Author Topic: Monster Porcelain Berry  (Read 20700 times)

Zach Smith

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Re: Monster Porcelain Berry
« Reply #15 on: July 05, 2015, 06:45 PM »
not letting birds disribute the fruit is the reason. many states have it on their invasive specieslists. I believe Michigan and illinois list it.
Makes sense.
 

coh

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Re: Monster Porcelain Berry
« Reply #16 on: July 05, 2015, 09:16 PM »
Interesting...I have a million seedlings coming up around the location of the mother plant, which suggests the seeds sprout pretty easily. But, I've never seen birds going after the fruit, and I don't have it coming up elsewhere on the property. On the other hand, poison ivy and pokeweed, that stuff is everywhere.
 

The Hidden Gardens

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Re: Monster Porcelain Berry
« Reply #17 on: July 06, 2015, 08:26 PM »
Owen, I have one in the back fence it is very large. I need to go look at the stump as it has been there for 18 years. I keep it there because it is the first plant to be attacked by the Japanese beetle, then I know it time to set the traps for my other plants.
 

Owen Reich

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Re: Monster Porcelain Berry
« Reply #18 on: July 07, 2015, 01:48 PM »
They make great bonsai Jeff.  Perhaps Bill Valavanis would like to share a few photos of his nice ones here......  ;D
 

GastroGnome

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Re: Monster Porcelain Berry
« Reply #19 on: July 15, 2015, 02:38 AM »
Zach, Ampelopsis brevipedunculata has been spotted naturalized in Alabama according to the government types.  I'd say it should be just fine down there.  A few friends have grown it successfully in Memphis, TN.  I'd get a little one and don't let the fruit get distributed.......  Pretty sure Ryan Bell has one in Jackson, MS so you should be good to go.  It's not native to the United States and seems to be aggressive when given room to grow.

Looking forward to the repot next year and removal of the large exposed roots.  Vines are so rewarding.  Thanks go to Chris (coh) for the material.


Pretty sure he has a 6 or 7
Of them, actually.  They seem to thrive for me here. 
 

William N. Valavanis

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Re: Monster Porcelain Berry
« Reply #20 on: July 15, 2015, 06:53 PM »
Here are a couple photos of my Porcelain berry bonsai. I've learned that all the branches must be retrained each year to create a bonsai. Only the trunk and heavy limbs remain.
 

GastroGnome

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Re: Monster Porcelain Berry
« Reply #21 on: July 15, 2015, 09:16 PM »
How heavy of they need to be To prevent dieback Bill?
 

William N. Valavanis

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Re: Monster Porcelain Berry
« Reply #22 on: July 15, 2015, 10:40 PM »
Branches about pencil size do not die back. Japanese beetles love Porcelain berry foliage. I always have the pots sitting in a shallow saucer during the summer when the berries are forming after blossoming.
 

augustine

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Re: Monster Porcelain Berry
« Reply #23 on: July 17, 2015, 11:52 AM »
I have two that were purchased from Mr. Valavanis' catalog and love them. Easy to grow and very beautiful. They form nice gnarly roots.

Will post pics.

Ray
 

Owen Reich

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Re: Monster Porcelain Berry
« Reply #24 on: September 01, 2015, 12:26 AM »
Quick update on the project.  Chopped off more "trunks" and started the final decision making process for the future style of the monster.  A sculptor in San Antonio and I are working on an outdoor suitable sculpture to contain this thing.  We're going to use Surecrete.  This stuff is wonderful.  When you have a minute, watch a few videos on YouTube where they bend concrete. www.surecretedesign.com

The final design will either grow up and out, or cascade.  While full cascade is likely with the side of the container being vertical, I'm not sure what happens when you cut off most of an old porcelain berry vine.

The final photo will likely be the "back", but my intention is to create something viewable from three sides.
« Last Edit: September 01, 2015, 12:31 AM by Owen Reich »
 

Judy

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Re: Monster Porcelain Berry
« Reply #25 on: September 01, 2015, 07:32 AM »
Seems like the more you take off of this thing, the bigger it looks.  How heavy is that concrete stuff going to be?
 

coh

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Re: Monster Porcelain Berry
« Reply #26 on: September 01, 2015, 11:54 AM »
Good to see progress! Can't wait to see how this continues to evolve.

Owen, the fence is completely covered by porcelain berry vines again...all the seedlings this one left behind. Also, some of the roots we left behind have sprouted. Some of those might be collectible.

Chris
 

Owen Reich

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Re: Monster Porcelain Berry
« Reply #27 on: September 01, 2015, 01:51 PM »
Perhaps others here will want them  ;D
 

coh

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Re: Monster Porcelain Berry
« Reply #28 on: September 01, 2015, 02:39 PM »
Yeah, I wasn't suggesting you should come and get them  ;) I will probably dig some of them out and offer them to club members or via the facebook groups. They're all small...ultimately I want to eliminate all traces of porcelain berry vine from that area. It may take a while!
 

Owen Reich

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Re: Monster Porcelain Berry
« Reply #29 on: September 25, 2015, 10:52 PM »
Judy, the concrete won't be super heavy as the cylinder will be largely hollow.  Will it be light? No. Perhaps 100lbs.  But, it will be suitable for a heavy plant growing out the side of it. 

Given the alternatives to concrete, achieving my goal with other media may actually be heavier and/or with a much higher fail rate.  Looking forward to the repot next Spring into better mix at closer to the final planting angle.