who like to pull the tree down of the bench when the fruit starts to ripen.  Also, letting the tree set and ripen fruit tends to weaken the tree. 

Regards,
Paul
 

John Kirby

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Re: Prunus angustfolia
« Reply #25 on: March 08, 2015, 07:20 PM »
Paul, great pictures! I really like this tree and what you have done with it. The hsrd part is to accept natures work and then to present it in the best way possible. You have done so.
 

SpongeMann

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Re: Prunus angustfolia
« Reply #26 on: March 08, 2015, 10:48 PM »
 Hey fellas. John well said. Paul the tree took a good hit! That wound gives it so much character and it  looks very healthy and strong. I really want one now. I have to find a systematic for my trees and plants to rid them of borers and symbiotic ants. Which seem to love my pyracanthas or deadwood. My property is being invaded by moles and rabbits which  are munching on my plants and their roots. I have been giving  the mole tunnels and the plant perimeter a habanero shower which seems to be working .I also bought a vinyl parrot  that you stake in the ground . The tail spins in the wind and it seems to keep the rabbits away.