Author Topic: Dreaming of Quince  (Read 5950 times)

JRob

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Dreaming of Quince
« on: November 16, 2011, 09:31 PM »
I am sitting hear sipping a nice cup of Blooming Tiger tea next to the fireplace (temperature is dropping to near freezing for the first time this fall) and flipping through issues of International Bonsai looking for a project to begin next spring. I ran across two issues that have given me a possible choice. In the 2006/No. 1 there is an article describing the techniques for creating miniature bonsai using Japanese flowering quince. It was first appeared in 1976 and was written by Keizo Tachibana. In IB it was translated by Craig Risser. In the 2010/No. 4 issue there is an article on developing multiple trunk Japanese flowering quince bonsai by Hiroshi Takeyama from 1974 translated by Peter & Satomi Warren. Both were edited by William Valavanis. 2 years ago I purchased 3 young seedlings of Toyo Niskhiki and potted them in oversized pots and let them go "wild". Their trunks are now about the size of a yellow Major Accent Highlighter. I keep them on the bench because I love their early flower display. Mine bloom profusely and put on a spectacular show. I am going to flow the 5 year plan detailed in the articles and in the end should have a very nice multiple trunk shohin. By the time Drew is my age they should be a spectacular specimen on his bench. I have not even put the trees to bed for the winter and I am already wishing fro spring. Got to love the way bonsai teaches us patience and to dream of trees to be.

JRob
 

bonsaiTom

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Re: Dreaming of Quince
« Reply #1 on: November 17, 2011, 05:50 AM »
Nicely thought out and wonderfully written!
Thank you.
 

Adair M

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Re: Dreaming of Quince
« Reply #2 on: November 17, 2011, 07:50 AM »
That story reminds me of a cartoon that appeared in a Japanese language bonsai magazine I used to subscribe to way back in the early '80's.  I think it was "Contemporary Bonsai", but since I can't read Japanese except for a few characters, I don't know.  I used to get them thru Bill Valavanis.  They have amazing photos of trees in training over the years and detailed drawings of training techniques.  I have 3 or 4 years of them.

Anyway, the cartoon shows a man and his daughter going to the bonsai shop, and picking out a stock piece, taking it home, putting it on the turntable and considering all the angles.  Then it shows him, wiring, trimming, watering over the years.  It shows the passage of time over the seasons, and how the bonsai developed, and eventually shows him as a bonsai master sipping tea next to his masterpiece in his senior years.

The last panel shows him in bed, with the newly purchased tree on the headboard, with the pricetag still attached.  The panels of the progress of the tree over the years is what he is dreaming while he is sleeping...


 

JRob

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Re: Dreaming of Quince
« Reply #3 on: November 24, 2011, 10:59 AM »
This morning when I went out to look at the trees I noticed this past week buds have begun to set on the Toyo. Only thing I dislike these days now is that the only time I see my trees in daylight is on the weekends or if I take a vacation day.

JRob
 

JRob

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Re: Dreaming of Quince
« Reply #4 on: March 13, 2012, 07:24 PM »
We have two days of 80+ degree weather and the Toyo has opened her flowers. How lovely.

JRob
 

John Kirby

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Re: Dreaming of Quince
« Reply #5 on: March 14, 2012, 07:58 AM »
It is truly an odd year. My Toyo Nishiki and Boke are swelling tremendously, my Ume (white flowers) are just finishing- not a lot of blooms but some (I started them from seed about 10 years ago and then they were in the ground) now cut down and regrowing. Let's hope April is forgiving.......
 

Don Blackmond

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Re: Dreaming of Quince
« Reply #6 on: March 15, 2012, 09:19 PM »
It is truly an odd year.  Let's hope April is forgiving.......

could not have said it better.  mid 80's in mid march in michigan.  uh-oh...
 

Chrisl

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Re: Dreaming of Quince
« Reply #7 on: March 16, 2012, 10:22 AM »
Very nice flowers JRob!  ;))

And Hear Hear Don!

I have a few C. Chojubai that is quite rigid for such small branches and thorns...and a ? species of J. Quince that the stems are very flexible and no thorns.  Quite a variety.  Even though my Chojubai is only 6-8" tall, I'm planned to wire them up this weekend for a basic trunk shaping and then let it grow wild.  Being from 4" seedlings, no flowers for me this yr and maybe next.  But I can't wait to see the gorgeous red flowers.  Does this sound like a good plan?  I'm afraid if I wait a full year, I'll never be able to get the movement i want without maybe snapping the branches off.
 

John Kirby

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Re: Dreaming of Quince
« Reply #8 on: March 16, 2012, 02:30 PM »
Christi, the really contorted Chojubai (not Boke, the others, typically C. Speciosa and mislabeled most places, including my backyard as C japonica) are root cuttings. Look up root cuttings, can work pretty well, though I have not tried it with quince, just elms.
 

Chrisl

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Re: Dreaming of Quince
« Reply #9 on: March 16, 2012, 02:57 PM »
I got these as rooted seedlings from Megan's Miniature.  So they are really growing quick.  Hence my wiring question.
 

John Kirby

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Re: Dreaming of Quince
« Reply #10 on: March 16, 2012, 03:14 PM »
Chris, what I am saying is the really contorted Chojubai are roots, cut off of plants, inverted in a humid enclosure. The then revert to stem and leaf tissue and become the 'plant'. Make sense? They are stiff little buggar.
 

Chrisl

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Re: Dreaming of Quince
« Reply #11 on: March 17, 2012, 09:58 AM »
Oh I see John, you just turn the plant upside down, Kimura did that on one tree I read about.  Very interesting idea!  Will give it a try on one of them.  Thanks for the idea John!
 

John Kirby

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Re: Dreaming of Quince
« Reply #12 on: March 19, 2012, 08:09 AM »
No, not the same. Kimura's Juniper is a totally different thing, may never happen again, who knows. To do this- take chjubbai, remove from soil. Cut off interesting roots, tapered, etc. Place cut end of root in soil. water. cover in plastic bag or small humidity chamber, out of direct light. as the root begins to covert to stem and leaf tissue, begin to slowly wean from humidity (open side partially, etc). Result is contorted plant grown from root. aka root cutting. works well with stoloniferous plants and elms, among others.
 

Chrisl

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Re: Dreaming of Quince
« Reply #13 on: March 19, 2012, 09:09 AM »
Oh, I totally misunderstood that one John!  Now it makes more sense.  Thanks, I'll give it a try!