Author Topic: Chickasaw Plum  (Read 17876 times)

tmmason10

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Re: Chickasaw Plum
« Reply #15 on: September 29, 2014, 10:39 PM »
Thanks Brian. I guess I was wondering how to avoid flower buds all together since it's in development. Should I have cut back in mid summer to avoid potential flower buds?
 

Brian Van Fleet

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Re: Chickasaw Plum
« Reply #16 on: September 29, 2014, 11:16 PM »
So you're pruning for branch development rather than for flowers at this point.  In that case, pruning throughout the growing season, clip-and-grow, will help encourage back-budding.  And because that stops extension growth, you'll have fewer flower buds, but tighter ramification.
 

Owen Reich

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Re: Chickasaw Plum
« Reply #17 on: September 30, 2014, 12:17 AM »
It would be great for Paul to share his insight on the species and technique application. 
 

tmmason10

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Re: Chickasaw Plum
« Reply #18 on: September 30, 2014, 06:36 AM »
So you're pruning for branch development rather than for flowers at this point.  In that case, pruning throughout the growing season, clip-and-grow, will help encourage back-budding.  And because that stops extension growth, you'll have fewer flower buds, but tighter ramification.
Thanks again Brian, that was the answer I was looking for. I was letting it grow out this year but I'll remember to do cutbacks during the growing season next year to get rid of potential flower buds.
 

tmmason10

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Re: Chickasaw Plum
« Reply #19 on: September 30, 2014, 06:47 AM »
It would be great for Paul to share his insight on the species and technique application. 

I agree, hopefully Paul chimes in. How have yours done this year Owen?
 

tmmason10

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Re: Chickasaw Plum
« Reply #20 on: November 16, 2014, 03:46 PM »
This is how we will leave things for the year. Gave it a little cutback but left runners in the apex. I think next year I might cut the apex down to the next section denoted by the red line. Possible future canopy as well.  Let me know what you think.
 

pjkatich

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Re: Chickasaw Plum
« Reply #21 on: November 16, 2014, 04:40 PM »
The plum is looking well Tom.

You've done a nice job with it this year.

Brian's pruning advise is sound.  If you are not worried about flowers, you can prune any time during the growing season.   Once the branch structure is set, you need to be careful how and when you prune.

This species normally produces flower buds in fascicles from buds of the previous seasons growth.  So, if you cut back hard on this years growth you loose flower buds.  In addition, I have noticed a tendency for the tree to develop flowering spurs on older wood when grown in a container.  These spurs will flower reliably every year so you need to be careful not to remove them.

On established trees, I will prune back hard when the flowers begin to fade in late winter.  I am careful not to remove any of the flower spurs that have developed.  I will wire any branches that need adjusting and will re-pot the tree at that time if needed.

I will let the tree grow unchecked until the end of May.  At that time, I will cut back any new growth that does not fit my design and let the tree grow for the rest of the season in anticipation of enjoying the flowers again next year.

This regime is based on my location and will need to be adjusted for your growing conditions.

Let me know if you have any questions.

Cheers,
Paul
 

tmmason10

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Re: Chickasaw Plum
« Reply #22 on: November 16, 2014, 08:06 PM »
The plum is looking well Tom.

You've done a nice job with it this year.

Brian's pruning advise is sound.  If you are not worried about flowers, you can prune any time during the growing season.   Once the branch structure is set, you need to be careful how and when you prune.

This species normally produces flower buds in fascicles from buds of the previous seasons growth.  So, if you cut back hard on this years growth you loose flower buds.  In addition, I have noticed a tendency for the tree to develop flowering spurs on older wood when grown in a container.  These spurs will flower reliably every year so you need to be careful not to remove them.

On established trees, I will prune back hard when the flowers begin to fade in late winter.  I am careful not to remove any of the flower spurs that have developed.  I will wire any branches that need adjusting and will re-pot the tree at that time if needed.

I will let the tree grow unchecked until the end of May.  At that time, I will cut back any new growth that does not fit my design and let the tree grow for the rest of the season in anticipation of enjoying the flowers again next year.

This regime is based on my location and will need to be adjusted for your growing conditions.

Let me know if you have any questions.

Cheers,
Paul


Awesome, thanks Paul. I'll take the advice seasonally adjusted. The tree never skipped a beat this spring so kudos for you building its roots system the last couple of years.
 

pjkatich

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Re: Chickasaw Plum
« Reply #23 on: November 16, 2014, 08:40 PM »


[/quote]

Awesome, thanks Paul. I'll take the advice seasonally adjusted. The tree never skipped a beat this spring so kudos for you building its roots system the last couple of years.
[/quote]


I look forward to seeing the progress of your plum Tom.   

You are off to a great start.

Unfortunately, I did not see this when you first started the thread.  I read some of the other posts and was surprised to read that others have had difficultly containerizing this species.  I have always had very good luck with these trees.  The biggest problem that I encountered was borer infestation.  Treat your Chickasaw plum religiously with a good systemic insecticide.  I like to use one that contains Merit.

When I collect these plums the have no roots.  When I get the collected stumps home, I saw them flat.  I treat them with some rooting hormone and plant them in a small container and leave them alone.  The end result is a root system like the one on your tree.

Keep up the good work.

Regards,
Paul

 

tmmason10

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Re: Chickasaw Plum
« Reply #24 on: April 20, 2015, 09:19 AM »
This tree apparently flowered this spring while it was at NEBGS. I missed it, but pleased at the foliage it has added thus far. This species seems well suited for bonsai, as the leaves have reduced quite a bit from last year. It's even growing a mini fungus on its trunk!
 

J.Kent

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Re: Chickasaw Plum
« Reply #25 on: April 21, 2015, 08:25 AM »
That's not a fungus it is moss and you want it OFF the trunk as it is likely to damage the nice bark on the trunk.  Moss is OK on the soil, not OK on the tree.
 

tmmason10

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Re: Chickasaw Plum
« Reply #26 on: April 21, 2015, 09:15 AM »
I agree about the bit of moss, but this is the fungus I was mentioning.
 

John Romano

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Re: Chickasaw Plum
« Reply #27 on: April 21, 2015, 08:59 PM »
looking good Tom!
 

tmmason10

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Re: Chickasaw Plum
« Reply #28 on: April 21, 2015, 09:36 PM »
 

pjkatich

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Re: Chickasaw Plum
« Reply #29 on: April 26, 2015, 02:25 PM »
Hi Tom,

Looking good.

It would seem that the tree has handled the transition very well.

I'm glad to hear that the plum flowered for you.  To bad you missed it.

Don't forget to treat the tree for borers.

Regards,
Paul