Author Topic: Chickasaw Plum  (Read 17663 times)

tmmason10

  • Full Forum Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 160
Chickasaw Plum
« on: March 20, 2014, 04:13 PM »
I haven't started many threads here, so I thought I'd start one for a Chickasaw plum, prunus Angustifolia, that I recovered from Paul Katich about a month ago. It was barefooted when shipped so I potted it up in this plastic training pot. It has an interesting base, and I included a picture of how it grew last year down in Florida. I'm excited to work with this species and hopefully in a couple of years I can get it to a point where I can let it flower. I know Owen picked up a few of these and I wouldn't mind seeing them posted here...
 

BonsaiEngineer1493

  • Sr. Forum Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 261
Re: Chickasaw Plum
« Reply #1 on: March 20, 2014, 09:17 PM »
Very nice! I'm really interested species. I will definitely keep myself updated with this tree in the future. Good Luck! My ume arrived today. I will post it up

Nick
 

Owen Reich

  • Hero Forum Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 888
  • Thanked: 7 times
Re: Chickasaw Plum
« Reply #2 on: March 21, 2014, 01:00 AM »
The three I received are already opening buds and were potted up at about in pure deciduous grade akadama with a base of medium grain perlite.  I'll post photos when home.  It's America's ume substitute with basically the same flower time and style, deadwood, and similar rough bark.
 

Yenling83

  • Sr. Forum Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 321
Re: Chickasaw Plum
« Reply #3 on: March 21, 2014, 01:34 PM »
very interesting species, I want to see the flowers. I also hope to see yours-Owen one day.
 

plantmanky

  • Jr. Forum Member
  • **
  • Posts: 71
  • Old as Methuselah and feel'n it
Re: Chickasaw Plum
« Reply #4 on: March 23, 2014, 02:43 PM »
Here is a Chickasaw plum that I've had for a number of years that has just started to flower in the greenhouse.  This is a great american native that should be used for bonsai far more than it is currently.  To me it's very similar to the English sloe (Prunus spinosa) in flower size.
 

Jim Doiron

  • Jr. Forum Member
  • **
  • Posts: 69
Re: Chickasaw Plum
« Reply #5 on: March 23, 2014, 07:44 PM »
Great tree... and now I have another on my list of "trees I want". 


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

tmmason10

  • Full Forum Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 160
Re: Chickasaw Plum
« Reply #6 on: March 23, 2014, 08:49 PM »
Very cool tree plantmanky, thanks for sharing. How long have you had it?
 

plantmanky

  • Jr. Forum Member
  • **
  • Posts: 71
  • Old as Methuselah and feel'n it
Re: Chickasaw Plum
« Reply #7 on: March 24, 2014, 10:56 AM »
Thanks all!  Tmmason10, I've had the tree for something like 8 or 9 years.
 

BonsaiEngineer1493

  • Sr. Forum Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 261
Re: Chickasaw Plum
« Reply #8 on: March 27, 2014, 11:21 PM »
very nice plantmanky! Looks like Tmmason10 has a lot to look forward to
 

tmmason10

  • Full Forum Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 160
Re: Chickasaw Plum
« Reply #9 on: April 21, 2014, 12:18 PM »
I thought I had supplied a picture of the whole tree potted in this first post but I guess I didn't. Picked the tree up from he nursery this weekend, it had already extended quite a bit.
 

Joshua Hanzman

  • Sr. Forum Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 258
Re:
« Reply #10 on: April 23, 2014, 09:53 PM »
Oh man this is a great species, i really like this, thanks for the introduction!

Sent from my LG-MS770 using Tapatalk
 

plantmanky

  • Jr. Forum Member
  • **
  • Posts: 71
  • Old as Methuselah and feel'n it
Re: Chickasaw Plum
« Reply #11 on: April 24, 2014, 08:16 AM »
Another Native plum that is good for bonsai is the American plum (Prunus americana).  It's native to the same areas as Chicksaw plum and even a little further North.  Get out into the woods and find some!
 

Brian Van Fleet

  • Full Forum Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 205
  • Thanked: 1 times
Re: Chickasaw Plum
« Reply #12 on: April 24, 2014, 09:37 PM »
These are great and smell Soooo good in bloom.  We had 4 seedlings from a wild one in our last back yard.  I was never able to successfully collect and containerize one, bit always enjoyed the old-rose scent of the blooms.  Good luck with yours Tom...looks happy.
 

tmmason10

  • Full Forum Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 160
Re: Chickasaw Plum
« Reply #13 on: September 29, 2014, 12:57 PM »
Owen et all-

I'm trying to logically think about when to give this tree a hard prune but I'm having trouble. Since this flowers in early spring, would this need to be cutback in winter? Do I cutback now to get rid of any potential flower buds? I'm not sure what to do but any help would be appreciate. The tree looks the same as the prior picture I've let it grow out all year since it was transplanted.
 

Brian Van Fleet

  • Full Forum Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 205
  • Thanked: 1 times
Re: Chickasaw Plum
« Reply #14 on: September 29, 2014, 09:05 PM »
I'd wait until after any chance of blooming has passed; they bloom in early March here.  Flower buds will be set and maybe swelling now, on either side of leaf buds.  If the tree has flower buds, I'd definitely wait until after flowering to prune.

When you proceed, be careful to prune so you keep viable buds.  If you're not sure what's viable, prune lightly in March, and heavy (back to first opening leaf bud) when leaf buds start to open.  Have fun, plums are great!