Pages: [1]
Author Topic: Chaenomeles sinensis - Chinese Quince  (Read 1351 times)
JRob
Hero Forum Member
*****
Posts: 578
USDA Hardiness: 5b



« on: March 02, 2013, 06:23 PM »

Afternoon All,

Last night I pulled one of my favorite bonsai books of the shelf to peruse - "Four Season's of Bonsai" by Kyuzo Murata. Adapted from "Bonsai no shiki" originally published in 1984 my copy was delisted from Timberland Regional Library in Olympia, WA and was purchased off ebay for a steal at $6.74. It is the english translation by Kate Chandless published in 1991. Following bonsai through their seasonal transformation the book is full of fine bonsai and accent plants. I just love it.

On page 21 and 126-127 you will find photographs of Chinese quince with comments by Murata.

While repotting today at Cass Bonsai I purchased a Chinese quince and planted it in a S. Rayner pot that seemed especially suited to the tree. I love the way the color of the pot plays off the bronze color of the new leaves just popping and will compliment the fall foliage nicely. The next repotting should lower the tree to the proper hight but for now she is a little high due to only partially reducing a major root. Over the next few years as I work on ramification and form she should turn out lovely and hopefully I'll get her blooming. The species has very distinctive bark that is very attractive especially when the leaves have fallen and provides interest in the fall and winter.

JRob
« Last Edit: March 02, 2013, 06:26 PM by JRob » Logged

Don Blackmond
Sr. Forum Member
****
Posts: 479
USDA Hardiness: 5a



WWW
« Reply #1 on: March 03, 2013, 07:54 AM »

Your tree has a nice trunk line.  It looks quite vigorous too.  You will have fun with that one.  The bark on quince remind me of our local sycamore trees; appealing to the eye.
Logged

Judy
Sr. Forum Member
****
Posts: 457
USDA Hardiness: 5b

« Reply #2 on: March 03, 2013, 07:58 AM »

I agree, very nice lines on this quince. 

I too love C. quince, I have one in development stages that I bought specifically as it reminds me of sycamores, which I dearly love.
I bought that book- four seasons- as a gift for a friend, and of course peeked at it before I gave it.  I think of it often, I'll have to get another copy for me!
Logged

JRob
Hero Forum Member
*****
Posts: 578
USDA Hardiness: 5b



« Reply #3 on: March 03, 2013, 10:03 AM »

Don & Judy,

Don so glad you made the connection to the bark of the sycamore. Missouri as you know has them in abundance and I love driving in the late fall and early spring when the sun is glistening and the vista ahead is filled with their distinctive silhouettes of powdery white and silvery grey sprinkled in the woodlands. My neighbor behind me has a lovely specimen towering in their backyard and I had planned to have mine positioned so they are both seen in the same view. I have a prized pot for my first bonsai friend who is observant enough to make the obvious association. Should be fun.

Judy would advise you to find another copy and keep it on your shelf. I study the photos often and am fascinated not ony with the bonsai but particularly the accent plants. Both are so delicate and refined.

JRob
Logged

Owen Reich
Hero Forum Member
*****
Posts: 663
USDA Hardiness: Nashville, TN 6b



WWW
« Reply #4 on: March 03, 2013, 10:14 AM »

It's called Pseudocydonia sinensis (unless the botanists needed to have some busy work recently). 

Make sure you wire young shoots where you want or they will lignify quickly and not bend, but snap.

Nice little tree.
Logged

John Kirby
Hero Forum Member
*****
Posts: 2021
USDA Hardiness: 6



« Reply #5 on: March 03, 2013, 02:06 PM »

That wouls be snap with a SNAP!
Logged

JRob
Hero Forum Member
*****
Posts: 578
USDA Hardiness: 5b



« Reply #6 on: November 15, 2013, 06:19 AM »

Thanks everyone for the information & comments. Not a great shot below I pulled it off the clubs Facebook  page but this tree had lovely fall color on the benches. Hagedorn and I reviewed this tree last weekend and did some major pruning. Wiring this weekend but here is a before picture.

JRob
Logged

Judy
Sr. Forum Member
****
Posts: 457
USDA Hardiness: 5b

« Reply #7 on: November 15, 2013, 08:19 AM »

Nice fall color that! Mine shifts to the yellow side.  (btw, I did get another copy of that book.)
Will be watching for the after shot.
Logged

JRob
Hero Forum Member
*****
Posts: 578
USDA Hardiness: 5b



« Reply #8 on: November 16, 2013, 04:03 PM »

Afternoon All,

It seems like several of us are working on Quince - Both Japanese & Chinese. Here is an update on my Chinese Quince. Hagedorn and I cut it back and I wired it today. Love it paired with the SR pot - so did Michael. I also love the way the bark develops on this species. Hope everyone is having a great day. Judy glad you found a copy of the book. JRob
Logged

Judy
Sr. Forum Member
****
Posts: 457
USDA Hardiness: 5b

« Reply #9 on: November 16, 2013, 05:08 PM »

Such a good pairing, and wonderful movement on that guy.  Thanks for the update photo!
Logged

JRob
Hero Forum Member
*****
Posts: 578
USDA Hardiness: 5b



« Reply #10 on: November 17, 2013, 06:26 AM »

Thanks Judy.

Owen thanks for the correction. That's the problem looking at old books, I should have checked current taxonomy.

Pseudocydonia sinensis (Chinese Quince), the only species in the genus Pseudocydonia, is a deciduous or semi-evergreen tree in the family Rosaceae, native to eastern Asia in China. It is closely related to the east Asian genus Chaenomeles, and is sometimes placed in Chaenomeles as C. sinensis, but notable differences are the lack of thorns, and that the flowers are produced singly, not in clusters. It is closely related to the European Quince genus Cydonia, but one notable difference is the serrated leaves.
In China, the species is called "mugua", while in Korea, it is called "mogwa" (hangul: ??; Chinese/hanja: ?? - not to be confused with "papaya", whose Chinese transliteration is also called ??) which is used for medicine or for making beverages. In Japan, it is known as "karin - ??" (? - a flower, ? - a pear of an Asian round variety that is called "nashi").
It grows to 10–18 m tall, with a dense, twiggy crown. The leaves are alternately arranged, simple, 6–12 cm long and 3–6 cm broad, and have a serrated margin. The flowers are 2.5–4 cm diameter, with five pale pink petals; flowering is in mid spring. The fruit is a large ovoid pome 12–17 cm long with five carpels; it gives off an intense, sweet smell and it ripens in late autumn.
Logged

Pages: [1]
Print
 
Jump to: