Author Topic: Chinese Quince  (Read 3155 times)

Judy

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Chinese Quince
« on: August 25, 2013, 11:51 AM »
Hi all,
I thought I'd try sharing a tree with you, it's a chinese quince (brilliant, as that is the subject line!).  I was planning on twin trunk for this, but as the split is so high, and narrow, I'm working more towards a broom.  There is a small branch just at the soil line that I'm using to feed roots on that side, I've pulled it down and away for the pictures.  There is more interest below the soil line, I hope to be able to gradually raise the tree. Comments and suggestions are most welcome.
 

Judy

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Re: Chinese Quince
« Reply #1 on: August 25, 2013, 11:58 AM »
A couple more older photos, to see where it's progression, and where it started this spring again. These do put on some growth!
 

bwaynef

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Re: Chinese Quince
« Reply #2 on: August 25, 2013, 07:24 PM »
The split so high up the tree doesn't, to my eye, look like the slingshot that we are cautioned to avoid.  I believe its the curve of the main trunk as well as the angularity of the smaller trunk/branch right after it leaves the main one that helps to make this one work.

You have the beginnings of a very powerful little tree.
 

Judy

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Re: Chinese Quince
« Reply #3 on: August 25, 2013, 08:54 PM »
Thanks, I hope it'll turn out.  At least progress is reasonably fast.  Not a slingshot, but the trunks seem a bit too close for a twin, no?  I'm hoping to use every angle away from each other, to accentuate what negative space there is. 
 

Neli

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Re: Chinese Quince
« Reply #4 on: November 15, 2013, 04:39 AM »
I would treat the second trunk as a branch, and after curving it behind it will look fine.
Why do you say this:
There is a small branch just at the soil line that I'm using to feed roots on that side, I've pulled it down and away for the pictures. 
Is it that  quince roots feed particular branches and they will die if no branches attached to them to draw auxine?
 

Brian Van Fleet

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Re: Chinese Quince
« Reply #5 on: November 15, 2013, 10:22 PM »
Looking good Judy; the structure is there.  I remember this one...still think splitting the trunks slightlyand spreading them just a bit would create a stronger image and add interest.  Though, as slow as they heal, it will take a few years to get it to roll.
 

Judy

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Re: Chinese Quince
« Reply #6 on: November 16, 2013, 10:04 AM »
Here is a current shot of the tree.  I'll probably reduce a bit more after the last leaves go.  I have never split anything, so don't know if that's where I'll go with it. I would hate to ruin it...   :-[
Neli, the branch that I was talking about is just to build up the base on that side, as it doesn't flare as much as the other side.  So a sacrifice branch but mainly for the roots to build.  I'll let it run again next year too.

 

Brian Van Fleet

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Re: Chinese Quince
« Reply #7 on: November 16, 2013, 11:28 AM »
Understood completely.  Seeing these quinces just makes me want to start on mine...it's one of a very few in the ground I'm really eager to dig up, even though I know a few more years in the ground is what it needs now to be a great bonsai later!
 

Neli

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Re: Chinese Quince
« Reply #8 on: November 16, 2013, 12:07 PM »
Thanks Judy,
I thought you mean to feed the roots like keep them alive...so since I have some quinces, I thought they are a bit like budleja or junipers...
 

Judy

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Re: Chinese Quince
« Reply #9 on: November 16, 2013, 12:47 PM »
Brian, you are a much more patient person than I. ;)  I do find that this large trainer gives me plenty of growth for a season, at least for the final image idea for this one...maybe you could get into a large box soon. Got a pic of the trunk?
 

Brian Van Fleet

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Re: Chinese Quince
« Reply #10 on: November 16, 2013, 01:34 PM »
This is it.  Still trying to decide if I can grow enough of a third section to make the second one look ok, or if I need to chop it again to halve the second section to get more movement and taper.  Guess it's a matter of how tall I want it to be in the end.
 

Judy

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Re: Chinese Quince
« Reply #11 on: November 16, 2013, 03:12 PM »
I see what you mean, that first section is so sweet, that you wouldn't want to have anything less for the rest.  But tell me have you ever considered the first section on it's own merit?  Could be a very powerful smaller tree.