Author Topic: Little Chojubai  (Read 8961 times)

BonsaiEngineer1493

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Little Chojubai
« on: June 11, 2014, 10:07 PM »
Hey,

I caught the bug too. Thank you Don!
 

Brian Van Fleet

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Re: Little Chojubai
« Reply #1 on: June 11, 2014, 10:59 PM »
Very nice!
 

Don Blackmond

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Re: Little Chojubai
« Reply #2 on: June 12, 2014, 07:06 AM »
Give it lots of water and sun.  Fertilize and it will grow like a weed.  Once you repot (Fall only) into a bonsai pot, the trunk and base will be better exposed and will show just how big and great they are.
 

BonsaiEngineer1493

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Re: Little Chojubai
« Reply #3 on: June 12, 2014, 09:27 AM »
I am not knowledgable in pots. It would be great if you guys can throw suggests at me!
 

Chrisl

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Re: Little Chojubai
« Reply #4 on: June 12, 2014, 09:59 AM »
I love it!  Nice pickup.  Don, I hadn't heard of only fall repotting w. chojubai.  Is this something new?
 

Don Blackmond

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Re: Little Chojubai
« Reply #5 on: June 12, 2014, 10:19 AM »
Don, I hadn't heard of only fall repotting w. chojubai.  Is this something new?

Nope, nothing new.  I will slip pot in the spring but root work is a fall thing for chojubai.  I have done root work in the spring.  But, I have read and been told that root work should occur in the Fall. otherwise there is a risk of nematodes that can weaken your tree.
 

Chrisl

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Re: Little Chojubai
« Reply #6 on: June 12, 2014, 11:57 AM »
I had not heard this before Don, Thanks. 
 

BonsaiEngineer1493

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Re: Little Chojubai
« Reply #7 on: June 12, 2014, 01:08 PM »
Don, why in the fall? Usually deciduous trees are transplanted when the buds are swollen which is late winter or early spring. My experience, ume and other deciduous  fruit/flowering trees are transplanted after it's done flowering. Can you explain?
 

Owen Reich

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Re: Little Chojubai
« Reply #8 on: June 12, 2014, 02:35 PM »
Chojubai have strong a weak periods as they are a shrub that sheds branches as a means to support itself.   The article I wrote in International Bonsai (forgot issue)  Bill??? covers a number of points on creation and care.  Michael Hagedorn's blog also has extensive information; recently about the two different types of growth.  My article is a comprehensive summary of almost everything I know about the cultivar. 

Sorry to jump in on this.

 To answer your question, the nematodes are active in Spring and the repotting process injures roots and stresses the plant allowing the nematodes to have a full year to multiply and infest.  Fall inhibits their march through the media and the shrub preps for winter flowering with Fall root flush.

Don has some nice chojubai available at a number of price ranges including some like the one posted not fully refined.  I'd get them now before people start really scrambling for National Exhibition supporting display elements like these.....
 

Judy

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Re: Little Chojubai
« Reply #9 on: June 12, 2014, 02:36 PM »
Are there any other species that have the same nematode issue that fall potting would be a particularly good idea?
good info to have in the tool kit.
 

Adair M

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Re: Little Chojubai
« Reply #10 on: June 12, 2014, 02:42 PM »
BonsaiEngineer:

Good pickup!  I was trying to buy that one, but Don had just sold it to you.  I bought another one.
 

BonsaiEngineer1493

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Re: Little Chojubai
« Reply #11 on: June 12, 2014, 10:08 PM »
Thank you everyone! I just subscribed to Bill's magazine. Owen, it will definitely have your topic on chojubai. Look forward to reading it.
 

John Kirby

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Re: Little Chojubai
« Reply #12 on: June 13, 2014, 12:24 AM »
Maybe Bill will weigh in, based on his advice I have been repotting all quince (including Chojubai) in the spring. But the Japanese literature does suggest fall. In a really cold climate,without adequate protection, I would be careful.
 

William N. Valavanis

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Re: Little Chojubai
« Reply #13 on: June 13, 2014, 06:59 AM »
I agree 100% with John. In cold areas of the world, like ours, I recommend all Japanese and Chinese quince be transplanted in spring. Autumn cold comes too quickly around here.

But, I have a question for all of you. Have you ever seen nematodes on a quince, any species? I have never seen it, but only have been transplanting quince for 50 years. Perhaps the next 50 will prove me different… but I will not last that long, I HOPE.

Good luck to everyone who transplants their quince anytime. As long as it works for you, continue on. IF you have problems, consider switching.

Bill
 

BonsaiEngineer1493

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Re: Little Chojubai
« Reply #14 on: June 13, 2014, 07:14 AM »
On my other contorted quince I made cuttings right before the leafs were popping out of the swollen buds. Out of 6 cuttings only one survived. I noticed that on the chojubai I have extended shoots. I want to use them to create cuttings. When is the best time to create cuttings for chojubai? In addition when I made cuttings my first time I followed the procedure in bill's magazine that focused on flowering quince. Should the procedure be followed in the same manner?