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Yatsubishu Chinese Elm Forest

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johng:
Here is an Elm forest that I have been working on for about a year and a half now...I purchased it at one of Bill's auctions.  He told me it was about 20 years old.  What do you think?

Elm Forest

Thanks,
John

bwaynef:
An irrelevance first:  Is this different than a Yatsubusa Chinese Elm?

I like the overall shape of this tree.  The canopy looks very natural.  On the left side of the planting there are two trees that are growing at the same angle, with about the same diameter, and the fact that they are directly adjacent (when looking from the front) tends to look somewhat too uniform for the rest of the planting.  Perhaps a little more separation between the two would benefit the planting.  (Without really considering the implications, that separation could be achieved by moving the 2nd tree from left forward just a little more.)

This isn't so much a suggestion as it is a sincere question:  Would the planting be improved by having additional branching coming in front of the trunk of the tree planted on the far right?  There seems to be branching enough to do it coming from the tree 4th tree from left.

bonsaikc:
John,
I, too, appreciate the naturalness of this tree. I don't think the two trunks are too uniform at all, the entire thing has an "unstudied" appearance to it.

Chris

johng:

--- Quote from: bwaynef on June 19, 2009, 10:39 AM ---An irrelevance first:  Is this different than a Yatsubusa Chinese Elm? Yes it is the same..I just screwed up the name.

I like the overall shape of this tree.  The canopy looks very natural.  On the left side of the planting there are two trees that are growing at the same angle, with about the same diameter, and the fact that they are directly adjacent (when looking from the front) tends to look somewhat too uniform for the rest of the planting.  Perhaps a little more separation between the two would benefit the planting.  (Without really considering the implications, that separation could be achieved by moving the 2nd tree from left forward just a little more.)  Separating at the root level would be tough and is more risk that I am probably willing to take..However it may be that the angles can be adjusted with a separator or two.

This isn't so much a suggestion as it is a sincere question:  Would the planting be improved by having additional branching coming in front of the trunk of the tree planted on the far right?  There seems to be branching enough to do it coming from the tree 4th tree from left. 

--- End quote ---

Thank you Wayne for the thoughtful reply.  One thing I failed to mention is that this video was shot at the time the buds were breaking...the composition in full leaf is much fuller...even after a good pruning:)

Thanks again,
John

johng:

--- Quote from: bonsaikc on June 19, 2009, 02:09 PM ---John,
I, too, appreciate the naturalness of this tree. I don't think the two trunks are too uniform at all, the entire thing has an "unstudied" appearance to it.

Chris

--- End quote ---
Thanks Chris...perhaps unstudied is a good way to put it...I am certainly trying to avoid flat foliage pads...but still keep the foliage light and not so dense that the inside is dense and shaded. 

Although it doesn't show that well in the video, I think the root base is perhaps this planting's best feature.  I am still in the process of exposing the roots...there was very little rootage showing when I bought this.

Thanks again for your input!
John

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