Author Topic: Cotoneaster 'Tom Thumb' Project; nebari creations and refinement  (Read 11680 times)

John Kirby

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Re: Cotoneaster 'Tom Thumb' Project; nebari creations and refinement
« Reply #15 on: August 26, 2014, 09:13 AM »
And I have access to unfettered Dark Fiber at work, but my photos are uploaded using the ultra highspeed basic Comcast internet with an off the shelf midrange wireless router/modem combo.  It does seem to be fastet than my pld analog dial up, well maybe.
 

coh

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Re: Cotoneaster 'Tom Thumb' Project; nebari creations and refinement
« Reply #16 on: August 26, 2014, 10:19 AM »
Well, it won't let me do anything near that.
The other solution is to just resize the images before uploading them. That's what I do, as I find that images that are roughly 600 pixels in the longest dimension work well in most cases. It takes a little time upfront, but not too bad if you're not uploading lots of images. Even a program as basic as microsoft paint will allow simple cropping, resizing, contrast adjustments and sharpening if needed.

Image below was 1600x1200 originally, cropped and resized to 600x450 before uploading.

 

Judy

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Re: Cotoneaster 'Tom Thumb' Project; nebari creations and refinement
« Reply #17 on: August 26, 2014, 10:40 AM »
I have used a resizing program to do that as well, but the easier thing to do is to just save them to your desktop as a medium sized image instead of large, or actual size.  That keeps me from having to resize them.
 

bwaynef

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Re: Cotoneaster 'Tom Thumb' Project; nebari creations and refinement
« Reply #18 on: August 26, 2014, 10:54 AM »
Before this thread is derailed much more than its already been, know that it is our intent to make it so that the image resizing works automatically, but we're still working those details out.  Apologies for the hassle.
 

coh

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Re: Cotoneaster 'Tom Thumb' Project; nebari creations and refinement
« Reply #19 on: August 26, 2014, 12:29 PM »
Feel free to delete my off topic posts on this thread, but since we're talking about it...How is the upload/auto sizing supposed to work? Should I be able, for example, to upload a 5 MB image (or even larger) and have the system automatically resize it to something reasonable? And does the system store that original large image or just the resized version?

It's interesting, the photo I  uploaded of the winterhazel shows a size of 107 kb for the original image on my computer, but when I downloaded the image that appears in the post it shows a size of 40 kb...yet appears to be the same image.

I looked at the link that was previously posted but didn't see a detailed explanation of the process, what was allowed, etc. If I missed it, please point me in the right direction. Thanks!
 

Owen Reich

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Re: Cotoneaster 'Tom Thumb' Project; nebari creations and refinement
« Reply #20 on: August 26, 2014, 07:27 PM »
Again.
 

Owen Reich

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Re: Cotoneaster 'Tom Thumb' Project; nebari creations and refinement
« Reply #21 on: August 26, 2014, 08:00 PM »
Closer
 

Owen Reich

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Re: Cotoneaster 'Tom Thumb' Project; nebari creations and refinement
« Reply #22 on: August 26, 2014, 08:02 PM »
And finally.
 

Owen Reich

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Re: Cotoneaster 'Tom Thumb' Project; nebari creations and refinement
« Reply #23 on: August 26, 2014, 08:10 PM »
and...
 

Owen Reich

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Re: Cotoneaster 'Tom Thumb' Project; nebari creations and refinement
« Reply #24 on: August 26, 2014, 08:11 PM »
...
 

Owen Reich

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Re: Cotoneaster 'Tom Thumb' Project; nebari creations and refinement
« Reply #25 on: August 27, 2014, 12:45 AM »
For the record, this project would have advanced much more quickly if I had seen the thing for more than a day or so a year in 2011 and 2012.  Almost nothing done to it at all in 2013.  A repot year three of the experiment and repositioning of each new surface root would have been best.  Once I've pared down the collection in September to about 20 plants, things will change much more quickly. 

I'd say the real reason this is interesting is that it could be done with other species like Ilex serrata.  Not saying it will work, but I had roots year one and could remove "branches" from new nebari year two.  I wanted to thicken the new surface roots.  There is likely a window when the most thickening and lowest chance of scarring or dieback occurs. 

 

John Kirby

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Re: Cotoneaster 'Tom Thumb' Project; nebari creations and refinement
« Reply #26 on: August 27, 2014, 05:43 AM »
Very interesting, thanks.
 

Judy

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Re: Cotoneaster 'Tom Thumb' Project; nebari creations and refinement
« Reply #27 on: August 27, 2014, 08:17 AM »
Ahhh, thanks for reposting these.  I will try this next year, looks like something that can work for me and my crab. 
 

augustine

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Re: Cotoneaster 'Tom Thumb' Project; nebari creations and refinement
« Reply #28 on: August 27, 2014, 09:20 AM »
Owen,

Thanks a million.

Ray
 

coh

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Re: Cotoneaster 'Tom Thumb' Project; nebari creations and refinement
« Reply #29 on: August 27, 2014, 09:37 AM »
New photos are much better, thanks for getting them posted! The issue I could see with I. serrata is that the wood is very brittle once it gets any size (learned that the hard way), so it might be tough to bend into position. I could see this maybe being used to advantage with flowering quinces since some of those sucker abundantly.

Chris